Black Christians : Slavery in the New England States, part 3

Discussion in 'Christian Study Group' started by Chevron Dove, May 10, 2011.

  1. Chevron Dove

    Chevron Dove Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    North to Freedom!? Slavery in the New England States of Colonial America~
    part 3


    After I had searched and found an image of the slave woman on a community patchwork quilt, I wondered about her life but also, I wondered about the actual artist that painted her as well and the kind of life he had lived. I wondered why the artist chose to paint her image and what kind of thoughts went through his mind. I wondered just how did he view this Black African woman of whom he knew since his youth. How did he feel about Black people in general especially during his lifetime as he lived during the time when the north campaigned against the south on the basis of chattel slavery. The slave woman Nancy actually lived up into that very period and when the underground railroad movement occurred right there in Connecticut. In fact, the very status of Nancy as a chattel slave in the north caused me to wonder about the presence of other possible Black people that could have been enslaved in the north. Why did the government allow this little slave girl to be enslaved in the north? America has taught us that chattel slavery was in the south, and the north fought against the south to end slavery. However, it never occurred to me until now, that based on the story of Nancy Tony, we have been completely deceived. I was led to believe that during the early colonial times and prior, the north was a place where there were no Black African people. We were taught that Black Africans were brought over to America on slave ships from Africa and forced into chattel slavery in the south. The only dark presence that I saw from my school books were mostly of white Indians of whom had straight dark hair and indeed, this is what they show in all of their movies today as well. Shockingly though, after searching more deeper, I actually stumbled across some incredible records that reveal there was indeed a serious concentration of Black African-typed people in New England in early colonial times and these records show that many of them were slaves! Not only that but, they are on record for being apart of the American Revolution, the same time period that the slave girl Nancy was born! Furthermore, slavery existed in New England up until the rising movement of the underground railroad!

    So it seems that the north was living under a double standard. While they organized to fight against the south, they actually allowed slavery to exist in their country almost the whole time just until that point when they decided to separate from the south in order to use that issue of chattel slavery against them. And the story of Nancy and more reveals this truth! So I wonder how did the artist view this African slave woman of whom he decided to paint. After I dwelled on these thoughts for awhile, I soon became more and more curious about what the actual oil painting of her looked like and wondered why it was that it was not made available. This slave Nancy Toney has a complete storyline from her birth until her death and because her image was captured, her presence obviously made some kind of an impact on the artist. For him to be moved in his spirit to paint her, the image of her might reveal something about both the slave and the artist that could help to understand this kind of history with regards to justified human sacrifice. Did the artist capture her image to treasure as a memorial or was it out of remorse for a life that was used and then thrown away without being able to give retribution for such an heinous act. I believe all of the information collected about her life might help us to see the bigger picture and understand the mindset of our enslavers and also get a better grasp of how we too have formed and how we regard ourselves and each other today based upon these governmental foundations. We might better understand what they saw in us as Black Africans and how their attitudes impact us today. How did the artist feel as he sat down and looked into her eyes and captured her image? What were his emotions as he focused on this slave Nancy that was subjected to his every whim?

    1774~Before & After the Birth of Nancy Toney ​


    The mother of Nancy Toney is not mentioned in available records but it has been written that her mother was a slave, as well, for a wealthy man named Hezekiah Bradley in an area called Greenfield Hill and in Fairfield county Connecticut. This slave woman gave birth to Nancy in either 1774 or 1775 during the time that led up to the American Revolution and a time in which much conflicts did occur in that area in regards to war. It was written that because the law stated that if a child was born in slavery that was their fate, to remain a slave until death. Hezekiah Bradley had a daughter in 1764 named Charlotte Bradley that later married a doctor named Hezekiah Chaffee Jr., in 1784 (or 1785) when she was about twenty years old. When the little slave girl Nancy was four (4) years old though, she was given to Charlotte (at the age fourteen) to be her slave and later when Charlotte had gotten married, Nancy was taken away from her mother at the age of ten (10) and given to Charlotte as a wedding gift. Nancy was taken to another part of Connecticut called Windsor to be a slave for Dr. Hezekiah Chaffee, Jr. and Charlotte (Bradley) Chaffee and would remain as a slave for them for the next 36 years of her life and until both Hezekiah and Charlotte had died.

