Black History Culture : sum questions..

Discussion in 'Black History - Culture - Panafricanism' started by daroc, Aug 12, 2004.

  1. daroc

    daroc Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    to all-

    is the want to reclaim ourselves strong enouf?

    where does one start in learning about "their" culture... wit their past....self... family... laws.. history... where do u start?

    wats one thing all (black) people should kno from the past... or value?

    wats one thing u kno or learned thats made u aprreicate who u r.. ur culture?

    does revolution run threw us and we not kno how to find it.. to "reclaim" ourselves....( jus imagine if we all came together on 1- jus one thing- wat we could do)

    jus a few questions on my mind...
     
  2. MrBlak

    MrBlak Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    The want to reclaim ourself is not strong enough. The young are not being taught anything at home because many of their parents were taught nothing at home. The generations with the most solid knowledge of the struggles (those that lived thru it) dont care to put in any work to teach the young but have all the time in the world to complain about them. When was the last time an "elder" stepped to a school and told personalized stories of "the struggle"???

    It starts at home though....that is the main thing.
     
  3. daroc

    daroc Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    thank u mrblak for ur words of thot
     
  4. jamesfrmphilly

    jamesfrmphilly going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    it's difficult to say anything to anyone when the insult and disrespect start to fly the moment you open your mouth.
    the knowledge is there.
    whenever the "young" want it, all they have to do is ask, nicely.
    there are numerous books at the public library that have the stories of the struggle.
    the auto biography of Malcolm X comes to mind.
    if you can ever stop cussin and fussin, you may find there is a whole world out there for you.
     
  5. daroc

    daroc Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    i guess wat mabye mrblak is tryin to say- which poses another question- who should take the initiative( self or past)- its that usually elders teach their young appreciation for culture and wat not.. but its obvious there is a lack of that .....

    when i started reading all the books about the struggle.. and people during those movements.. they motivated me..yes.. but they really didnt touch me til i heard yall- on here speak about the lack of their knowledge and strength..... it didnt really effect me til i was hit wit it from other people

    i guess u can read and learn.. and do something over and over and get a 100 everytime but still lack an appreciation for wat u've done...and not value wat u've learned

    i mean jus like destee said we talk the talk so well... but when it all comes down to it... our black people really ready to claim wat is ours to claim.... will we ever again come to the piont of enuf strength 2 fight for us...i think we will.. but by then will it be too late?

    james- i would really like( please) u to answer the questions pertain to wat one should kno- cuz wit age cumz wisdom... so please lay some down.....

    i hope i made some sense.... my mind tends to wander...
     
  6. jamesfrmphilly

    jamesfrmphilly going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    sure, here's some:
     
  7. Isaiah

    Isaiah Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Daroc, I am going to begin to start to put da "smack" down on this forum, as I am the one that asked the Gods(Queen Mother Destee)that it be, and it became(smile!) By "smack" I don't mean drugs or violence, I mean knowledge, I mean those things that constitute culture... You asked where do you start? Well, since culture encompasses most everything, you can actually start anywhere...

    The essence of our Africaness is not our complexions, history, or great empires of yore, but the philosophical perspective on life gained through the ages by those who put those great empires together... In other words, Africans have a particular purview about the world based on thousands of years of cultural knowledge... We believe, for example, that it takes an entire village to raise a baby, because those many thousands of years have taught us that this method is foolproof, no pun intended... If everywhere a child ventures, he or she is met and regulated by the same rules, they tend to learn and follow those rules unconsciously... If there are different sets of rules governing neighbors, and there is no consistency, confusion begins to reign supreme...

    That is what we have today, an African community that no longer governs itself... This was not true in my youth... Those African Americans who came north from the south didn't leave their culture down south... So we, in Chicago or Los Angeles or Philadelphia, were governed, in full effect, by that same village mentality that reigned in our parents hometowns... Daroc, I have a number of theories as to why the old ways longer exist, but time doesn't permit me to go there just yet... When i have some time, that will be a thread I would love to start, because we stand to learn a great deal about ourselves by studying OURSELVES, without so much focusing on the DEVIL(smile!)

    As for the elders bringing knowledge and personal experiences to the schools, what difference would it make, Mr. Blak??? We've got a brother at this board, who went to the joint for ten years, and has spent his entire life in the service of African people, and who's listening to him??? Brother OldSoul has shared many of his life experiences with us at this board, and I doubt it is appreciated by many of the young folks... Does he have to be a celebrity, or make booty-shakin' videos to get some dap from the young folks???(smile!) Oh, he's got street and Life Credibility, but he aint on T.V. like Fiddy and Diddy... Talk back to me on that, because I'm confused... What'chall really want, us to dig up brother Malcolm, and throw on some of Ballot or The Bullet tapes???

    We need to show our youth far more love, affection, caring, and support than we do - true dat - but our sharing the war stories is located all up and down the library shelves in your localities... I've read where down in the south, these White Folks barred us from reading books, and would come after you with a vengeance if they found out you were reading the Chicago Defender or the Pittsburgh Courier(smile!) Richard Wright speaks eloquently to this in his essays about the Jim Crow conditions in Mississippi...Whew, Richard Wright, one of ours and America's greatest writers, had to ask a good samaritan white guy to borrow books from the library for him, because he was forbidden the right to borrow books!!!

