Black People : Sudan is secret partner of U.S.

Discussion in 'Black People Open Forum' started by Mad Skillz, Jun 12, 2007.

  1. Mad Skillz

    Mad Skillz Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2004
    Messages:
    604
    Likes Received:
    251
    Occupation:
    Real Estate
    Location:
    So. Cal by way of L.I., New York
    Ratings:
    +251
    Khartoum supplies information to the CIA on insurgents in Iraq

    By Greg Miller and Josh Meyer
    Originally published June 11, 2007
    Washington // Sudan has secretly worked with the CIA to spy on the insurgency in Iraq - an example of how the United States has continued to cooperate with the Sudanese regime even while condemning its role in the killing of tens of thousands of civilians in Darfur.

    President Bush has condemned the killings in Darfur as genocide and has imposed sanctions on Sudan's government. But some critics say the administration has soft-pedaled the sanctions to preserve its extensive intelligence collaboration with Sudan.

    The relationship underscores the complex realities of the post-Sept. 11 world, in which the United States has relied heavily on intelligence and military cooperation from countries, including Sudan and Uzbekistan, that are considered pariah states for their records on human rights.

    "Intelligence cooperation takes place for a whole lot of reasons," said a U.S. intelligence official, who like others spoke on condition of anonymity when discussing intelligence assessments. "It's not always between people who love each other deeply."

    Sudan has become increasingly valuable to the United States since the Sept. 11 attacks because the Sunni Arab nation is a crossroads for Islamic militants making their way to Iraq and Pakistan.

    That steady flow of foreign fighters has provided cover for Sudan's Mukhabarat intelligence service to insert spies into Iraq, officials said.

    "If you've got jihadists traveling via Sudan to get into Iraq, there's a pattern there in and of itself that would not raise suspicion," said a former high-ranking CIA official familiar with Sudan's cooperation with the agency. "It creates an opportunity to send Sudanese into that pipeline."

    As a result, Sudan's spies have often been in better position than the CIA to gather information on al-Qaida's presence in Iraq, as well as on the activities of other insurgent groups.


    Blue eyes no use
    "There's not much that blond-haired, blue-eyed case officers from the United States can do in the entire Middle East, and there's nothing they can do in Iraq," said a second former CIA official familiar with Sudan's cooperation. "Sudanese can go places we don't go. They're Arabs. They can wander around."

    The officials declined to say whether the Mukhabarat has sent its own intelligence officers into the country, citing concern over the protection of sources and methods. They said that Sudan has assembled a network of informants in Iraq providing intelligence on the insurgency. Some may have been recruited as they traveled through the Sudanese capital, Khartoum.

    The U.S.-Sudan relationship goes beyond Iraq. Sudan has helped the United States track the turmoil in Somalia, working to cultivate contacts with militias and Islamic courts in an effort to locate al-Qaida suspects hiding there. Sudan also has provided extensive cooperation in counter-terrorism operations, acting on U.S. requests to detain suspects as they pass through Khartoum.

    Sudan gets a number of benefits in return. Its relationship with the CIA has given it an important back channel for communications with the U.S. government. The U.S. has also used this channel to lean on Sudan over the crisis in Darfur and for other issues.

    And at a time when Sudan is being condemned in the international community, its counterterrorism work has won precious praise. The U.S. State Department recently issued a report calling Sudan a "strong partner in the war on terror."

    Some critics accuse the Bush administration of being soft on Sudan for fear of jeopardizing the cooperation on counterterrorism. John Prendergast, the former director of African affairs for the National Security Council in the Clinton administration, called the latest sanctions announced by Bush last month "window dressing," designed to appear tough while putting little real pressure on Sudan to halt government-linked Arab militias from killing members of African tribes in Darfur.

    "One of the main glass ceilings on real significant action in response to the genocide in Darfur has been our growing relationship with authorities in Khartoum on counterterrorism," said Prendergast, now with the International Crisis Group. "It is the single biggest contributor to why the gap between rhetoric and action is so large."

    Continued..

    http://www.baltimoresun.com/news/nationworld/iraq/bal-te.sudan11jun11,0,7816375.story?track=rss
     
  2. torch

    torch Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2006
    Messages:
    185
    Likes Received:
    2
    Ratings:
    +2
    Now that the masks have came off these criminals will we accept what we see?
     
  3. Mad Skillz

    Mad Skillz Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2004
    Messages:
    604
    Likes Received:
    251
    Occupation:
    Real Estate
    Location:
    So. Cal by way of L.I., New York
    Ratings:
    +251
    Well my brother, unfortunately some have accepted the status quo especially those who run this government.

    Forget about politicians taking an active role against the Sudanese regime. We can write all the letters and emails we want (which I've done too many times to remember) to our elected officials however they refuse to do anything about the dire situation in Darfur unless you send them a check attached your letter. And maybe, just maybe they'll contact you regarding your concerns.
     
Loading...