Black Women : So the secret is out...

Discussion in 'Black Women - Mothers - Sisters - Daughters' started by dustyelbow, Jul 5, 2006.

  1. dustyelbow

    dustyelbow Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Relax, You Can Fix A Bad Hair Day

    POSTED: 3:49 pm EDT June 27, 2006
    UPDATED: 4:53 pm EDT June 27, 2006
    Email This Story | Print This Story
    There's no way around it. This is a bad hair week in the Delaware Valley.

    A few years ago, researchers from Yale University discovered that men and women feel less confident, less smart and even embarrassed on days when their hair won't behave.

    But local stylists say people should relax, because there is a way to make the best of bad-hair days.

    When it is humid, hair begins absorbing water from the air, causing the bond between hair molecules to shift, creating curls, swirls and frizz.

    "Use what Mother Nature gave you. Don't fight it. Let your curls be curls," said Jason Demers, of the Salon L'Etoile and Spa.

    But if straight hair is all you dream of during the worst of the wet weather, there are things that can help.

    Products like leave-in conditioners help fight frizz, but make sure they don't have alcohol in them.

    A flat iron can also be used.

    "That way it will help to prevent it from getting curly or frizzy sooner," Demers said.

    A chemical treatment is another trick for taming bad hair.

    "Relaxer will relax your curl to the point that it will control it in humid situations, but if you get thermal reconditioning -- that is the Japanese straightening -- that prevents all forms of curl, frizz, everything," Demers said.

    Read the rest here....
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    Oh is this SO...

    A UNLOVING UNACCEPTING EDUCATED PEOPLE of GREATER SOCIETY knows this...WOW

    Is that right, there some Japanese in there (the hair) TOO...

    Wait I'm not finished

     
  2. dustyelbow

    dustyelbow Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Black Girls Going Blonde a Growing Trend at HU
    By: Sonja Summers
    Issue date: 3/3/05 Section: Campus

    The number of blonds attending Howard is starting to increase according to some students, but they do not mean that White enrollment at the University has gone up.

    Instead, they believe the number of Black girls opting for blond hair is rising and can be seen in Black women who dye or highlight their hair blond.

    While some students think the added color is an attempt to keep up with the latest trends, others claim it is an effort to appear more Eurocentric.

    "I feel some do it because they need a change," said senior physical education major Stephen Robinson. "They feel the more extreme the better, and blond, for some, is extreme."

    Sophomore criminal justice and Spanish double major Leigh Anderson thinks Black women dye their hair to meet the European standards of beauty.

    "Everybody always says it is to make it more manageable and stuff, but at that time white women were the pinnacle of beauty," Robinson said. "After being slaves, I doubt that straightening our hair and making it easier to manage was top priority, it was all about survival and looking like the people that were surviving at that time."

    Junior film production major Yasmen Howell admits to dying her hair blond and suggests that Black females choose their hair color by seeing which hair color is most prominent in music videos.

    Read the rest here
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    Howard University. Historical Black College. A bit old 2005, I had a recent article on black women and blonde hair but I will substitute with this until I find it.

    Oh is this SO...

    Is there really some RUTHLESS WHITE'S GOLDEN DOME in there (hair) too.

    Wait, I am not FINISHED.
     
  3. dustyelbow

    dustyelbow Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Hair Straightening
    Author: Andy Lewis
    Hair Straightening

    The most recent and advanced technique of permanent hair straightening is known as Japanese hair straightening (also called thermal conditioning). This system was brought to the U.S. from Japan in 1998. It’s kinder to the hair than the old treatments which used hydroxides and lye. Various supporting products and treatments have been developed since 1998 which make this the leading hair straightening technique.

    How do I know if hair straightening will work for me?

    Look for a hair stylist who is specifically trained to work with hair straightening. She’ll be able to assess your hair and give you a suggestion. Not all hair types are suited for traditional straightening, but the new Japanese hair treatment will work well on almost everybody’s hair.

    What hair products are used?