    That was "after" slavery, during the age of Jim Crow, and that was some real oppression... His and our ancestor's determination to READ has made it possible for young people to gobble up all the knowledge they could ever want, and they're spending 70 hours in front of the Boob Tube per week... You young folk are running around here talking about you're oppressed... You do so out of your ignorance of what went down before you came to this plane, man... And you do so because you CHOOSE to sit down and watch BET instead of getting your highknees into the library, and reading about your past... It is not just about slavery and oppression... it is about a majestic people rising above all kinds of devilish nonsense, and instead of going stark-raving mad, fighting it with a dignity and aplomb that defies even my imagination...

    I could not have bore witness to some of the things Richard Wright says he bore witness to down south, and not have freakin' went straight through me a few white boys... In my youth I was a terriby hotheaded kid, and I was real decent with my hands - or something blunt in them(smile!) When I was a teenager, and got my orders from the military to go to Mississippi for training, my mother took my face in her hands, and cried for me to behave myself down there(smile!) It was 1976, and the struggle had been fought, but my mother had those visions of her baby coming home looking like Emmett Till...(smile!) Mississippi turned out to one of the most transcendent experiences of my life, and I have those beautiful African Americans down there to thank for that...


    I don't need to shake the hands of, or be spoken to, by Andrew Young, Dr. King, and Fred Shuttlesworth, because though they were mighty forces for change, they contributed no more to that change than the sweet warm folks, many still living, that risked their life and limb for me down there... All I have ever needed to know to be on my job, was how many little teenaged brothers like Emmett Till lost their lives down there over some petty little cracka !@#$%...

    In the book, Radio Free Dixie, Robert F. Williams talks about how a 7-year old African American boy was thrown in prison for playing with a little 7-year old White girl, and how those devils were threatening to lynch that little boy for something as innocent as that... This happened the year I was born, in 1959, and it happened in the state where my daddy was born, so it could've been one of my brothers, who were that age, and a little older then... That's all I need to know, man, to let me know what my people have endured in this wilderness, and where we are now because of the fierce fight we waged to stop that madness... If you aint inspired by that, I don't know what'cha smokin', but I don't want none... Better be alive and high on life, than dead while smokin' that stuff(smile!)

    Peace!
    Isaiah
     
  8. daroc

    daroc Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    thanks Isaiah for ur powerful words.....i'lll come back to them... hopefully... after i get some mo options....
     
  9. MississippiRed

    MississippiRed Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Richard Wright lived 1 block from where I was raised in Natchez MS, and I love his writing but your comment where you say you would have had to go through a few whites if you went through what he went through got me to thinking...See the majority of America sees us Blacks in Mississippi at that time as the victim, completely submissive to the whims of white folk which wasn't the case ...white folk would at times come up missing never to be seen or heard from again, white boys would come to our side of town looking for the whore house that was over there and would get smashed up when stopping to ask the local negras for directions...a boy I know killed a white boy one night for calling him a ****** ....and I was only 6 years old when Isaiah so that killing happened in the early eighties...we fought a guerilla war down there man....*** whoopings were handed out on a regular basis on both sides and in my Daddy's time well some of us got hurt and some of them got hurt.....Mississippi is not as bad as a lot of folks would think but growing up in Mississippi will make you a hard man personally I love Mississippi with all my heart and soul and I will love it until Mississippi takes me back..theres nowhere I would rather have grown up and lived....I believe that a lot of us when looking to recapture our heritage overlook everything that happened in the south and go straight to Africa completely missing the beautiful things that happened during a bad time for us....we created our own culture down there...our own language, sayings, beliefs and music America's music was the blues our creation.......now however it's almost bad to say you're from the South or Mississippi...black folk in other parts of the country hear that and automatically think your ignorant, slow, uneducated, and if you're a man at least in my case they even try to test your manhood..it's funny how some of us want to know our culture but only the parts that we think are good..I stop my search for Black culture in the South in general and Mississippi in particular ..I want to know as much about my history here as I can, I've been to the crossroads area at home in Natchez and have seen where the slave market was , I've been to William Johnson's homesite( A black slave owner in Natchez) I've been to the tire plant where Wharlest Jackson was blown up because he was promoted to a white man's position in the plant...that's what I want not stories of my past as a king...hell from the way some folks tell it we were all kings and queens...give me my Mississippi and southern history, jim crow, black codes, and lynchings lest I forget where I really came from ....
     
  10. toylin

    toylin Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    I think we, as a younger generation, need to take it upon ourselves to learn about our history/culture. I LOVE hearing stories about my parents lives when they were younger. I can only hope that when my son gets a little older, he'll humor me, and let me tell my stories....

    History is in everything you do. Everything. Think about. Every dollar you spend came from somewhere. Every piece of clothing you put on in the morning, every piece of gum you chew.... Think about any scars you have on your body. They have stories, too.

    If more of us (in the 18-35 crowd) would ask our parents, our grandparents, our aunts, uncles.... WE would learn enough to change the world, if only we could come together. I remember the early 90's. when everyone was wearing an X cap, and no one knew what it meant.

    How many of us can name 5 countries in Africa? (And South Africa and Egypt do not count! :) ) Man, when I was in school, I met plenty of Black folks who thought Africa WAS a country!

    I'll close with this little antedote:

    On a field trip in high school (Greenfield Village for those who have been to Michigan.. the former home of Henry Ford, the museum dedicated to him, blah blah), it was a sunny day, but it was windy, and cool in the shade. A group of us were sitting around trying to enjoy lunch, in the shade. Most of us were shivering. I made the comment, "See, we need heat, cuz we're from Africa." Someone looked up and said, "I ain't from no [email protected] Africa.. I'm from Detroit."
     
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