    [​IMG]

    Above is the actual picture of the house that the little slave girl Nancy was taken to when Charlotte Bradley Chaffee left her home in Fairfield to live in Windsor, Connecticut in an area called Palisado Green and the house still remains today. Hezekiah Chaffee, Jr., was born in 1762 and in 1765, when he was three years old, his father also named Hezekiah Chaffee had this house built for his son. The father, Hezekiah Chaffee originally moved from Rehoboth, Maryland to Connecticut and was a doctor during the American Revolution. His son, Hezekiah Jr. also grew up to become a doctor as well. It was also mentioned that in 1774, Hezekiah senior entertained the future president of America, John Adams, in that house in Palisado Green and the visit was significant and perhaps the reason why, when the son Hezekiah Chaffee Jr. grew up and married Charlotte Bradley in 1785, their child may have been named after the wife of John Adams. The house was to become a noted memorial and Hezekiah senior lived nearby in another house in Palisado green as well.

    1785 -to- 1821~ For 36 Years~

    In 1785, the little slave girl Nancy was about ten (10) years old. After Dr. Hezekiah Chaffee Jr. married Charlotte (Bradley) Chaffee, Nancy Toney was their slave for the next 36 years of her life. In 1787, three years later after they married, Charlotte Bradley gave birth to their daughter of which they named Abigail Chaffee when the little slave girl was now 13 years old. Two years later in 1789 they had their son named, Hezekiah Bradley Chaffee, and another two years in 1791, they had another son named, Samuel Griswold Chaffee. So, 1784 or 1785 + 36 = 1821, Nancy was apart of that house for 36 years and was now 46 years old. And it was after many years in 1821 when the slave Nancy Toney was forty-six (46) years old that she would now be given to Hezekiah and Charlotte’s daughter, Abigail to become her slave. That means that like her mother Charlotte, Abigail Chaffee was trained to be a slave mistress from her birth and the slave girl, Nancy, was her
    subject while she was educated on the ways of slavery, the lot of Negroes under American law, and the privileged White Supremacist world that she was born to live with in. In 1821 and after Dr. Hezekiah Chaffee, Jr. died that year at the age of 59 years old, the slave girl now, a slave woman, was sent away from Palisado Green to be a slave under another family. From her birth in about 1775 and for 46 years of her life, she had been a slave and at that time she became known as ‘Old Nance’. She was owned by and passed from Hezekiah Bradley to Hezekiah Chaffee and now was being sent to be under another family. In 1818, Dr. Hezekiah Chaffee made a will before he died in 1821 and in it, he bequeathed to his daughter Abigail, “my Negro slave Nancy”. Now based on several other accounts there are a lot more facts that can be added during the 36 years of Nancy’s life in Windsor, Connecticut on Palisado Ave. before she left there.

    By the year 1821, when Abigail Chaffee took the slave woman Nancy into her house, she was 34 years old and she already had five young children. Abigail had gotten married, left her father’s house on Palisado Ave. at the age of 18 in the year 1805 and, she married a man named Colonel James Loomis. According to records, Abigail had a child that year in November named after herself as Abigail Sherwood Loomis but the baby died a month later in December. She had another child in 1807, another child in 1809, another child in 1811, another child in 1813, and then another one in 1815. So by the time that the slave woman Nancy was 30 years old, Abigail had gotten married and left her father’s house and, by the time that Nancy was 46 years old, the white woman had a total of five children, 4 sons and a daughter ranging from the ages of 8 to 14 and was awarded from her father his “Negro slave Nancy”. Nancy was a slave for 46 years of her life and saw the birth and life of one family into adulthood and now, it was as if she had to start all over again, but as an old woman. What kind of a life was that! This slave woman Nancy went from being under Hezekiah Bradley, to Dr. Hezekiah Chaffee, Jr. and now onto being under Col. James Loomis’ household as a slave to them and his wife. Was she the only slave in the house? Amazingly, records show that long before Abigail left her father’s house at the age of 18, there was another slave girl at Palisado Green under Dr. Hezekiah Chaffee, Jr. named Elizabeth Stevenson, and in the year of 1810, that slave girl was emancipated! So that would mean that even before Abigail had gotten married and left her father’s house, there was another slave in the house at Palisado Green along with the slave Nancy. And just five (5) years after Abigail got married and left in 1805, this slave girl Elizabeth was freed and left in 1810. The emancipation records show two ages and that the slave girl Elizabeth was supposed to remain a slave until she was twenty-five years old, but then because of her healthy status and her application, she was freed at the age of nineteen (19) years old in 1810. So, if the emancipation records state that Elizabeth Stevenson was nineteen (19) years old when she was granted emancipation in 1810 then, that would mean that she was born in 1791 when the slave Nancy was sixteen (16) years old! Interestingly too, that would also be the same year that her mistress Charlotte gave birth to her third child named Samuel. Therefore, that would mean that this slave girl Elizabeth could have possibly been the daughter of Hezekiah Chaffee and his “Negro slave” girl Nancy! Or perhaps the father Hezekiah Chaffee senior of whom was still living at that time could also have been the father, but he was not apart of that household. At any rate, the mistress Abigail was only three years older than the slave girl Elizabeth Stevenson. Five years after Abigail left, Elizabeth Stevenson becomes emancipated in 1810 and the slave woman Nancy was left behind at 35 years old.