    There are 5 kinds of hair products used:

    · Chemical hair relaxer formula
    · Neutralizer
    · Petroleum cream
    · Shampoos designed specifically for relaxers
    · Hair relaxing conditionerss

    These will be customized to your hair’s requirements.

    How long does it take?

    Anywhere from 3 ½ to 6 hours. There are 4 main steps to the procedure:

    1. To avoid any chemical burning, a protective petroleum cream may be applied to protect the scalp and also to your hair it it’s been previously relaxed or damaged.

    2. A chemical hair relaxer is then applied to loosen, soften, and relax your natural curls. If your hair is overly porous or slightly damaged from being previously over-processed, your stylist may use a conditioner-filler before applying the relaxer. The relaxer is left on for the right amount of time for your hair, and then thoroughly rinsed out with warm water.

    3. Then a neutralizer is applied to your hair to oxidize and restore its pH level. This is because if the relaxer created too high a pH (too alkaline), your hair could swell and break.

    4. Next, a conditioner is applied. There are two types, the cream conditioners and the protein or liquid conditioners. The best type will be used for your hair, to restore some of its natural oils.

    Read the rest here
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    Oh is this SO...

    Japanese want you to use their products.

    Interesting.

    I have a Japanese correspondent and he mentioned this and was used for black women with "nappy hair"

    He knows about the term "NAPPY"

    I did not reveal it too him, but HE REVEALED IT to ME.

    Maybe HIP HOP and its BOASTING of ACCEPTABLE BLACK BEAUTY STANDARDS made it all POSSIBLE.

    Wait I am not FINISHED.
     
  4. dustyelbow

    dustyelbow Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Posted July 05, 2006 12:22 PM
    What Your Hair Says About You
    What Your Hair Says - THE VIDEO WATCH IT
    Lauri Martin

    We wash it, we style it, we dye it. Hair. It's what many women spend hours perfecting. Whether long, straight, short or curly, a woman's hair can say a lot, at least according to one author.

    Rose Weitz wrote a book called “Rapunzel's Daughters”, which breaks down, what she said, is the truth underneath the roots. So what exactly does your hair say about you?

    "We will choose hairstyles based on which cultural stereotype they want to fit into." In Weitz' book, women can send a subliminal message through their locks. For some, they use their hair to grab a man's attention, to show creativity or to get a job. Others use their hair to reveal a part of themselves.

    Weitz said in our society, blonde hair is viewed as more feminine, but maybe not as smart. Brown or black hair, just the opposite. Red hair: funny, feisty, but angrier. Long hair: not as professional. Short hair: kind of masculine, yet powerful.

    Read the rest here...

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    Oh is this SO...

    If this is where we get our QUES or TIPS from, we are FOLLOWING "ruthless" WHITE into CULTURAL HELL.

    Being a BLONDE EQUALS BEING MORE FEMININE.

    Being BLACK HAIR is NOT SO FEMININE it seems.

    But if we want to be perceived as NOT AS SMART then BE THE BEST AT IT.

    OH WELL for all WOMEN who use "ruthless" white and greater society as JUDGE.

    WAIT I am not FINISHED....
     
  5. dustyelbow

    dustyelbow Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    THE 'BLACK HAIR' INTERVIEW WITH ARON RANEN: The white guy who uncovered the Korean domination of the black hair industry
    July 5, 2006


    *Aron Ranen is a gifted filmmaker and professor who has received a litany of accolades for his groundbreaking documentaries, along with a couple of fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts.

    Here he talks about his latest opus, Black Hair, an incendiary expose’ which is currently generating plenty of conversation in African-American communities all across the country.

    His eye-opening investigation revealed that Koreans have come to control virtually every aspect of the multi-billion dollar, black hair care industry, from manufacturing to distribution to retail sales, while simultaneously employing tactics to put African-American merchants and wholesalers out of business.

    (Look for a review of the film in tomorrow's EUR.)

    Kam Williams: How did a white guy like you develop an interest in the black hair care industry?

