Black People : Study suggests bias against 'black' names on resumes

Discussion in 'Black People Open Forum' started by MsInterpret, May 23, 2010.

  1. MsInterpret

    MsInterpret Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Study suggests bias against 'black' names on resumes
    HR Magazine, Feb, 2003 by Bill Leonard

    Employers may be selecting or overlooking prospective job candidates for interviews based on their potential race as suggested by names, according to a recent study by two professors from the University of Chicago and Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).

    To test whether employers might discriminate against job applicants with black-sounding names, associate professors of economics Marianne Bertrand with Chicago's Graduate School of Business and Sendhil Mullainathan with MIT conducted an elaborate experiment. They fabricated resumes for multiple "phantom" job seekers with common black and white names. The professors then sent out nearly 5,000 resumes for 1,300 job openings advertised in newspapers and on online job sites throughout Chicago and Boston.

    "We searched online and selected resumes of actual job seekers," says Bertrand. "We then used those to create models for several different realistic resumes with the appropriate education and experience needed for typical job openings advertised in newspapers."

    Most job openings for which the researchers sent resumes were administrative, sales, clerical and managerial positions. Bertrand and Mullainathan randomly assigned the applicants names common to either black men, black women, white men or white women and were careful not to send identical resumes to the same employer.

    READ MORE: http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m3495/is_2_48/ai_97873146/

     
  2. medusanegrita

    medusanegrita Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    So what else is old?

    They also assume Asian sounding names are more intelligent.

    Mexican sounding names are harder workers.

    If you are a man and show up at an interview without a wedding band - don't mention anything about kids, you'll look like an unstable ho... especially if you're a black man.

    If you're the female - same thing.

    The south doesn't hire single females for teachers (according to someone I know in TN who is divorced and getting her teaching license) - and you can tell if a woman is single during the first 5-10 minutes of an interview. She tells on herself. You have no idea how many mock interviews I've seen and black woman tells that she's a single mother like that is gonna put her in a positive light as a versatile and hard worker. IT DOESN'T. Quite the opposite - you look like a welfare ho.

    Employers often mistake African and Arabic names like Kalil and Malik to be African American names, avoid using them if you can. Use your middle name or something else.

    If you're name is Jerome, they are gonna think you are black.

    Bertha sounds fat.

    Any variation of Sheniqua and they are gonna think you are ghetto.... even with a degree. With a degree they are just gonna think you got due to affirmative action in the school.

    READ QUESTIONS ABOUT CONVICTIONS, FELONIES, AND POLICE RECORDS CAREFULLY!
    1) If they ask about 'convictions in the last 10 years' and you haven't had any CONVICTIONS in the last 10 years, the answer is no. Does not matter if you have felonies, went to jail last week, or whatever.... if you have no convictions and this is all the question ask, answer NO.

    2. Don't offer more information than necessary. Don't put on your application that you got a felony charge in '98 for knocking your baby-momma upside the head with a gun when she threatened to run over you with the car on 8th street in Birmingham and you got 6 years for that. The only thing you need to put are the name of the conviction and the date of the conviction. Don't put how long you served in jail/prison unless you are asked that in an interview. Again, no more information that necessary, keep negative stuff to a minimum and ALWAYS play it up with something positive like the classes you took in jail, the side work you did, or something, and what positive stuff you been involved in since you got out.

    3. If you have felony or criminal history, it's almost imperative that you put something positive in the 'additional comments' section.

    4. If they asked you have ever been convicted of a felony, don't put anything about misdemeanors if they haven't asked.



    Keep your tiddies covered. Unless your trying to get a porn job.


    Shake hands firmly, always ask for a business card at the end of the interview.


    On 2nd thought... what the hell do I know? I don't have a job. My advice is useless.


    oh well. Don't heed any of this, go ahead and screw up. You might get lucky... more lucky than me.

    Where the hell is 100 Black Women when you need it :rolleyes:
     
  3. Kemetstry

    Kemetstry going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    :fyi:


    It isnt suggested. It's a fact. So for all of you that stick their kids with those ghetto names.......



    :geek:












    :em0200:

     
  4. medusanegrita

    medusanegrita Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    I knew that was coming. It's inevitable in a thread that talks about black people and names.

    I will take a 'ghetto names' any day over Sally, Sue, Becky, Ralph, Bob, Harry and D*ck.
     
  5. warriorprincess

    warriorprincess Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    I love African and African-Arabic names.

    They are generally rich with meaning and very melodic to the ears.

    I believe that giving a child a name that is rich in meaning is the equivalent of speaking something into existence before it can manifest.


    It doesnt always happen like a math equation but the idea speaks to the power of words.

    Its great information to know that people will discriminate us because of our names. Without this information, a person can be confused on why she is not getting any call-backs even given outstanding qualifications.

    However, I see this is as just one more challenge on top of many that upon meeting it, has the potential to make us that much greater.
     
  6. Kemetstry

    Kemetstry going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    And that's fine. Just deal with the consequences of your actions.

    You want to name your kid Gwuanetta or Trevon, by your own admission, you have knowingly hamstrung them.















    :em0200:

     
  7. awo dino

    awo dino Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    It's black peoples fault, not the system of white supremacy!!
    name your kids bob and sue. be like mike - the white one.
     
  8. Khasm13

    Khasm13 STAFF STAFF

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    when i moved to florida i could not even sniff a job in my field with a name like khari...when i did get an interview and they saw my dreadlocks i couldn't even get a response back...at least in chicago i get bites on my resume....

    one love
    khasm
     
  9. medusanegrita

    medusanegrita Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Not just names then but hair too.

    I guess some would say we need 'white looking hair' to get ahead and not have any black, ghetto, or African hair.

    No plaits.

    No locs.

    No 'unnatural' colors.

    Get relaxed.

    Get conked

    Make it straight.

    This is how I feel about it..... if you discriminate against me for my name and my hair and any such thang, do I really want to work for you in the first place?

    Likely answer - NO!

    Job satisfaction with the least stress factor is HIGHLY important to me. If someone is discriminatory it shows in their management and work ethic after you are hired. I don't want the extra stress of working with someone that is racist, blatantly bias, or prejudice. I just wanna relax all the way around and I want peace of mind.

    So by all means, if they discriminate against me for my name, my hair, my race, etc...., then maybe they should. It means we would not be a good match as employer/employee and we both should find someone more accommodating to our needs. It may mean I have to work harder and longer at looking for a job, but in the hope and long run... not only do I land what I need and what I want... but I land one that is a good match for my personality, character, and motivations.

    My name is not 'ghetto' or 'black' but it does pretty much designate me as an AA woman. Most of the people I know with it or have heard with it are black. And it does come with own set of preconceived notions - mainly funny, no 'common sense,' and perhaps a little bit dense. I have no problem with any of those notions.

    And I like the name Khari. My son has a very similar name arising out of it. I used a similar name-basis and tweaked it to make it my own.
     
  10. Full Speed

    Full Speed Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    This is a reality we cannot get around. There is no legislation that can be passed to solve this problem.

    I suggest we start our own companies. I don't favor always being dependent upon them for our livelyhood.
     
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