    According to other records, in 1784 when the slave Nancy was about Nine (9) years old and right before she was given to the first mistress Charlotte as a wedding gift, there were said to be ‘gradual laws’ that allowed for some slaves to gain freedom although this depended upon the choice and discretion of the slave holders. And obviously in regards to Nancy, even if the law was actually written down, it was disregarded at will and had no bearing on the humans that were indeed sacrificed under the Whites that chose to continue holding slaves for their own personal use. Nancy was given as a gift to Charlotte (Bradley) Chaffee and obviously, Charlotte ignored that law as if it were never written and made use of that little Black girl to enhance her life. Six years later, another little slave girl was born in 1791, the aforementioned, Elizabeth, and was added to the work force of that house and then 19 years later in 1810, Elizabeth was set free. Two years later in 1812, Charlotte died at the age of 48 [b.1764, d. 1812], and Dr. Hezekiah remarried that next year in 1813 to a young woman named Abigail Talcott. Around this time period too, America faced some great conflicts.

    Since the time even before the Boston Tea Party in 1773 and the Revolutionary War that begun in 1775 and when the slave Nancy was born, many Native Americans of whom identified themselves as being ‘Redskins’ had become hostile. In 1754 a great conflict known as the Seven Years’ War involved many hostile Indians in Middle America of whom bonded with France against the British because they attempted to get help from the French and hoped to fight back against the British and remain in the lands that they were continually becoming pushed off from. However, they were unfortunately faced with an unexpected doom in that the French basically abandoned them and made peace with the British in 1763 and therefore, left the Indians vulnerable for revenge attacks. And even though this war came to a halt, it led to more problems of which continued onward into the time of the American Revolution and beyond and hindsight shows that Native people were totally being exploited at their unawares, a reality that also had a heavy bearing upon the lives of millions and millions of Black African people all over the world including the continent of Africa.

    What the Natives may not have been aware of was that the face of France was in the process of changing! For almost a thousand years and since even around the time of the Crusades, France was considered to be a country that had a significant Black African-typed presence but, by and by they were being removed. About a decade after the American Revolution began, France went through a revolution too that was sparked in 1789 when after Austrian born, Marie Antoinette, who had earlier become the queen of France, was cited for her immoral behavior and lavish lifestyle in the midst of the suffering masses. Unfortunately for the masses hindsight shows that this occasion was used to set up another system that was not in the favor of the original people. Likewise, the Native Americans were unaware of the changes occurring and, that the White Austrian presence in France were actually a kind of people that were directly related to the British and many of the White Americans! White Anglo-Saxon typed people of whom operated from France as well as from the seat of authority in other European countries competed against each other for trade control over colonies all over the world including Africa for the slave trade as well. After the French made peace with the British in 1763, the British turned their attention to dominating trade over their American colonies and the Americans decided that they wanted to have the freedom to get rich and not be made poor by the British imposing taxes on them for products that they felt they could afford to do without for a time. And in 1810, an Indian named Tecumseh was on the scene. The Indians in Middle America at a time that it was known as the Northwest Frontier, sought help from the British and fought in the last great Revolutionary War against the Americans and that war became known as the War of 1812. This was the time when the Chaffee household changed due to the slave girl Elizabeth of whom left in 1810, the death of Charlotte Chaffee in 1812 and the remarriage of Hezekiah Chaffee in 1813. Amazingly, research caused me to stumble across a picture of the slave girl Elizabeth along with a record of her emancipation!

    [​IMG]

    Now on this very document, the life of the slave woman Nancy Toney was included which further offers a clue that she was indeed the very mother of the slave girl Elizabeth. And even though the ages of Nancy and Elizabeth offers the obvious clue to this possibility of blood relations, after being able to look at an enlarged image in comparison to the many portraits of their White enslavers, the emancipated slave girl Elizabeth seems to have the same wide, thin mouth and pronounced forehead that many of them had as well. At any rate, after Elizabeth was set free in 1810, the slave woman Nancy continued on in this household as a slave. And one of the most interesting issues that surrounds the life of Black African people around these very times that were enslaved and oppressed was that Daniel-the-prophet wrote about these end times. According to his vision in DANIEL 8:1, 13-14, he was told that in the very year of 1815, the world government would finally separate from exploiting the Church [temple] of God…of which they did.

