Black Spirituality Religion : The Bible vs Black Liberation

Discussion in 'Black Spirituality / Religion - General Discussion' started by Music Producer, Nov 10, 2006.

  1. Music Producer

    Music Producer Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Let us together first define what it is we feel the need to be liberated from.
    One or two sentences will suffice for each person to define what they feel black people need to be liberated from.
     
  2. KWABENA

    KWABENA STAFF STAFF

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    In 2 Sentences or less:

    Get rid of EUROPEAN-ISM, and all concepts and practices deriving from it.

    Ase'

    KD
     
  3. OmowaleX

    OmowaleX Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Self-delusion.
     
  4. Angela22

    Angela22 Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Liberation from sin would do one very well, and that comes in faith. ;)
     
  5. Clyde C Coger Jr

    Clyde C Coger Jr going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Miss you a lot my friend, hope all is well with you, Music Producer. But Cone said it best, in my opinion:



    [​IMG]


    James Hal Cone (born August 5, 1938) is an Americantheologian, best known for his advocacy of Black liberation theology. His 1969 book Black Theology and Black Power provided a new way to articulate the distinctiveness of theology in the black Church.[1] Cone’s work was influential from the time of the book's publication, and his work remains influential today. His work has been both utilized and critiqued inside and outside of the African-American theological community. He is currently theCharles Augustus Briggs Distinguished Professor of Systematic Theology at Union Theological Seminary in the City of New York.[2]
     
  6. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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    Black Liberation Theology, in its Founder's Words
    March 31, 2008

    ....Cone explains that at the core of black liberation theology is an effort — in a white-dominated society, in which black has been defined as evil — to make the gospel relevant to the life and struggles of American blacks, and to help black people learn to love themselves. It's an attempt, he says "to teach people how to be both unapologetically Black and Christian at the same time."

    .....http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=89236116
     
  7. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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    Liberating Black Theology: The Bible and the Black Experience in AmericaPaperback


    by Anthony B. Bradley


    ....In this interdisciplinary, biblical critique of the black experience in America, Anthony Bradley introduces audiences to black liberation theology and its spiritual and social impact. He starts with James Cone's proposition that the "victim" mind-set is inherent within black consciousness. Bradley then explores how such biblical misinterpretation has historically hindered black churches in addressing the diverse issues of their communities and prevented adherents from experiencing the freedoms of the gospel. Yet Liberating Black Theology does more than consider the ramifications of this belief system; it suggests an alternate approach to the black experience that can truly liberate all Christ-followers.

    [​IMG]







     
  8. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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    http://www.christianitytoday.com/ct/2011/october/biblical-liberation-theology.html
    A Fully Biblical Liberation Theology

    Free at first: an excerpt from 'Chaos and Grace.'
    Mark Galli
    [ posted 10/14/2011


    Liberation theology began as a movement with-in the Roman Catholic Church in Latin America in the 1950s and 1960s, but soon found quarter in some sectors of Protestantism. It is a political theology that interprets the teachings of Jesus Christ in terms of liberation from unjust economic, political, and social conditions.

    Proponents say it is the way to view Christian faith through the eyes of the poor; opponents say it is nothing but baptized Marxism.

    I tend to side with the detractors, and yet the liberation theologians—people like Gustavo Gutiérrez of Peru, Leonardo Boff of Brazil, and Jon Sobrino of Spain—had one thing right: the church's call to make the cause of the poor its own cause. That often entails challenging unjust regimes that grind the face of the poor ever deeper into misery. Certainly one finds biblical justification for seeking political liberation—for one, in the Exodus story, a great inspiration to blacks caught in the clutches of American racism.

    That being said, liberation theology as it usually comes to us seems more indebted to Marx than to Moses.

    Yet the main problem is not that liberation theology went too far but rather that it did not go far enough. When the Bible—in particular, Jesus—speaks of liberation, there is much more at stake than politics. And it is for this reason, among others, that I think evangelicals should adhere to a liberation theology of our own. And we should frame that theology not with politics but with religion, morality, and spirituality—the three greatest oppressors humanity has ever known.....
     
  9. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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    A Campaign Pitch Rekindles the Question: Just What Is Liberation Theology?

    By MARK OPPENHEIMER


    Published: May 25, 2012



    .....Dr. Cone, who teaches at Union Theological Seminary in New York, defines liberation theology as “an interpretation of the Christian gospel from the experience and perspectives and lives of people who are at the bottom in society — the lowest economic and racial groups.” ...... http://www.nytimes.com/2012/05/26/u...questions-about-liberation-theology.html?_r=0
     
  10. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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    James Cone: Black Theology, Liberation, and Reconciliation

    May 17, 2012


    .....Cone explained the appearance of Black theology as "due primarily to the failure of white religionists to relate the gospel of Jesus to the pain of being black in a white racist society." Cone argued that white theology has basically been a theology of the white oppressor, sanctioning genocide, enslavement, and brutality. Because American white theology has been "patriotic," it has become a servant of the racist state and "can only mean death to black people." Cone wrote:

    American theology . . . has largely ignored its domestic problem on race. It has not called the Church to be involved in confronting this society with the meaning of the Kingdom in the light of Christ . . . [American theology] has virtually ignored the task of relating the truth of the gospel to the problem of race in America.
    He contended that the lack of relevant and "risky" theology suggests that theologians are unable to free themselves from the oppressive structures of society and proposed an alternative:
    It is evident, then, that the main difficulty which most whites have with Black Power and its relationship to the Christian gospel stems from their own inability to translate traditional theological language into the life situation of black people. The black man's response to God's act in Christ must be different from the white's because his life experiences are different.
    Beyond this emphasis on the "black experience," Cone suggested that a significant message of biblical theology is liberation from oppression. He wrote, "The God of the biblical faith and black religion is best known as the Liberator of the oppressed from bondage. . . . To resist evil is to participate in God's redemption of the world." The task of Black theology, then, is to analyze the nature of the gospel of Jesus Christ in the light of "oppressed black people" so they will realize the inseparability of the gospel and their humiliated condition. Cone explained that this realization will bestow upon them the necessary power to "break the chains of oppression." Cone viewed Black theology as "a theology of and for the black community, seeking to interpret the religious dimensions of the forces of liberation in that community."
    ...cont.... http://thegospelcoalition.org/blogs/tgc/2012/05/17/james-cone-black-theology-liberation-and-reconciliation/
     
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