Black People : Spike Lee's Message To The Younger Generation(s):

Discussion in 'Black People Open Forum' started by chuck, Oct 5, 2009.

  1. chuck

    chuck Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    >
    > The Brown Daily Herald > Campus News
    >
    > Spike Lee: Blame rap

    > Director says hip-hop culture distracts from education

    > By Simon van Zuylen-Wood
    >
    >
    > Updated: Sunday, April 12, 2009
    >
    >
    > Quinn Savit
    >
    > Spike Lee spoke to a packed Salomon 101 about problems
    > facing blacks today.
    > He wore a New York Yankees cap and warmed up the audience
    > with a jab at the New England Patriots. But, turning
    > serious, award-winning film director Spike Lee expressed
    > concern about the misguided values some blacks live by today
    > in a speech last night.
    >
    > Lee focused on film, hip-hop and the importance of
    > education and hard work in the black community in his
    > lecture to an enthusiastic crowd in a packed Salomon 101.
    >
    > "No matter what you want to do, if you want to achieve that
    > dream, you have to bust your ***," Lee said. "I'm very
    > fortunate (to be successful) because my first two years I
    > wasn't doing anything in school."
    >
    > Lee, who attended historically black Morehouse College in
    > Atlanta, said a major problem with the education of blacks
    > was the notion that being smart was equivalent to being
    > white.
    >
    > "If you speak correct English, get good grades, you get
    > ostracized as being a sellout," Lee said. While he was
    > growing up in Brooklyn in the 1970s, "you got major props if
    > you were smart. No one would call you a white boy or white
    > girl if you got A's."
    >
    > Lee said he blamed the rap industry for discouraging blacks
    > from hard work and studying. At one point, "it was against
    > the law for African-Americans to learn how to read and
    > write," Lee said. Now, rap music and videos spread the
    > notion that "ignorant is being black ... gangsta ...
    > ghetto."
    >
    > Lee, who said he had "no idea (he) wanted to be a
    > filmmaker," credited his surroundings for his early success.
    > Lee was raised in Brooklyn by his mother, an art teacher,
    > and his father, a jazz musician. He said he first starting
    > filming the summer after his sophomore year of college in
    > 1977.
    >
    > That summer in New York City, Lee said he filmed a
    > "blackout," "blacks and Puerto Ricans looting," "the first
    > summer of disco" and the Son of Sam serial killer scare.
    >
    > "I had all this footage and no idea what to do with it,"
    > Lee said, adding that the material eventually inspired him
    > to become a mass communications major.
    >
    > Lee broke onto the film scene with late 1980s indie hits
    > "She's Gotta Have It" and "Do the Right Thing," and has
    > recently scored big with 2006's "Inside Man," which was
    > critically acclaimed.
    >
    > Despite his recent success, Lee says it's still difficult
    > to get financing for films about blacks.
    >
    > "Hollywood will finance a certain type of African-American
    > film," Lee said, referring to "bang-bang" gangster movies
    > and "lowbrow comedy."
    >
    > "Tyler Perry has a film every month coming out," Lee
    > quipped.
    >
    > Resolved to show "not just the pretty pictures but the ugly
    > stuff too" about the black experience, Lee plugged his
    > latest film, which is about black soldiers in World War II.
    >
    >
    > Lee said black soldiers faced racial prejudice while
    > serving in the military, adding, "even today, in Iraq - I
    > know how I feel about this war."
    >
    > After a pause, Lee then smiled and recited presidential
    > candidate Barack Obama's slogan, "Yes we can" to a wildly
    > cheering crowd.
    >
    > "Just the thought of someone like Barack being president of
    > these United States - I still wake up in the morning
    > scratching my head," Lee said. "My grandmother - I know she
    > went to heaven knowing this day would never come."
    >
    > Kibwe Chase-Marshall '11 said Lee's voice resounded loudly
    > on issues beyond film.
    >
    > "While you might have another director here to give
    > insights on why to opt for a dolly shot or a pan, (Lee) can
    > offer things that are a lot more valuable in a cultural
    > context," he said.
    >
    > Reginald Cole '10 said that "as a speaker trying to talk to
    > a Brown crowd, (Lee) couldn't necessarily go into depth
    > about" certain subjects.
    >
    > The Brown community, which Lee told The Herald is
    > "together" and "always has fun," was receptive of him, as
    > dozens of students crowded Lee for autographs after his
    > speech, which was sponsored by the Brown Lecture Board.
    >
    > "Absolutely genius," said Dami Olatunji '11. "I can't stay
    > awake from most lectures - but I stayed awake for this
    > one."

