Black People : SPITTIN' ACID AT THE SISTERS:THE ASSAULT ON WOMEN IN RAP...

Discussion in 'Black People Open Forum' started by Isaiah, Dec 30, 2005.

  1. Isaiah

    Isaiah Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Spittin' Acid at the Sistahs: Rap(e) & The Assault of Black Women
    By Ewuare Osayande


    Are rap lyrics responsible for sexual assault against Black women?



    Hardly anyone in the Black community would advocate, support or sanction the rape and sexual assault of Black women; yet everyday Black women are being assaulted by Black male rappers, hip hop culture and the recording industry that condones, supports and profits from it.

    From the lyrics on the radio to the videos on the tube, Black male rappers engage in an aural and visual assault on the minds and bodies of Black women. This cultural attack on Black women would warrant a state-of-emergency even if the madness began and ended in the studios, but it doesn't. More and more, Black men and boys are reciting these lyrics until they become the mental script that directs their interactions with Black women even as these tracks
    advocate the real-life hatred and violence toward women.

    But what Nelly and his fellow rap cohorts fail to realize is that for every time they swipe a credit card through a Black female's behind and cash in on this oppressive profit-making scam, someone else is swiping one through their own ***** as they remain bent in the position of submission to a system that views them as property too.
    At face value, many would dismiss my description and assessment as being over the top, but upon close examination, one will realize that the critical condition of the situation cannot be overstated. My words fall way short of capturing the deadly effect misogynistic rap is having on Black women. The fact is that what many rappers are spewing is criminal by most societies' standards.

    According to Black's Law Dictionary sexual assault is defined as "Any willful attempt or threat to inflict injury upon the person of another, when coupled with an apparent present ability so to do, and any intentional display of force such as would give the victim reason to fear or expect immediate bodily harm, constitutes an assault. An assault may be committed without actually or striking, or doing bodily harm, to the person of another." (p. 114)

    As the definition clarifies, assault doesn't need actual physical contact to be considered such. The mere threat of violence is all that is required. Clearly what rap has become, what it constitutes and perpetuates is a direct threat to Black women who relate to men who listen to and are persuaded by a music that prides itself on being the epitome of reality, not the studio-contrived production that it really is. Given this, Black women walk under the constant threat of being preyed upon by men that step to the beat of a sampled drum loop produced by platinum-laced pied pipers who proclaim themselves pimps.

    The combination of violent lyrics and pornographic images result in a poisonous concoction that is literally numbing our youth to the deadly ramifications of what the record industry has made rap to be. Increasingly rap is becoming synonymous with rape as record execs are using rap to violate the minds of our youth with pornographic images even as it works to justify and perpetuate the actual rape of Black women.

    What becomes clear through all of this is the role of the state and the corporate structure in producing an image of Black women as "*****/ho" to substantiate their continued subjugation for the purpose of their economic exploitation. For example, if the corporate structure can convince young Black women at an early age that prostituting one's body is not a bad life-choice and the state denies the majority of them access to a sound education and economic opportunity even as it demonizes them for making that "choice," then the role becomes a self-perpetuating prophecy that gets fulfilled with each successive generation. In so doing, this
    form of social entrapment will ensure that elite men can reap the illicit economic benefits of this debilitating cycle.

    Manning Marable describes in particular detail how this process emerged as it relates to the racist/sexist image of Black women and the impact that image would have on their actual lives.

    "The Depression and war years produced within the popular culture the figure of the Sapphire: a Black woman who was 'evil, treacherous, bitchy, stubborn, and hateful.' The Sapphire stereotype was utilized by White males, who 'could justify their dehumanization and sexual exploitation of Black women,' and by males, who could reasonably 'claim that they could not get along with Black women because they were so evil.'" (p. 85)

    Today, this has manifested in an inter-racial alliance of White and Black men who are reaping tremendous profits from the overt exploitation of this sexualized Sapphire stereotype. In truth it is a tri-racial alliance as many Asian execs, producers, writers, and artists are attempting to cash in on the crass display of subjugated Black female sexuality. As such, this capitalist assembly line production of CDs, DVDs and magazines amounts to a gang rape of Black female identity.

