Black People Politics : The Black Right To Vote

Fine1952

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Sep 27, 2005
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15th Amendment.jpg

A. Making Amends

The 15th Amendment to the Constitution granted African American men (ie. African American Women would not be given this benefit until after the Women Sufferage Movement in 1848) the right to vote by declaring that the "right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any state on account of race, color, or previous condition of servitude.".

When Black people come out in huge numbers their vote has an unmistaken impact. However, without an FINANCIAL POWER BASE and a political plat form the right to vote is nothing more than a mechanical action that is sifted into the current system of politics.

For example, let's say most Black people are democrats and choose to endorse the democratic nominee for a presidential run. If Black people don't have a financial power base and a list of demands ready when they vote their votes means nothing in the long run. Because if that candidate wins its back to business as usual (ie. ignoring our needs in this country).

Let's say, on the other hand, for example that most Black people are republicans and choose to endorse the republican nominee for a presidential run. If those Black people do not have a FINANCIAL POWER BASE as well as a list of demands their vote means absolutely nothing. Because you see if that candidate is elected the political system returns right back to business as usual; and that vote becomes just a mechanical exercise.



B. Once this issue is settled there remains the harbanger of "The Electoral College"

The Electoral College’s Racist Origins
More than two centuries after it was designed to empower southern white voters, the system continues to do just that.
NOVEMBER 17, 2019
Wilfred Codri

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"...Right from the get-go, the Electoral College has produced no shortage of lessons about the impact of racial entitlement in selecting the president. History buffs and Hamiltonfans are aware that in its first major failure, the Electoral College produced a tie between Thomas Jefferson and his putative running mate, Aaron Burr. What’s less known about the election of 1800 is the way the Electoral College succeeded, which is to say that it operated as one might have expected, based on its embrace of the three-fifths compromise. The South’s baked-in advantages—the bonus electoral votes it received for maintaining slaves, all while not allowing those slaves to vote—made the difference in the election outcome. It gave the slaveholder Jefferson an edge over his opponent, the incumbent president and abolitionist John Adams. To quote Yale Law’s Akhil Reed Amar, the third president “metaphorically rode into the executive mansion on the backs of slaves.” That election continued an almost uninterrupted trend of southern slaveholders and their doughfaced sympathizers winning the White House that lasted until Abraham Lincoln’s victory in 1860. ..."




C. And if that weren't enough ---Black voters have to wait every 25 years --or whenever the racist government chooses-- to update an extention on their right to vote, smh

1582284643424.png

By - The Washington Times - Thursday, July 27, 2006



D. The Initial "Right 2 Vote"

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Since in 1866 the gub'ment passed a civil rights act why did it need to pass an act in 1965 as if the one in 1866 had no merit?

WE really need to read about that legislation, understand, then apply it just as Bryon Allen is doing in his case against Comcast and Charter!
 
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bientempo

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Oct 11, 2009
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we must take the senate in 2020
Point well taken, James, because the Senate controls the House.

The former President Obama figured that out and his next chess move was straight to the White House.

Yet we must be mindful of A, B, V, and D.
You do realize that it was a Republican Congress that overrode a Democratic President in order to approve the civil rights act of 1866? The republican congress was also the ones that impeached President Johnson. The Democrats were not your friends at that time
A Republican-dominated Congress enacted a landmark Civil Rights Act on this day in 1866, overriding a veto by President Andrew Johnson. The law’s chief thrust was to offer protection to slaves freed in the aftermath of the Civil War. It sought to negate the so-called Black Codes in the South, which undermined the end of slavery, as mandated by the 13th Amendment to the Constitution. .
 

jamesfrmphilly

going above and beyond
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You do realize that it was a Republican Congress that overrode a Democratic President in order to approve the civil rights act of 1866? The republican congress was also the ones that impeached President Johnson. The Democrats were not your friends at that time
A Republican-dominated Congress enacted a landmark Civil Rights Act on this day in 1866, overriding a veto by President Andrew Johnson. The law’s chief thrust was to offer protection to slaves freed in the aftermath of the Civil War. It sought to negate the so-called Black Codes in the South, which undermined the end of slavery, as mandated by the 13th Amendment to the Constitution. .
the year is now 2020.
 

Fine1952

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Sep 27, 2005
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The right to vote is null and void if the gubment changes the rules....!

Watch "House of Cards" to get an idea of how this works!!!


:lol: :lol: :lol:
 

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