Black History Culture : Slavery & Colonial Williamsburg

Discussion in 'Black History - Culture - Panafricanism' started by PoeticManifesta, Jun 24, 2006.

  1. PoeticManifesta

    PoeticManifesta Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Hey Family,
    I just wanted to share a couple of things about the history and culture of my area of the world when relating to Williamsburg,va....
    These are a couple of clips.. from some ppl in colonial willamsburg, interpeters who portray slaves.

    African American Interpretation

    Harvey Bakari discusses the rich history of black Americans in Williamsburg. Monday, January 30, 2006
    http://www.colonialwilliamsburg.com/Media/podcasts_mp3s/AfricanAmericanInterpretation.mp3



    Emily James interprets spirited women

    Jamaican-born Emily James has interpreted at least 16 different 18th-century women who learned how to survive lives of enslavement. Monday, February 27, 2006
    http://www.colonialwilliamsburg.com/Media/podcasts_mp3s/EmilyJames.mp3

    Mr. Wythe's Cook
    (Mr.Wythe was the teacher of famously noted pale ppl such as ..Thomas Jefferson, Henry Clay, James Monroe, and John Marshall.)

    Valarie Holmes interprets Lydia Broadnax – a cook for one of Williamsburg’s most influential men.
    http://www.colonialwilliamsburg.com/Media/podcasts_mp3s/MrWythesCook.mp3

    Slave facts:




    Valerie Gray-Holmes portrays Lydia Broadnax.

    Listen to a Behind the Scenes Interview:
    Mr. Wythe's Cook.
    Valarie Holmes interprets Lydia Broadnax – a cook for one of Williamsburg’s most influential men.


    (MP3, 3.2Mb)
    View transcript

    This interview is part of an ongoing series of podcasts available on the Colonial Williamsburg site. Learn more.
    Lydia Broadnax
    Born ca. 1742
    Owned by George Wythe who eventually granted her freedom
    Remained in service to Wythe until his death
    Died between 1820 and 1827
    Buried on her own property in Richmond
    Member of the George Wythe Household


    Lydia Broadnax was George Wythe's slave and later his cook. Exactly when she joined George Wythe's household as a slave is unknown. She first appears in the official records in 1783, listed as a member of the Wythe household on the Williamsburg Personal Property Tax List. During her years in Williamsburg, records refer to her only as "Lydia" with no surname. Perhaps she appended her surname after Wythe freed her in 1787.

    Accounts of circumstances surrounding Wythe's death in 1806 make it clear that Lydia was Wythe's cook at that time. She probably had been his cook since her emancipation in 1787. She is thought to have witnessed the poisoning of George Wythe, but she was not allowed to testify against a white man, who went free for lack of evidence.

    Another member of Wythe's household, Ben, also remained with Wythe. It is highly probable that Lydia Broadnax was his wife, although there is no evidence that she was married or that she ever had children.

    Buried on her own property

    Lydia Broadnax's will was written September 25, 1820, and probated February 26, 1827. Her will indicates that she owned a house and lot in Richmond and that she wanted to be buried on her property. Lydia signed the will with a mark probably because of failing eyesight. She had written a letter to Thomas Jefferson April 9, 1807 in her own hand asking for money to purchase eyeglasses.

    Eve
    Date of birth unknown
    Belonged to Peyton Randolph household
    Date of death unknown
    Highly-valued slave


    Eve was one of 27 slaves who belonged to the Peyton Randolph household in 1775, the year of Peyton Randolph's death. Valued at 100 pounds, Eve was the highest-valued female slave and one of the most valuable of all the slaves, suggesting that she was of prime age and highly skilled. In his will, Randolph bequeathed "Eve and her children" to his wife, Betty Randolph.

    Ran away from household

    One month after Peyton Randolph's death, Lord Dunmore issued a proclamation that offered "freedom to any slaves who desert rebellious masters and who serve in the king's forces." Eve evidently responded to the call, as Randolph's probate inventory of January 5, 1776, listed eight slaves from the estate, including Eve, as "gone to the enemy."

    Evidence suggests Eve returned, either by force or choice, to the widow Betty Randolph, because in her will of October 1780, Betty Randolph gave "Eve and her son George" to Randolph's niece. A July 1782 codicil to her will stated that "Eve's bad behavior laid me under the necessity of selling her."
     
  2. PoeticManifesta

    PoeticManifesta Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Country:
    United States
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    I must say, despite the beginnings of American slavery having started here, this is the safest and friendliest place Ive ever been. Having been a military brat for 5 years of my teenage days..
    I feel proud actually to call this place home, it really shows how far we have come with so much history literally im my back yard.
    Sure theres more road ahead..
    but it gives me strength to see that..
    anything is possible!

    (Especially when I had a white woman, massage the hell outta my feet and calves yesterday and literally jumped at her 10$ TIP.. HAHAH) OHH.. did i type that aloud? haha
     
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