    The now infamous image of a man swiping a credit card through the crack of a Black female's backside in rap star Nelly's video "Tip Drill" exposes the way these rappers, the recording industry and their eager clientele view Black women: as commodity, as property. Period. Their value is only determined by the degree that they can be violated.

    But what Nelly and his fellow rap cohorts fail to realize is that for every time they swipe a credit card through a Black female's behind and cash in on this oppressive profit-making scam, someone else is swiping one through their own ***** as they remain bent in the position of submission to a system that views them as property too. But then again, maybe they do realize it, and just fail to care given the amount of fame and fortune that has come their way. But
    what we must realize is that there are millions of Black girls who are being violated in the name of hip hop culture and reap no profit from it whatsoever. And so the question that faces the Black community is: Do we care?

    The lines between what is art and what is reality are blurring when artists' marketability is based on a street credibility that they are expected to tote. And in too many cases Black women are the casualties of their rap mantra of "keeping it real."

    It has become an expectation that every gangsta rapper's CD will have an obligatory "Beat that Ho" song in their rap repertoire. Gangsta rappers take the persona of the pimp as their
    street archetype of choice. To be a pimp means that the possibility of slapping, beating or otherwise assaulting a woman is just a look or a word away. This valorization of violence sits at the center of the current image of the rapper. And many rappers are being turned out by an industry that is invested in keeping Black men in the role of violent-prone sexual predator.

    50 Cent, one of the most popular rappers on the scene today, is heard intimidating a woman on his 2003 top ten track, " P.I.M.P." that stayed in rotation on radio for weeks upon its
    release:

    ***** choose with me, I'll have you stripping in the street/
    Put my other hoes down, you get your *** beat/
    Now Nick is my bottom *****, she always come up with my bread/
    The last ***** she was with put stitches in her head.

    Beanie Sigel's "Watch Your *******" from his Def Jam release entitled The Reason takes an even more morbid turn when he threatens a woman with

    bye bye *****/
    **** that red dress on/
    get a head step on/
    speed on before you get peed on/
    when I piss I don't miss/
    get mad, scratch your *** and get glad/
    before I scratch your *** and get Glad bags/
    throw your **** out on the trash.

    The celebrated rap producer Dr. Dre is heard in his rap "Housewife" from the CD Dr. Dre 2001 saying,

    Naw *** is short for honey/
    almost had her wailing like Bunny/
    telling tales of being pregnant, catching Nordstrom sales with abortion money/
    I spotted her seeing her with my ****** when I shot at her.

    On Lil John's track "******* Aint ****" from the popular Crunk Juice CD, he regurgitates the master/slave relationship with him, a Black man, assuming the role of the master with the Black
    woman as his slave.

    Acting all sophisticated spending money that she didn't make/
    I get so mad that I could slap her acting like she Cleopatra/
    aint no need to ask she's a slave to the money and I'm the master.

    Snoop Doggy Dogg has an entire track about beating women on his latest CD R&G: (Rhythm and Gangsta) The Masterpiece. The rap, "Can U Control Yo ***" has Snoop schooling another guy on how to beat the woman he is living with. The chorus is instructive in its brutality:

    Can you control your ***? (You got a ***** that won't obey what you say)/
    You can't control your ***? (She hardheaded, she just won't obey)/
    Can you control your *** (You've got to know what to do, what to say)/
    You've got to put that ***** in her place, even if it's slapping her in her face/
    Ya got to control your ***/
    Can you control your ***?

    Later in the track he says,

    What kind of pimp holds back?/
    Never met a ***** that a pimp can't slap/
    What's wrong with pimpin'?

    This is the same Snopp Dogg that gets featured in movies and commercials selling fabric softener! It is also the same Snoop Dogg that produces porn and "Girls Gone Wild" videos. These self-admitted womanizers and women-beaters are rewarded and celebrated in our society, and we see nothing wrong with this?



    CLICK ON THE WEB ADDRESS FOR MORE OF THIS ARTICLE

    http://www.seeingblack.com/2005/x042905/spittin_acid.shtml


    PEACE!
    ISAIAH
     
  2. spicybrown

    spicybrown Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Controversy At It's Worst.....

