Black People : The Almost Forgotten Selma March

Discussion in 'Black People Open Forum' started by oldsoul, Mar 25, 2015.

  1. OldSoul

    OldSoul Permanent Black Man PREMIUM MEMBER

    Country:
    United States
    Joined:
    May 16, 2002
    Messages:
    1,830
    Likes Received:
    909
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Staying Alive
    Location:
    Bronzeville USA
    Home Page:
    Ratings:
    +976
    [​IMG]
    The Almost Forgotten Selma March
    It was a glorious moment in American history. On March 7, 2015, forty thousand Americans gathered in Selma, Alabama, to commemorate the 50th anniversary of Bloody Sunday. On that day in 1965, Alabama state troopers and local police brutally assaulted 600 African Americans, members of Martin Luther King’s voting rights campaign. Beaten and shocked by billy clubs and cattle prods, trampled by horses, and choked by clouds of tear gas, the marchers fell back and fled for their lives. When someone called for an ambulance, Selma’s Sheriff, Jim Clark, replied, “Let the buzzards eat them.” President Lyndon Johnson later compared the assault to Lexington and Concord, a turning point in American history because it touched the conscience of the nation and accelerated the passage of the historic Voting Rights Act.
    On the anniversary earlier this month, the crowd included elderly veterans of the ’65 march, 100 members of the U.S. Congress, former President George W. Bush and his wife, Laura, and the current president of the United States and his family.

    The celebration, known officially as the Annual Bridge Crossing Jubilee, commemorated not just Bloody Sunday but the aborted march two days later and the final successful trek (March 21-25) that brought the marchers, numbering 25,000, to Montgomery, the home of arch-segregationist George C. Wallace. Civil Rights activists hoped to present the governor with a list of grievances, the greatest of which was the denial of the right to vote.

    Fifty years ago, that five day march from Selma to Montgomery was not widely celebrated but denigrated by a number of distinguished Americans. Former President Harry S. Truman, who had urged Congress to adopt a civil rights program 17 years earlier, called the march “silly.”

    The final successful march from Selma to Montgomery was neither “silly” nor irrelevant. First, it kept a promise to the people of Marion, Alabama, who had suffered a vicious beating by Alabama state troopers and the death of Jimmie Lee Jackson, shot by a state trooper during the riot on February 18, 1965. At first, activists wanted to carry Jackson’s coffin to Montgomery and place it on the steps of George Wallace’s State House. From that desire evolved the eventual plan to march from Selma to Montgomery.
    ...While the final, successful march lacks the drama of the first, it too deserves to be remembered now that the television cameras and newsmen and women have departed.

     
  2. Clyde C Coger Jr

    Clyde C Coger Jr going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

    Country:
    United States
    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2006
    Messages:
    39,390
    Likes Received:
    10,421
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Speaker/Teacher/Author
    Location:
    Dallas, TX
    Home Page:
    Ratings:
    +12,077
    In the Spirit of Sankofa,



    Memories of Selma - All of Them


    On March 21, 1965, a diverse group of civil rights activists stood with Martin Luther King, Jr. to begin the third and finally successful march from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama. As such, it is part of this month's many remembrances of Selma and "Bloody Sunday." But it is more than just a commemoration. Selma is a living challenge to each of us. It challenges us to remember our history -- and the brave women and men who marched and were brutally assaulted. It cries out for us to recall how they returned to Selma to march once, twice, three times, always with more supporters and allies by their side. For the U.S., Selma stands as a beacon reminding us that people can stand against injustice and move forward, especially when we do it together ...


    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/joyce...them_b_6910132.html?ncid=txtlnkusaolp00000592

    ...

     
Loading...