    Again, from a time even before the American Revolution in 1775 and before the Boston Tea Party in 1773, the Anglo-Saxon, Austrian, and German people in European systems entered into France and changed the face of France and hindsight reveals the outcome. The dark presence in France soon became overthrown systematically and the Natives in America and other parts of the world were deceived and divided continually until they were subdued. Finally in 1815,the Americans made peace with the British and the greatest losers were the natives and the millions of Africans in slavery and in the huge continent of Africa for, the slave ship trade continued onward. In that same year, the Battle of Waterloo had ended and the French had changed their flag to symbolize they had ended their French Revolution and went from a royal government to a national system.

    The title of ‘king’ of which symbolizes ‘a system that is headed up by inherited rights’ was changed to symbolize that like all White Supreme governments that were able to sit up in ancient Black lands, the system became headed up by a manmade law in which the head could be elected or selected. For thousands and thousands of years ancient Black kings and queens would bond with pagan people and continually give up their inheritance and allow their own kind to suffer. Therefore as Daniel wrote, for a time, God stopped delivering ancient Black African people and he stopped allowing them to exploit the temple and then turn around and blame their actions solely on the opportunist. Sin must be manifested because some people don’t want to believe that a spirit can be evil enough to hurt innocence and therefore they continue to support it and choose to ignore it. And when this kind of evil is supported, innocence continues to become hurt and perpetrators will hide behind that support continually. They were using the Church, the ancient temple systems, the kings and even the priesthood of whom allowed persecutions to occur in the name of God, and the ancient prophets were being attacked and killed off by their own people for speaking against it! Therefore, the Creator God stopped delivering ancient Black kings and queens after they had been overthrown. Again, according to the Bible, God’s permissive will has allowed these kinds of offenses to manifest under White Supremacy because ancient Black African people continued to give their souls over to it and they supported these systems and allowed their own kind to be hurt…continually. God’s permissive will has allowed white Supremacy to prove their arrogance and hide behind Black African support to prove mankind…but only for a time. Cont.

    But whoso shall offend one of these little ones which believe in me, it were better for him that a millstone were hanged about his neck, and that he were drowned in the depth of the sea.

    Woe unto the world because of offences! for it must needs be that offences come; but woe to that man by whom the offence cometh! ST MATTHEW 18: 6-7.
    ______________________________________________

    In the third year of the reign of king Belshazzar a vision appeared unto me, even unto me Daniel, after that which appeared unto me at the first…

    Then I heard one saint speaking, and another saint said unto that certain saint which spake, How long shall be the vision concerning the daily sacrifice, and the transgression of desolation, to give both the sanctuary and the host to be trodden under foot?

    And he said unto me, Unto two thousand and three hundred days; then shall the sanctuary be cleansed. DANIEL 8:1, 13-14.
    *All 12 Chapters of DANIEL revolves around these end times; this prophecy is ‘a day for a year prophecy’; 2300 years - 485 BC = AD 1815; the Separation of Church & State…completed.​
     
  2. Chevron Dove

    Chevron Dove Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Slavery in the New England States, part 4

    Slavery in the New England States, part 4 --

    North to Freedom!? Slavery in the New England States of Colonial America~


    The slave woman Nancy was 37 years old when Charlotte Chaffee died in 1812 and she would remain under Hezekiah Chaffee for the next nine (9) years before she was sent to be under yet another house at the age of 46 years old. Hezekiah Chaffee, Jr. was written to have had a total of five children in some records but only three from Charlotte. Dr. Hezekiah Senior died when he was 88 years old in 1819 [b.1731, d. 1819], and then in 1821, Dr. Hezekiah Chaffee, Jr. died too when he had turned to be about 60 [b.1762, d.1821], and Nancy Toney was sent off to become the property of Abigail Chaffee Loomis and she would remain under this household for the rest of her life of which she was made to live for another thirty-six (36) more years and died in the year 1857 at the age of 82 years old.


