Black People : Tavis Smiley Show. . .Sheryl Flowers

Discussion in 'Black People Open Forum' started by mazimtaim, Aug 7, 2009.

  1. mazimtaim

    mazimtaim Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Aug 29, 2006
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    Such a beautiful, intelligent, young sista.

    Radio Producer Sheryl Flowers Loses Battle to Cancer

    Career Spanned Nearly Two Decades in Public Radio

    LOS ANGELES, June 10 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Sheryl Annette Flowers, 42, whose drive and passion for news and expertise in storytelling Tavis Smiley credits with the success of his broadcast career on public radio, has died.


    She died at Cedar's Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles on June 8 following a nearly two-year battle with triple negative breast cancer, her family said.

    There will be no funeral service. A memorial service will be held at 11 a.m. July 8, 2009 at the Nate Holden Performing Arts Center, 4718 W. Washington Blvd., in Los Angles, CA.

    Flowers was the Director of Communications for The Smiley Group, Inc., a communications company founded by Smiley. But until May 2009 she had spent nearly five years as the executive producer of The Tavis Smiley Show distributed by Public Radio International (PRI) and prior to that was the senior supervising producer of The Tavis Smiley Show from National Public Radio (NPR) from 2002-2004.

    When Smiley's show on NPR launched in 2002 it broke ground as the first signature show hosted by an African American. When Flowers was hired as producer she joined a handful of African American women working in a field largely dominated by white men. Ironically, the show she and her staff produced daily, which was targeted to African Americans, drew a mostly white audience, Smiley said.

    "The show was a first for NPR and the fact that it was successful across a mainstream audience eager for news and information about the African American experience is a tribute to Sheryl's vision and direction," he added. "She had great instincts and insights into stories and issues that were appealing to our listeners."