    Aron Ranen: I made a TV pilot with an African-American host, comedian Chey Bell who also happens to cut hair. She told me about all the dollars black women spend on their hair. I was amazed, and decided to make a fun film about that. But when I began shooting in Oakland at a hair expo, I met some black folks who told me of the Korean takeover.

    KW: How did you decide to make a movie about it?

    AR: I knew that the black hair biz has the potential to bring dollars and employment to inner city neighborhoods. I decided that if my skills as a filmmaker can help, then that's my path.

    KW: Did you learn a lot about the history of the industry as you researched the subject?

    AR: You should have seen my reaction when someone first told me about Madame CJ Walker...I mean, come on...this thing is fixable, doable and the film can help. And I hope Oprah leaves her legacy, just like Madame CJ, and opens up a thousand black beauty supply shops with training, and product discounts for the employees.

    KW: Were you surprised to learn the extent of Korean domination of the hair care market?

    AR: No.

    KW: Why did you put your movie on the Internet in several installments?

    AR: To comply with the rules of YouTube.com (scroll down to see the video).

    KW: Won't that hurt potential film sales?

    AR: Perhaps… Is there money in documentary?

    KW: Ask Michael Moore. He made over $100 million with Fahrenheit 9/11. Is what the Koreans are doing, the way they’ve gone about taking control of the manufacture, wholesale distribution and retail sales of black hair-care products illegal?

    AR: We would need help from the NAACP to determine that. I am a filmmaker not an attorney.

    KW: Playing Devil’s advocate, let me ask you if it’s a form of reverse-racism to suggest that black consumers should only buy from black businesses?

    AR: Just think, it's a business in which 99% of the customers are black, and 99% of the owners are Korean... That just seems a little off...don't you think?

    KW: Yep. What has been the response of blacks, whites and Koreans to your film?

    AR: White people say it's one-sided, Koreans don't like it either, but African-Americans give me hugs and tell me to ignore the white people.

    ...
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    For the rest of the interview click here

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    ...
    Below is an excerpt from the "BlacK Hair' documentary via YouTube.com.

    VIDEO CLICK HERE

    For MORE, go HERE.
    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Make sure you WATCH the VIDEO before you read the following below.

    Oh is this SO...

    That it TAKES A SEEDY WHITE to be CONCERN ABOUT THE PLIGHT OF BLACK WOMEN HAIR and the relationship of the BLACK COMMUNITY affair with IT.

    Wow, a SEEDY WHITE of GREATER SOCIETY who went out of his BUSY WAYS to SOLELY FOCUS ON BLACK WOMEN and their HAIR.

    So, there's JAPANESE, KOREAN, INDIAN, CHINESE, RUTHLESS WHITE'S GOLDEN DOME, SYNTHETIC, ANIMAL, etc in that HAIR.

    Just like the state of many BLACK COMMUNITIES especially URBAN ONES. IT'S HAS BECOME MUCH LIKE FOREIGN TERRITORY.

    I dont know if it MATTERS to ANYONE but I am willing to accept you as YOU ARE.

    FINISHED...
     
  6. FLATFOOTFLOOGIE

    FLATFOOTFLOOGIE Banned MEMBER

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    Dusty, I don't think sisters wanna touch this.LOL!
     
  7. dustyelbow

    dustyelbow Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Back, Found it!

    Like stars, regular black women going blond

    file:home3

    July 4, 2006

    BY MAUREEN JENKINS Staff Reporter


    Blond coifs belonging to Beyonce and Mary J. Blige may grab the headlines, but regular Chicago-area sisters who don't sing, act or dance are rocking golden locks this summer. You'll see them on women whose complexions range from deep dark chocolate to freckled peaches-and-cream.

    Thanks to high-tech products from lines designed specifically for African-American hair -- which tends to be fragile because of its texture and non-uniform cuticle layer -- it has gotten much easier for black women to play around with color. As those who've gone blond know, it takes work for naturally dark-haired girls to maintain that golden glow -- not to mention to keep that hair on their heads. But many believe the finished look is worth the fuss.