    1821~ Until Death Do We Part~ in 1857



    [​IMG]

    It is not made clear whether Old Nance, at the age of forty-six (46) was brought to live in the above Loomis homestead in Windsor ever or not but some references say that the Loomis homestead goes back to the early 1600s when the first Loomis’ came to New England. That particular house was put on postcards in 1914 but was built in 1825 long after Abigail Loomis had left the house at Palisado Green. In fact, it was built just three years after Old Nance was brought to be under their family roof in 1821. Another house, a colonial brick house, on Broad Street in Windsor was also the home of Col. James Loomis and his family and remains today as well. So perhaps back in 1805 when Abigail had just gotten married and began to have children, she went to live in the brick house on Broad street. After she lost the first infant girl in 1805, two years later in 1807 she gave birth to her son named James Chaffee Loomis. In 1809 she had Hezekiah Bradley Loomis and in 1811, she then gave birth to Samuel Odiah Loomis. In 1813 she had Osbert Burr Loomis and in 1815, she gave birth to Abigail Sarah Loomis. So by 1821 when her father awarded her the slave Old Nance, her children were ages 8 to 14. It was later said that at some point that the Loomis records show that they gave Nancy freedom at some point after they had gotten her as property from the will of Hezekiah Chaffee or between 1821 and 1830, but to date, there are no freedom papers found. Perhaps then, it was in their own mindset that they believe this woman to be free to do what she wanted to do with her life--after not being able to do it in the past 46 years!? For this scenario would be that Abigail (Chaffee) Loomis, who had five young children and who now was sent her father’s slave woman of whom had no other skills accept to be a house slave, suddenly sets her free--yet all the while she houses this Negro woman for the next 36 years--and perhaps in her mind she views this woman as being free!?--To do what!? The slave woman Nancy was well skilled for 46 years and was a complete house slave and that was all that she knew since the time of her birth!

    Nevertheless Nancy Toney remained under James and Abigail Loomis until she died and obviously, she was of no use anyway, without help from someone who knew how to help a slave like her adjust to a totally new way of life as a free person. Where would she have gone?--to the north or perhaps the south? Harriet Tubman was on the move…to the north. Just like in the north, there were free Black people living in the south as well. Yes, they were free but, to what extent? What exactly does freedom detail in regards to us under this American law? Like Harriet too, Nancy was enslaved as chattel from birth, but what did a northern slave do when they sought to be freed from their hell? What happened to Elizabeth Stevenson? The state of Connecticut finally wrote into their laws and abolished chattel slavery in 1848!--Just two years before the Fugitive Slave Law went into affect. So this shocking reality means that perhaps the New England states only abolished slavery on their books and regrouped in order to fight against the south due to a competition over land control that was being sought by the south towards the western frontier and beyond. The southerners fought back against the northerners of whom cut them out of the trade deal because of industrialization and the manufacturing trade deals they were getting up north from other parts of the world instead of the south. The north did not need southern slave picked cotton anymore and the south was about to be shut down, so they went west and aimed to shove the Natives aside, and all of a sudden, the New Englanders suddenly saw the light!?--That slavery was wrong. And they did not agree with the government in their new found quest to push to California in their Manifest Destiny declaration of which gave the government the manmade right to completely ignore their previous treaties (laws) in regards to the Indian Territories. So what happened then, to their slaves or ex-slaves in New England? What happened to the ones of whom were enslaved as early as the American Revolution period?

    It has been written that some of these exploited Black slaves were able to flee during these very times and find refuge in certain places in Canada and with the help of some British troops of whom were fighting against the Americans. On both sides of the war though, this was what they dangled out towards the Black men at that time of whom some of them were indeed enslaved in places like New England and in Canada! But what about the Black slave girls!? Both the British and the Americans promised freedom for the Black men of whom were able to flee from their captivity and find their way into either of the military camps! We have been so deceived about early American history in the north! And did these enslaved Blacks only come from the slave ships from Africa that docked in the New England ports? It would be ridiculous to believe that there was never any Black Natives in that region. Once the New England states began to write into their laws against chattel slavery, did they also blot out their history that details the presence of Black Natives and the Black slaves they had on their books? Did they cover up Black Native inherited rights to these lands by writing them down as being ‘soldiers’, ’slaves’ or ‘citizens’ to hide the truth? Did these northern ex-slaves remain as did Nancy Toney, or did they all leave and go into another trap?

