Black History Culture : THE AFRICAN ROOTS OF AFRICAN AMERICAN CULTURE

Discussion in 'Black History - Culture - Panafricanism' started by Isaiah, Aug 26, 2004.

  1. Isaiah

    Isaiah Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    http://www.black-collegian.com/issues/1998-12/africanroots12.shtml

    This article is a great little primer for a discussion on those things culturally African which our ancestors brought to the so called New World, and which we have retained - in some instances, unconsciously. Read, enjoy, and pose some questions... Let's have a discussion on these things of our culture...

    Peace!
    Isaiah
     
  2. NNQueen

    NNQueen going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Brother Isaiah that was an excellent article and it certainly taught me a lot of new information. I found it to be quite interesting and easy to understand regarding our African American cultural roots. Given the nature of our origins from differents parts of Africa with different cultures, I wonder whether this may shed light on the difficulty we often face today with unifying? I realize that once we lost contact/exposure to our original African ancestors, racism had a devastating impact on us and our cultural roots, but if we could bond before I'm wondering why we weren't able to sustain it or why it seems difficult to do again? We obviously were able to overcome language and cultural barriers to unite and support each other. Have we assimilated and lost our common sense?

    I hope we can generate some good discussion around these topics!

    Peace,
    Queenie :spinstar:
     
  3. Blackbird

    Blackbird Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Peace All,

    Brother Isaiah, preciate the article. Fa sho. I love how you have taken a role as enlightener. Continue to let de light shine on. Dis lil light of mine, I'm gone let it.....

    Queen, I think the main reason we have difficulty unifying is because we lack a national identity, which, itself, is partly attributable to the historical reality of our people. Yes, the reality we all issue from various groups from various regions. Tribal/ethnic affiliations were dissolved on the plantation as the main source of identification became locality-based (regional to plantation). After the Civil War, Black folks were thrown together without any functional organization - no concept of nationhood.

    Blackbird (ends mysteriously for what reason......)
     
  4. Isaiah

    Isaiah Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Queenie and BlackBird, dang, we meet again!!!(LOL!) I remember that it was you TWO who first responded to that Great Migrations post I did way back... I've missed the both of you dearly, and thanks for the props!

    BlackBird, I'm trying to do my part... Being an "enlightener" is a lable much too large for me - serious... I just found out a lot about this stuff in the past few years, because, as Destee and Queenie, I wanted to solve this riddle of what is mine, and what is theirs for once and for all time... Well, it aint that simple, I've come to find, but the journey toward that end has been a mug, I'm tellin' ya(smile!) Things I would never have attributed to African Culture keep rearing the wonderful heads all over the joint, and it is wonderful... Like I told Destee, some of the things I might present are boring as hell, but if we wanna know about our culture, we will have to bear with it...

    So much of Africa, for example, has to do with the ANCESTORS, and as such, our ancestors in the United STates and elsewhere, have taken elaborate steps through the years to make and mark TOMBSTONES quite elaborately... A lot of this information about our roots is being found now in those segregated AFrican American cemetaries(smile!) Imagine that! I will be bringing that ghoulish stuff here, because that is part of our culture - which is another thing... Is our culture ALL GOOOOD, as we used to say???(smile!) Let me stop rat dere, cuz I believe that's a thread comin' on...

    Another thing I've been asking myself is, are we afraid, as a collective, of this kind of forum, because we know so little about who we are??? Do we feel we'll be called out as being ignorant if we indulge in the discussion, and find out how little we know of ourselves??? Hmmmm... I certainly hope not, as we're all here to learn a lil somethin'-somethin'...

    Peace!
    Isaiah
     
  5. Sekhemu

    Sekhemu Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Excellent thread
     
  6. NNQueen

    NNQueen going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Yes, a lot of our history and culture as Africans in America is hidden in places we least expect to find it like cemetaries. Years ago, I discovered the value of cemetaries and the stories tombs could tell when I was studying my family's genealogy. Alarmingly though, so much has been lost and continues to be lost as more of our burial sites fall prey to construction companies turning them into new suburbs and shopping malls. In addition, as the elderly get older, our oral history is stolen by Alzheimer's and if you've been listening to the news lately, not surprisingly, Blacks tend to suffer from this disease more than anyone else. When our ancestors and burial grounds no longer exist, what are we going to do as far as learning our cultural roots? Another good source of information, believe it or not, is the huge historical library created and maintained by the Mormons in Utah. They have a wealth of information that is virtually free to anyone who wants it. It's probably the second largest containment of information on African American history to the Library of Congress.

    Queenie :spinstar:
     
  7. Blackbird

    Blackbird Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Greetings All,

    Inside Mama Oya's domain, the cemetary, are many jewels. As Queen said, the value of genealogy research by observing tombstones (DOB/DOD/Military Service/Civic Affiliations/etc.). Also, there are many Afrikanisms as well. Some gravesites have broken pottery shards, small objects and cups. My family have what we call the baby tree. It is a tree where all the babies that have died in my family are buried around. When I lived in Louisiana, I would visit the old family graveyard and water the baby tree. This custom retain by my family have its roots in the Congo area of Afrika, where trees were planted over the graves of the deceased. Look to Mama Oya for the mysteries of your roots as she and the ancestors walk together.

    Blackbird
     
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