    "For women in general, it feels more [like] luxury, more high-profile," says Jacqueline Tarrant, director of education for Chicago-based SoftSheen-Carson, which produces color lines like Dark & Lovely, Hi Rez and Optimum Care. "Color brings light to your face and gives you a whole new sense of being. It's much less expensive than plastic surgery or a whole new wardrobe."

    Black blonds are hardly new, especially on concert stages. Sassy songstress Etta James and late Motown star Mary Wells sported golden locks back in the '60s. And the history stretches back to Africa, says Essence magazine beauty director and cover editor Mikki Taylor.
    At Panache Hair Design in Oak Park, salon owner Stephanie Pegues checks client LeVera Roman's golden locks. Pegues makes upkeep "agreements" with clients before taking them blond. (JIM FROST/ SUN-TIMES)
    GOLDEN RULES

    Considering lightening up for the summer?
    # Know thyself. "Blond is a bold statement," says SoftSheen-Carson's Jacqueline Tarrant (left), "and although it can look great on someone with your same [skin] tone, that doesn't necessarily mean it's something you can just do." It's not a look for wallflowers.


    # Get hair in shape first. Because you're removing color (and protein and moisture) from naturally dark hair, Tarrant and Oak Park stylist Stephanie Pegues insist it be in optimum condition before coloring. Consider making color the only chemical in your hair by going relaxer-free. But if you insist on both, says Tarrant, reduce your relaxer strength after coloring.


    # Take it slow.Not only will it look more natural, says Tarrant, but it's "better to lighten in steps rather than go from one to 1,000. You want to maintain the integrity of the hair strength because it doesn't do you any good if you [damage it] and have to cut it all off."


    # Commit to upkeep. Blond locks aren't cheap. At Pegues' upscale Panache Hair Design, virgin color with shampoo and styling is $145-$180, with highlights $135-$150. You'll have to invest in regular color touchups (they're $85 at Panache), satin pillowcases and conditioning shampoos for color-treated hair. "You really want to indulge your hair like you would any fine fabric," says Tarrant, "because your hair is a fiber."


    # Take it for a test drive first. Stop in a wig shop and see which blond undertones best match your complexion. Going blond is "a total commitment," says Tarrant, "which is why I say take it for a walk for the weekend."

    [email protected]

    "When I look back in African cultures and I look at the Dinkas [in southern Sudan] and how there was a coloring of hair with clay, that was the beginning of platinum blond," says Taylor, author of Self-Seduction: Your Ultimate Path to Inner and Outer Beauty (Ballantine, $29.95). "Not only were they going that ash platinum blond, there were also strong reds. I don't want to mistake black women going blond as a 'trend.' The use of hair color is a form of self-expression that has been with us since the earliest days."

    At different points in American history, black women who embraced typically Caucasian looks -- including colored contact lenses, long-and-loose straight locks and blond hair -- were accused of "wanting to be white." Not anymore, says Taylor.

    "We are so over that," she says. "We never thought blonds had more fun; we never thought anybody had more fun than we did!

    "It's been arrival time for black women for quite some time now. It is a celebratory period. And anytime there's a celebration going on, joy comes forth and expresses itself in many forms. You're seeing it from Hollywood, from the streets -- distinctive beauty moves you've never seen before."

    Tarrant says black celebs, including singers Christina Milian and Blu Cantrell and tennis star Serena Williams, have gone ga-ga for blond "because it gets you noticed. And when you're in entertainment, you want to stand out from the crowd. Nobody just wants to blend in."

    Adds Taylor, whose job keeps her in touch with black America's top celebrities and stylists: "It is the game of reinvention, if you will. It's the unexpected, the wow factor. Even those who are blond right now might be redheads next year." (That's why it's key for "real women" to remember that just because celebs can seemingly fly from light blond to dark brown and back within a week, they've got top-notch stylists hooking them up with realistic-looking wigs and weaves.)

    Because Essence celebrates sisters and self-expression, Taylor won't "typecast" which black women look better with fair hair. "There are chocolate women who look fabulous with golden blond or platinum hues or mocha-toned women who look good with cool blond. We leave that up to women to work in partnership with their stylists."