    Did Nancy ever get to see the young freed slave girl, Elizabeth Stevenson ever again!? If I were in the shoes of Elizabeth, sadly so, as much as I would have wanted to see my own mother, I would have left the land of my enslavement completely and put miles between that land and me, and only seek to re-enter to free my mother but never to visit. I would have done as Harriet did. At any rate, after Nancy went to be under the Loomis’ family, Abigail had yet another child in 1825 named James Mason Loomis, just shortly after the slave woman Nancy became her slave in 1821, and when her youngest daughter was ten (10) years old. In the year 1825 too, it was the same year that the house on their homestead property was built. And so these six (6) young children, five sons and one daughter, lived most of their lives around this slave woman Nancy. How did they view her all of their lives? Did they believe that she was a free woman, --or an entrapped spirit of who knew to do nothing else but serve their desires? Nancy lived under their home for the rest of her life and died at the age of 82 years old in 1857, a time that was well into the Underground Railroad movement in which there were many stations (homes) set up right there in Connecticut. Old Nance died only a couple of years before the death of Col. James Loomis of whom lived to be 83 years old in 1862 [b. 1799, d. 1862], and this was the very year one of his sons returned back home at the age of 49 and it was actually at that time that he decided to sit down and preserve the image of the slave woman Nancy. Yes, the man, Osbert Burr Loomis, painted what he had remembered of the image of Nancy Toney after she had already been dead five years before.

    Osbert Loomis was the fourth son born to Abigail in 1813 and he was eight (8) years old when Old Nance came to be apart of his household permanently in 1821 and until her death. Osbert grew up and left Windsor, Connecticut and had lived in Chicago for awhile. He began to go back to Connecticut when his parents began to become ill and then in 1862 when his father died, it was said that he began to reminisce about his childhood life and decided to put some of his fondest memories to his canvas and painted some amazing portraits of certain landscapes in Windsor. It was also this very time that he sat down to capture the image of Nancy Toney. Amazingly, she did not pose for him to paint her image but for some reason he decided to paint her image as she was firmly imprinted on his mind as he knew her for so many years. What inspired him to do this at that time after she had already been dead? It was suggested that he painted her as a request from someone else in the family because he never signed the portrait and it was kept within the family for years. Years later it was apart of the property of his sister, Abigail Sarah Loomis-Hayden and after it was taken from there it was later framed and put in a museum in Chicago. So perhaps the request came from his mother Abigail though, of whom was still alive in 1862 when her husband had died. Her brother, Hezekiah (Chaffee Bradely) also died when he was 84 years old in 1864, two years later after her husband died. The slave Nancy Toney was already apart of her life at the time of her birth and so she had known this slave woman from as far back as she could remember. And so five years later after her husband died, she died at the age of 80 years old in 1867 [b. 1787, d. 1867]. She died ten years after the death of the slave woman Nancy Toney and two years after the Emancipation Proclamation had been signed and made law! Amazing. And equally amazing was this reality; It was just three (3) years after Abigail Sherwood (Chaffee) Loomis had died that strangely, all of her grandchildren were also dead, and all had died before the ages of 21 years old.

    Out of all of the seven children that Abigail Loomis had given birth to and out of all of the grandchildren that came from them, they had all died by the year of 1870 and that whole family line was cut off. This was the year that the portrait of Nancy Toney was dedicated to a museum. So my feelings are as such; What was the worth and purpose of forcing a little girl to give up her whole soul in America in order to only exist to just slave over others just because they were White and she was Black African other than to just serve their earthly arrogance? How did her miserable life in America as a chattel slave help me today as a Black African American woman? Today, because I am a Black African American this very law does not give me the same protection that White America gets so, will this government ever be judged for their actions? I was told that even though my babies were stolen from me and after going in severe debt and putting my life on the line to go back into their courts to prove this injustice, I was eventually given my babies back, but I was also told that there was nothing that I could do to get financial restitution for what their law provided them to do to me and my family, and therefore, I exist today as a Second Class Citizen to say the least. In debt. I am unqualified to receive many services and benefits afforded to other citizens as a result of the debt I incurred in order to fight for the life of my own children against the very actions of this government. Furthermore and after trying to work to provide and support my family, I was one day told that after being permanently injured on my job that it is a federal law that I was supposed to be given medical treatment when I reported it to the job with in the legal required time limit, yet I was not. Instead this law protected the job of whom suppressed this act of denying me medical treatment, harassed me further and caused me further permanent injury and etc. Within only a few months after I reported my injury, suddenly after years of having all excellent job reviews and training others, I was cited for not being able to do my job properly and I was terminated. I am told by the court that there is nothing that I can do about it legally because I do not have the kind of money to seek justice from the court system in America. So, I call this system the perverted justice of Canaan and for this reason and I have no choice but to put all of my hope, faith, and trust in the Creator God of this world.