    Every being on this planet is responsible for their actions, with an exception of mentally retarted people. IMO, the rap lyrics you hear nowadays are all for gain and profit. I'm sure these rappers, male&female have actually experienced the bitter reality of their choice lyrics. What better way to grab the public's attention than to go against the grain of harmony. It's all an infinite pimp&ho3 industry, that's what makes this system go round, IMO. I've noticed when a record label is owned and operated by blacks like Cash Money, and No Limit......they degrade women far less than the commercial Producers. Perhaps it stems from the southern hospitality ideal of the two above mentioned. Nobody in America, let alone the world over is interested in Black affairs, unless they can get a knee-slapping laugh out of it. I've even noticed that after the Katrina horrors, and "Tookie's" execution, I receive more stares of pity from whites. SAD. BW the world over are the universal punching bag, moreso than BM, because they are seen in a defenseless light. People can look down on us and say :At least I'm not Black and/or woman!!" So when a "rapper" does his thizzle, most people are glad that they are confirming what they've felt all along about the Black race, particularly, BW. Not to be uppity, but the hip-hop culture has gotten so out-of-hand that when I pass a group of obvious young Black hip-hoppers, NONE of them can look me in the eye, even upon a simple "HELLO"!! Is this because the image of an upright BW is as rare as a four leaf clover?!?! I certainly hope not. A lot of these young Black "rappers" know disrespecting women/Black is the only way to relate to WM, so they do it for Brownie Points, perhaps.
     
  3. Isaiah

    Isaiah Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    My beautiful sister, I agee with you, and that is why I posted the article, so we could address it reasonably among ourselves... But I have to ask you how you could justify what you are saying here, about Lil Jon and Fiddy and Snoop Dog, but hold a TUPAC in such high esteem in the thread about him down in the Entertainment Forum??? Is there really a qualitative difference between those lyrics up above, and I GET AROUND???

    Isn't a similar message being sent out in the lyrics of that song??? Also, his actions with that sister, which as I recall, were caught on video tape...how do you reconcile holding one of these guys in high regard, and the others catch your disgust??? Talk to me...


    Peace!
    Isaiah
     
  4. jamesfrmphilly

    jamesfrmphilly going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    it's so sad.........

    i see the problem but i do not see a solution.
    issues such as this are why i consider black people to be in a very bad state right now even though some of us are making a lot of money.
    it almost seems as though one gets paid more if you degrade your own.

    I've never known black people to be in such a low state.
    it saddens me.
     
  5. $$RICH$$

    $$RICH$$ Lyon King Admin. STAFF

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    It's truely sad that we are mentally at this state of mind
    and push to leave lyrical maze upon younger bruthas that
    this so cool and right.

    Men have to start thinking IMO.
     
  6. MANASIAC

    MANASIAC Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    I got to second Brother Omo.
     
  7. jamesfrmphilly

    jamesfrmphilly going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    i wonder where the young brothers get these types of ideas from?:uzi:
     
  8. Khasm13

    Khasm13 STAFF STAFF

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    everyone has a choice with their daily beliefs...
    it's just too bad that too many of us are sheep...

    just because you hear someone calling a black women a b**** or a h** doesn't mean that you must follow along...
    but unfortunately that is the plight of the human race and i believe that it will eventually be the death of us all...99.99% of us are followers...imho

    one love
    khasm
     
  9. Isaiah

    Isaiah Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Brother Khasm, JUST BECAUSE???

    Our sisters are not two-legged dogs... That is what a ***** is, and that is what these knuckeheaded fools have chosen to call BLACK WOMEN, and we all up in here making excuses for them... When your mama, your daughter, your sister is nothing but a ***** to you, I'm sorry to say it, but you deserve to be treated like the dog you see others as... That is not Isaiah's opinon, that is the law of the universe... Ignorance of that law is no excuse, either...

    Brother Omowale and Manasiac, granted the sisters are outta order, but are you brothers daring to say that you can find lyrics out here directed at men like the ones up above??? Show a brother the money...(smile!)


    Peace!
    isaiah
     
  10. Destee

    Destee destee.com STAFF

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    I knew it wouldn't take long. It never seems to fail.

    Mention the damage being done by Brothers, and Sisters' faults are quickly put on the table.

    Even when they are negligible in comparison.

    It's a sign, when one's challenges can't be discussed or resolved, without pointing fingers at others.

    :heart:

    Destee
     
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