    Oak Park salon owner and Cosmetologists Chicago board member Stephanie Pegues finds that more clients want to go light in the spring and summer. And they range from twentysomethings to retirees, avant-garde types to the more conservative.

    To read the rest click here...
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    Oh is this so...

    Regular black woman who want to be blond.

    I see two sets of standards.

    The curseth skin tone issue and blond hair.


    Photo with quote below: http://images.suntimes.com/includes/NWS/images/blond0704_285.jpg
    • Know thyself. "Blond is a bold statement," says SoftSheen-Carson's Jacqueline Tarrant (left), "and although it can look great on someone with your same [skin] tone, that doesn't necessarily mean it's something you can just do." It's not a look for wallflowers.

    Only a certain skin tone looks GOOD in blonde.

    This CURSE is still with us.

    Even Essence Magazine Taylor is AVOIDING where BLOND looks good on a certain black women.


    Because Essence celebrates sisters and self-expression, Taylor won't "typecast" which black women look better with fair hair. "There are chocolate women who look fabulous with golden blond or platinum hues or mocha-toned women who look good with cool blond. We leave that up to women to work in partnership with their stylists."


    Reducing "black" women to pieces of CANDY is not my doing. And to REASSURE those CHOCOLATE women wont be offended when a certain skin tone say you do not LOOK GOOD because you are TOO DARK to be BLOND.

    Then we have same EDUCATED female with some out in the woods ideal that no REGULAR BLACK WOMEN in America look too saying...


    "When I look back in African cultures and I look at the Dinkas [in southern Sudan] and how there was a coloring of hair with clay, that was the beginning of platinum blond," says Taylor, author of Self-Seduction: Your Ultimate Path to Inner and Outer Beauty (Ballantine, $29.95). "Not only were they going that ash platinum blond, there were also strong reds. I don't want to mistake black women going blond as a 'trend.' The use of hair color is a form of self-expression that has been with us since the earliest days."

    At different points in American history, black women who embraced typically Caucasian looks -- including colored contact lenses, long-and-loose straight locks and blond hair -- were accused of "wanting to be white." Not anymore, says Taylor.

    "We are so over that," she says. "We never thought blonds had more fun; we never thought anybody had more fun than we did!

    "It's been arrival time for black women for quite some time now. It is a celebratory period. And anytime there's a celebration going on, joy comes forth and expresses itself in many forms. You're seeing it from Hollywood, from the streets -- distinctive beauty moves you've never seen before."
    I dont think any SISTER in AMERICA likes the idea of having CLAY in their HAIR. If the DINKA are the same TODAY as they were back THEN, they have a CONSTANT DIRECT LINK to their ANCESTORS and I GUESS THEIR SKIN TONE reflects THAT. In America many of us descendants of enslaved Africans have lost a great deal of our ancestors knowledge and ways.

    I guess there is CLAY and its certain AFRICAN DISTINCTION from Sudan which I see no one so FAR emulating then there is that OTHER choice which brings in the issue of that CURSETH SKIN TONE issue which correlates to being CONSIDERED as LOOKING GOOD or NOT.

    I REALLY HOPE THE ISSUE IS NOT IN REFERENCE TO RUTHLESS WHITE'S GOLDEN DOME.



    Oh well.



    FINISHED...
     
  8. FLATFOOTFLOOGIE

    FLATFOOTFLOOGIE Banned MEMBER

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    So they wear Blonde hair to be noticed, and that's all. Uh, huh, just hit my head hard comin' off that turnip truck like I did.
     
  9. dustyelbow

    dustyelbow Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Well SISTERS are being JUDGED so their JUSTIFICATION for IT is all the TOUCHING REQUIRED.

    I really hope this issue is squared away in an OPEN CONTEXT for the COMMUNITY by US and not by SOMEBODY ELSE who just CAME ALONG.
     
  10. backtoafrica

    backtoafrica Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Black women can never be beautiful unless they look Caucasian/Asian.
     
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