    I realize that this system has in fact done right by other African Americans and understand why it would be to their benefit to support such a system. Unfortunately too, White racism will forever use these select kinds of people to justify their actions, and thereby block all chances for the masses of other Black Africans to have our human rights protected, so it still comes down to a matter of free choice. History does show too, that when many others have tried to confront human rights violations, they become severely persecuted, and is my very predicament as well. Nevertheless, it still is about this system whether we support it or not, that becomes the determinant for the Creator in how divisions will be made. It is this same system today, the very same system that allowed so many others like Nancy Toney to exist her whole life as a slave or in debt to others and then die with no adequate retribution for her life as being able to become trained and then use that skill to set up her own life free from those who put her in debt to them. She lived her whole life in debt towards the people who suppressed her and exploited her. They took her mind and never allowed her to be free and connect to the God that created her to be a woman who should serve him in support of her own race, culture and people. Wow.

    This has caused me to understand why Jesus said statements like [paraphrasing], ‘they have their reward’, ‘if they sue you for your coat, give them your cloak too’… They seek a reward from a government set up by mankind of which will be cut off by God thereby, it becomes the extent of limited rewards. I have come to understand why Jesus said for us who believe in him to have patience and exercise the fruits of the spirit of the Holy Comforter [Holy Ghost] because for many of us, freedom is yet to come, but these kinds of sins must be manifested under the government in order to judge it completely. Therefore it comes down to a matter of choice, and I have chosen not to support a system that has Separated from Christ and a system who can provide this kind of human sacrifice--continually since their conception. Anyway, these thoughts run through my mind after reading this story about the slave life of Nancy Toney.

    Because the life of the slave, Nancy Toney, offers a story line that can be followed from the beginning to the end, it becomes so beneficial in seeing how our American government works so unjustly. The children of James and Abigail Loomis though, realized that after all of their children had died, they wanted to give something back to others in some way. So they came together and decided to pool their funds and property and other assets together and organize a school in hopes to share their wealth with others and give others an opportunity to make a living and enjoy a comfortable life as they were able to do. Most of them lived for years after the death of their parents and died in other places in America. The oldest son, James Chaffee Loomis died when he was 70 years old in 1877 [b.1807, d. 1877], ten years after his mother Abigail had died. He became a state senator. Hezekiah Bradley Loomis died that next year after his brother in 1878 when he was 69 years old [b.1809, d. 1878] and it was perhaps he who had served in the military. Samuel Odiah Loomis died in 1844 when he was 44 years old [b.1811, d. 1855], before the slave Nancy died and before both of his parents had died. Osbert Burr Loomis, the artist, died in 1886 when he was 73 years old in New York [b.1813, d. 1886]. Abigail Sarah Loomis-Hayden died in 1898 when she was 83 years old [b.1815, d.1898] and she was married to a judge. John Mason Loomis died in 1900 when he was 75 years old [b.1825, d. 1900] and was the last mentioned direct descendant of James and Abigail Loomis. In other references there are records and many portraits of other Loomis descendants outside of this particular family including portraits of Abigail’s brothers of the Chaffee lineage, other Chaffee descendants, and there are references that show the Bradley lineages as well.

    The very house of Dr. Hezekiah Chaffee Loomis where Nancy Toney was enslaved for years became designated to be used as a school and has been opened since 1914. It has recently been said that a foreign student who once studied there from abroad actually designed the inaugural dress for first lady Michelle Obama but, would this justify sacrificing the soul of Nancy Toney and so many other little Black African girls like her? This story of Nancy Toney too, encompasses the very sin of Eve, of which has put so many little Black African girls into such a vulnerable lot to be exploited by White Supremacy, and a lot that Jehovah has been striving to free us from since the conception of this sin. But at times over the course of thousands of years, and for some strange reason, certain ancient Black African [Hamitic-typed] woman who have had that door of freedom opened up to them, have turned right back around and have chosen to sit back down under their captivity and support White Supremacy. Therefore, the Bible shows us that there must come a time when divisions must be made regardless. When the mind has been destroyed in the process, then it defines the complete ill fruit of Human Sacrifice and this is why God has to judge the system. Human sacrifice is a great evil and it must be judged. There is a difference between bond servitude and slavery of which our God proved many times in the Bible. There is a difference between engaging in a sexual relationship with an adult as opposed to forcing a sexual act upon a little child repeatedly for years and then allowing them to remain under this kind of demon until they die for what ever reason. There is a difference between forcing a sexual relationship upon an adult person due to a motive of passion, love, and admiration as opposed to forcing a sex act upon a person or forcing a person to perform a sex act against their will due to a motive of hate, supremacy, and revenge, and the latter is called rape.

