Pan Africanism : slavery in Niger

Discussion in 'Black History - Culture - Panafricanism' started by indya, Jul 20, 2005.

  1. indya

    indya Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    I came across this article about slavery in Niger when I was reading about the drought that is going on in that area. This is revolting to read, they are going through the same things today that our ancesters lived through and no one seems to know anything about it and apparently the leaders of the country are pushing it under the rug.


    A Nigerian study has found that almost 8% of the population are slaves

    When we spoke to her masters they denied owning slaves. The practice of slavery was outlawed in Niger last year.

    Trading in slaves has been banned in Niger since the days of the French colonists in the last century, but ownership of slaves was never specifically banned

    Slave children are taken away from their parents before they are two-years-old, to break the bonds between parent and child and to eliminate any sense of identity.

    The children grow up working in the house of the master.

    Assibit was born into slavery, as was her mother and her husband

    The slave owners encourage the slaves to reproduce to increase their numbers, sometimes even determining when they have sexual intercourse.

    They treat the slaves like their cattle.
    Slaves are often beaten for small misdemeanours.
    They work long hours and are sometimes deprived of food as punishment.
     
  2. Sekhemu

    Sekhemu Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    This is outrageous.

    Does the article identify the slave masters?
     
  3. Isaiah

    Isaiah Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    We just don't care... We simply do not care...

    We are totally shameless, and that is why THIS garbage continues...

    Peace!
    Isaiah
     
  4. indya

    indya Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    I realized I didn't provide a link to this, sorry. Although this article doesn't identify who own the slaves it does say the government ignors the problem to a certain degree.

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/africa/3972669.stm
     
  5. Sekhemu

    Sekhemu Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Thanks again Sistah :wink:
     
  6. OldSoul

    OldSoul Permanent Black Man PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Interesting info from that link

    "...During the course of the 18th century the British perfected the Atlantic slave system. Indeed, it has been estimated that between 1700 and 1810 British merchants transported almost three million Africans across the Atlantic. That the British benefited from the Atlantic slave system is indisputable. Yet, paradoxically, it was also the British who led the struggle to bring this system to an end...
    After 1807 British anti-slavery entered a new phase. The Society for the Abolition of the Slave Trade gave way to the African Institution, whose principal aim was to ensure that the new legislation was enforced and that other countries followed Britain's example. The first of these objectives was soon realised. Persuading other countries to join Britain in outlawing the slave trade proved more difficult, however. Despite the efforts of the African Institution, and those of British ministers, the Congresses of Paris (1814) and Vienna (1815) both failed to reach specific agreement, not least because of French opposition. The results of the Aix la Chapelle Congress in 1818 were equally unsatisfactory.
    The failure of the British to sway foreign powers forced abolitionists to rethink their ideas. So, too, did reports from the West Indies which suggested that conditions on the plantations had hardly improved since 1807. The situation seemed to call for more direct action, namely an attack on the institution of slavery itself...
    The first reformed Parliament was clearly sympathetic to abolition; perhaps just as important the Cabinet was ready to accept emancipation. In May 1833 Lord Stanley presented a plan to Parliament which finally passed into law on August 29. In essence, the new legislation called for the gradual abolition of slavery. Everyone over the age of six on August 1, 1834, when the law went into effect, was required to serve an apprenticeship of four years in the case of domestics and six years in the case of field hands (apprenticeship was later abolished by Parliament in 1838). By way of compensation the West Indian planters received £20 million...This remarkable story raises a simple but crucial question: why did the British turn against slavery and the slave trade?...[It was]a shift in economic thought. In the British case slavery flourished because West Indian planters were effectively subsidised by the British taxpayer. By the late 1820s, when many Britons began to see the benefits of a world economy untrammelled by restrictions and controls, such privileges seemed outmoded and frankly unwarranted. Indeed, it is probably true to say that the British slave system was 'not so much rendered unprofitable, but by-passed by the changing economic and social order in Britain'."

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/society_culture/protest_reform/antislavery_01.shtml

    By the way, the article says that "...43,000 people are estimated to be in bonded labour....", and above it's stated that "...A Nigerian study has found that almost 8% of the population are slaves....", but the population of Niger is approx 10,075,511. African Country Populations.
    I mention this because the numbers dont add up and because of the source and motives of the organization behind the article: "Timidria is receiving the 2004 Anti-Slavery Award on 3 November at Chatham House in London from Anti-Slavery International for fighting slavery in Niger. "
    Just seeking to input some balance is all...
     
  7. Oba Iparankanru

    Oba Iparankanru Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Most of the slavers in niger and mali are arab but some are black some hausa are slavers in mali/niger, but in mauritania it is all arab slavery, it's been ignored but it has been going on long before their european brothers came to africa.
     
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