Black History Culture : Slavery Documents.........

Discussion in 'Black History - Culture - Panafricanism' started by info-moetry, Feb 10, 2012.

  1. info-moetry

    info-moetry STAFF STAFF

    Country:
    United States
    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2004
    Messages:
    10,724
    Likes Received:
    6,428
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    A+ technician
    Location:
    The rotten Apple
    Ratings:
    +6,486
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    the dark face of slavery photos/Daguerreotype image of the Cazenovia Fugitive Slave Law Convention held on 21 and 22 August 1850

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  2. info-moetry

    info-moetry STAFF STAFF

    Country:
    United States
    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2004
    Messages:
    10,724
    Likes Received:
    6,428
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    A+ technician
    Location:
    The rotten Apple
    Ratings:
    +6,486
  3. info-moetry

    info-moetry STAFF STAFF

    Country:
    United States
    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2004
    Messages:
    10,724
    Likes Received:
    6,428
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    A+ technician
    Location:
    The rotten Apple
    Ratings:
    +6,486
  4. info-moetry

    info-moetry STAFF STAFF

    Country:
    United States
    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2004
    Messages:
    10,724
    Likes Received:
    6,428
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    A+ technician
    Location:
    The rotten Apple
    Ratings:
    +6,486
  5. info-moetry

    info-moetry STAFF STAFF

    Country:
    United States
    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2004
    Messages:
    10,724
    Likes Received:
    6,428
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    A+ technician
    Location:
    The rotten Apple
    Ratings:
    +6,486
  6. info-moetry

    info-moetry STAFF STAFF

    Country:
    United States
    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2004
    Messages:
    10,724
    Likes Received:
    6,428
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    A+ technician
    Location:
    The rotten Apple
    Ratings:
    +6,486
  7. THE-GOD

    THE-GOD Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2008
    Messages:
    581
    Likes Received:
    114
    Gender:
    Male
    Ratings:
    +128
    I can't understand any of that cursive
     
  8. info-moetry

    info-moetry STAFF STAFF

    Country:
    United States
    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2004
    Messages:
    10,724
    Likes Received:
    6,428
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    A+ technician
    Location:
    The rotten Apple
    Ratings:
    +6,486
    Suggestion: Try opening your 'eye' a little more.......... other than that, maybe what's in cursive is not for you to 'understand'.
     
    • Like Like x 1
    • Agree Agree x 1
    • List
  9. info-moetry

    info-moetry STAFF STAFF

    Country:
    United States
    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2004
    Messages:
    10,724
    Likes Received:
    6,428
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    A+ technician
    Location:
    The rotten Apple
    Ratings:
    +6,486
    My sixth sense started tingling when i read this one and i think it's a fraud.




     
  10. info-moetry

    info-moetry STAFF STAFF

    Country:
    United States
    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2004
    Messages:
    10,724
    Likes Received:
    6,428
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    A+ technician
    Location:
    The rotten Apple
    Ratings:
    +6,486
    SLAVERY in NEW YORK
    Systematic use of black slaves in New Netherland began in 1626, when the first cargo of 11 Africans was unloaded by the Dutch West India Company.
    The company had been founded in 1621, and it "operated both as a commercial company and as a military institution with quasi-statelike powers."[1] The company had tried its colonial experiment of New Netherland at first with agricultural laborers from Holland, but this plan went nowhere. Most of the Dutch who came to America sought to pile up money in the lucrative fur trade and then hurry back to the comforts of Holland to enjoy their wealth. So the company increasingly turned to slaves, which it already was importing in vast numbers to its Caribbean colonies.
    From the 1630s to the 1650s, the WIC "was unquestionably the dominant European slave trader in Africa."[2] In 1644 alone, it bought 6,900 captives on the African coast. Most of these went to the company's colonies in the West Indies, but from its stations in Angola, the company imported slaves to New Netherland to clear the forests, lay roads, build houses and public buildings, and grow food. It was company-owned slave labor that laid the foundations of modern New York, built its fortifications, and made agriculture flourish in the colony so that later white immigrants had an incentive to turn from fur trapping to farming.
    But private settlers still faced an acute shortage of agricultural labor that was retarding the colony. A company audit report noted that, "New Netherland would by slave labor be more extensively cultivated than it has hitherto been, because the agricultural laborers, who are conveyed thither at great expense to the colonists sooner or later apply themselves to trade, and neglect agriculture altogether."[3]
    As a result, the West India Company relaxed its monopoly and allowed New Netherlanders to trade their produce to Angola and "to convey Negroes back home to be employed in the cultivation of their lands." The company was willing to forego profit for the sake of spreading slavery in New Netherlands and getting the colony settled. It even allowed private owners to exchange slaves they were dissatisfied with for company slaves.
    But only a trickle of slaves flowed into New Netherland from Angola; the colonists found the Africans "proud and treacherous," and preferred to seek "seasoned" slaves from the West Indies, specifically Curaçao. In addition to those they bought from the West Indies, Dutch settlers bought slaves seized by privateers from Spanish ships. The steady flow from various sources allowed the colony to stabilize and, by 1640, to expand its agricultural output. "Slavery helped to prepare the way for this transition by providing the labor which made farming attractive and profitable to the settlers. Slave labor was especially important in the agricultural development of the Hudson Valley, where an acute scarcity of free workers prevailed."[4]
    Between 1636 and 1646 the price of able-bodied men in New Netherland rose about 300 percent. By 1660, slaves from Angola were selling for 300 guilders and those from Curaçao for about 100 guilders more. By the time the British took over the colony in 1664, slaves sold in New Amsterdam for up to 600 guilders. This was still a discount of roughly 10 percent over what they would have brought in the plantation colonies, but the West India Company had been subsidizing slavery in New Netherland to promote its economic progress. The Hudson Valley, where the land was monopolized in huge patroon estates that discouraged free immigration, especially relied on slaves.
    The purely economic status of slaves in New Netherland contrasted with the malignant and sometimes bizarre racism of the religious British citizens who followed the Dutch into the north Atlantic colonies. Free blacks in New Netherland were trusted to serve in the militias, and slaves, given arms, helped to defend the settlement during the desperate Indian war of 1641-44. They were even used to put down the Rensselaerswyck revolt of white tenants. Blacks and whites had coequal standing in the colonial courts, and free blacks were allowed to own property (Jews, however, were not). They intermarried freely with whites and in some cases owned white indentured servants.
    Slaves who had worked diligently for the company for a certain length of time were granted a "half-freedom" that allowed them liberty in exchange for an annual tribute to the company and a promise to work at certain times on company projects such as fortifications or public works. Individual slaveowners, such as Director General Peter Stuyvesant, adopted this system as well, and it enabled them to be free of the cost and nuisance of owning slaves year-round that they could only use in certain seasons. For the slaves, half-freedom was better than none at all.
     
Loading...