    > The Brown Daily Herald, Inc.

    Copyright © 1994-2009

    All rights reserved.
     
  2. Jahari Kavi

    Jahari Kavi Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    spike's my man, but as dead prez says...."it's bigger than hip hop".................
     
  3. Ankhur

    Ankhur Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    I may be an old fogie, but...

    ....I could not stand Hip Hop until Public Enemy and Poor Righteous Teacher, or Dance Hall until, Bobo Dreads returned the style to culture and Africa.

    Everyone during the 70s talked a certain way and did this and that at home but when they got up to perform, they made sure they looked and said and sang things that were not too offensive, and that caveat was for George Clinton.
    No one could have ever told us as teens during the 70s that,
    Black babies and toddlers would grow up in a community were folks would actualy buy records celebrating the degredation of the Black community,
    the abuse of our women, and then make more money then all of the Motown and Gamble and Huff stars ut together doing it.

    Colonization starts with an ambiguous good and evil concept, perpetrated on a people with a natural value sytem.
    Hip Hop started out as fun talk but when folks sttrted to get political about it, then the powers that be, particularly the Bronfman Jewish mafia family(Death Row) in Cali, saw fit to introduce Gangsta rap which celebrated a kind of bloodlust and fratricide on the level of what was going on in the Congo and Liberia at the time.
    As the freedom fighters in Zimbabwe, listened to Bob Marley for inspiration, the child-soldiers in the Congo, listened to Onyx and NWA as they chopped up every man, woman and child insight,
    for the sake of Belgium and US corporate interests .
     
  4. chuck

    chuck Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    On point....

    On time!

    Well said...

    Well written...

    Thanks...

    Later..

    Peace...
     
  5. Rahim

    Rahim Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    why is rap music being blamed for this? what about bad parenting, and other moral examples?

    the parents are the first teachers a child knows...
     
  6. Ankhur

    Ankhur Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Simple mathematics
    youth are more programed by youth culture during the natural psycholgical process of youth rebeliousness.
    The music of the 70s focused rebeliousness agianst that which was trying to destroy or harm the community
    the rap music in SOME INSTANCES celebrates doing such activities and uses youth rebeliousness, against the community, parents and elders.
    No other music actualy celebrated and then described in detail, how to abuse, and degrade a Black woman into prostitution, or how to purchase and then distribute soul harming narcotics through out ones own community!
     
  7. Khasm13

    Khasm13 STAFF STAFF

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    yes indeed....

    one love
    khasm
     
  8. RAPTOR

    RAPTOR Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Yes.

    However, if the parents are not good teachers, then what chance to their children have?

    And what do we do about those parents who are poor teachers to their children?
     
  9. chuck

    chuck Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Chuck:

    In all due candor and honesty?

    Time and again, when any serious criticism gets directed at and towards people and things your generations don't like to be challenged about:

    Your folks get awfully defensive--and a few inexcusably offensive--ad naseum...

    Y'know , there is a big difference, i. e., between just reacting or overeacting, instead of responding to the challenges implied or suggested, as in--if you truly intend to set the record straight-- etc.

    I'm about communicating not confrontations:

    I'm also about doing and saying things to bridge the obvious generation gaps, not make them wider...

    CTJ
     
  10. chuck

    chuck Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    I am pleased and elated by your participation on my thread!

    :toast:
     
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