    Where there is love there is charity and giving of oneself but, where there is envy there is a devouring spirit who only takes for oneself. Where there is love there will be a sense of responsibility even if it means an act of apologizing, confession and restoration (or restitution) but, where there is envy there will always be a sense of justified evil, self-centeredness, arrogance and pride. And all of these acts will hopefully be judged accordingly, measure for measure and, by and by one day. But for some strange reason, America believes that all they have to do is apologize for having chattel slavery without ever having provide any adequate restitution and all will be forgiven and forgotten by our God. But out of the many available stories and images of past humans, Black African Americans, that laid the foundation for today, they are only but a few in reality, compared to the numbers given in regards to the many souls taken out of Africa and put on those slave ships. The evidence is still here, yet it still helps to read about the few stories that are provided. Surprisingly though, and although I am unable to paste it here, after searching relentlessly I found an image of the real oil painting that Osbert Burr Loomis had painted. I was finally able to look upon the very image that Osbert saw in his mind of a Black African slave woman that had already died five years before he put her on his canvas and for me, the feeling was surreal. And yes!--On the patchwork quilt the real image of the slave woman Nancy cannot be seen, but in the oil painting, the image of Nancy Toney seems to reveal that very same trait of a wide, thin mouth and a strong chin, the kind of traits that several of her White enslavers show in their portraits! Was she the product of rape too? What about her mother, what happened to her life and how did it end?

    The image is astonishing. The title of it has been named, ‘Daily Chores: Interior scene with woman’ when it became apart of a museum in 1870 and in other fine arts exhibitions. The artist, Osbert seems to have painstakingly painted her, with detail in regards to her clothes down to her very shoes. He puts detail into even how she sits, rest her feet, holds her arms and looks up. He paints Old Nance in her surroundings as she sat there in the kitchen of her enslavement besides a spinning wheel with amazing detail. It’s as if she is looking straight back at the painter while she spins the yarn. The chore that she labors with simply looks like it has become apart of her. She makes it seem as those she doesn‘t even have to concentrate on what seems to be a monotonous task. She has become apart of her endless task. Right there in that chair, that has become her refuge. That seems to be her reward that keeps her going and living until her end finally came one day. I wonder did she have any thoughts beyond that chair, that house and that community. Did she ever dwell upon Elizabeth, the other little slave girl that was there with her one day and then gone the next, or did she try to erase an impossible dream of ever seeing her again? Did she ever believe that there could be anything better and beyond those White people than what they offered her since she was born? She was trapped and had to resign to this reality. They took her life from her and made it what they wanted it to be like. At any rate, that was the summation of her life, that was perhaps the White people’s eventual perceived freedom of Nancy, who lived their lives around her in that house, going to and from many places in their world and then coming back every now and then to see her there, doing the chores that she had become depended upon to make herself feel worthy, --to them and to herself. That was the approval that she sought. Profound.

    Portrait, oil painting of Nancy Toney~
    click on link, then scroll down to page 12, magnify to +200 or more!
    http://www.ct.gov/cct/lib/cct/FreedomTrail_Brochure_final.pdf


    Blessed are the meek: for they shall inherit the earth.
    Blessed are they which do hunger and thirst after righteousness:
    for they shall be filled.
    Blessed are the merciful: for they shall obtain mercy.
    Blessed are the pure in heart: for they shall see God.
    ST. MATTHEW 5:5-8.​

    History of five Loomis’ Children of James & Abigail Loomis who dedicated funds to build a school after all of their children had died before they did--
    http://www.loomischaffee.org/page.cfm?p=349

    Other paintings by Osbert Burr Loomis; 1866 of a coffee plantation in Cuba, perhaps a portrait of himself~
    http://www.askart.com/AskART/assets...3383_HaciendainaTropicalMountainLandscape.jpg
    http://www.askart.com/AskART/artists/search/ArtistKeywords.aspx?searchtype=KEYWORDS&artist=12673
    http://www.askart.com/AskART/artist.aspx?artist=12673&redir
    http://www.askart.com/AskART/artists/search/Search_Repeat.aspx?searchtype=IMAGES&artist=12673

    Family photos of some of the Loomis’, Hezekiah Bradley Chaffee, Abigail Sarah, Osbert & John Mason~
    http://photos.geni.com/p11/62/f9/59/c9/534448384ea629c0/IMG_medium.jpg
    http://photos.geni.com/p11/10/15/ec/a2/534448384ee6f381/Abigail_Loomis_medium.jpg
    http://photos.geni.com/p11/19/da/68/b4/534448384eace842/IMG_0005_medium.jpg
    http://photos.geni.com/p11/88/85/d3/26/534448384eacb18c/IMG_0004_medium.jpg

    Portraits of chaffee loomis
    http://books.google.com/books?id=1X...v=onepage&q=charlotte bradley chaffee&f=false
     
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