Black People : Some Visions Towards a Black Silicon Valley

Discussion in 'Black People Open Forum' started by Ankhur, Dec 5, 2011.

  1. Ankhur

    Ankhur Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    George Fraser grips the edge of his lectern, with a stern face, and stares out at the 100 or so black people sitting in the Rutgers Business School auditorium. The black, Cleveland, Ohio businessman says that on his way to this conference — a gathering to talk about economic development in urban communities — he received divine inspiration. “God told me to tell you today that you have everything you need to be successful, and that he’s not giving you anything else, until you learn to use what you have,” he yells. Laughter and applause ensue. Then Fraser cites statistics to substantiate his claim that black Americans have and spend enough money to create high growth businesses and jobs. Black America currently spends $1 trillion a year, making it the 16th largest economy in the world, according to the State of the African-American Consumer Report. The problem is that we’re not investing our money in our communities, Fraser says. “DuBois predicted that if just 10 percent of African-Americans rose up, got an education, and became middle class, they would uplift the entire community. We’ve surpassed his dream,” he says, citing statistics indicating that at least 17 percentof African-Americans have four-year degrees. “We have a lot of PhDs in America. What we need is Ph Dos.”
    While Occupy Wall Street was planning yesterday’s protest aimed at shutting down the street itself and taking over New York City subways, across the Hudson River — in Newark, New Jersey — a different approach to wealth inequality was being articulated. How to do that is a longstanding and seemingly perpetual debate in black America and has sparked several initiatives. But unlike past initiatives, the organizers of this one are asking black Americans to focus not just on entrepreneurship, but to collaborate on building innovative high growth companies in urban areas. “This will require a change in our mindset,” says Chad Womack, co-founder of The America21 Project, the leaders of the initiative and the co-organizers of the conference. “Take the 8-track out of your mind and put in a Blu Ray DVD.”
    Currenly, black people make up less than 1.5 percent of Silicon Valley’s workforce, Womack says, a problem that recently received intense media scrutiny after the airing of CNN’s documentary “Black In America: The New Promised Land — Silicon Valley.” Yet, the problem goes beyond Silicon Valley. Terry Hicks sees our absence from technology entrepreneurship in Pennsylvania, where he oversees the investment activities for Ben Franklin Technology Partners of Pennsylvania, a State of Pennsylvania supported economic development corporation. Of the 120 companies in Ben Franklin’s portfolio, Hicks says none have black founders.

    http://www.dominionofnewyork.com/2011/11/18/how-to-build-a-black-silicon-valley/#.TtzsfFZoeXY
     
  2. Gorilla

    Gorilla Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Wait until they figure out that most of them aren't women either. Nice article.
     
  3. Ankhur

    Ankhur Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Seems to be a powerful move to employ many in the innercities, and hopefully some good reciprocal trade agreements with African nations for "Fair Trade" coltan and lithium
     
  4. Gorilla

    Gorilla Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    The way I look at it is this. As a nation, we're deciding to let some potential innovators/brain power to go untapped. It's good to see incubators that are focusing on specific marginalized groups, but I think it's time people acknowledge that there are some issues with the STEM education environment and workplace that are turning people who are capable off.
     
  5. Ankhur

    Ankhur Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Most Def; No Child Left Behind is leaving every child behind.

    Children need to be intelectualy and creatively stimulated in schools to grow up to create computer systems and programs,
    not treated as computers, which is what this test only and non hands on approach is doing!

    Most of the hands on and brains on stuff has been removed and memory seems to be the only criteria neccessary for rote learning.

    Hell started when they took problem solving out of math, essay writing out of English, debate out of speech, lab classes out of science, and cut out civics, music and art, home economics and shop classes
     
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