Sister's Only Chat : Sister Chat Recap, 4/9/07

Discussion in 'Black Women - Mothers - Sisters - Daughters' started by watzinaname, Apr 11, 2007.

  1. watzinaname

    watzinaname Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    We had such a wonderful chat, just thinking about it makes me smile. :) I had some technical difficulties towards the end, sorry sisters. What I was attempting to say before I disconnected, was that it was a joy to be able to just kick back and discuss something that we all had in common. I felt that we all knew that not only were we understood, but overstood. There's such peace in that.
    So let's bring back those questions and recap.

    1. Do you think that our hair is beautiful in it's natural state?
    Unanimously...YES. Our hair is beautiful because it's just that...our hair.

    2. What are some of the things you were told about your hair by your family when you were growing up?
    We've heard things like thick, nappy, tangled, hard to comb, etc.

    3. How do you wear your hair? Natural? Permed? Pressed? Do you have braids, curls, spirals, locs, twists?
    None of the sisters present currently have perms. We wear our hair natural, braided, occasionally pressed... Our hairstyles vary just as much as our personalities do.

    4. Is the manner in which you wear your hair now, the same as in your youth? In other words, if it's permed now, has it been that way since you were a child? If it's natural now, have you always worn it that way?
    One of our sisters has never gotten her hair permed, but most of us have previously. In the past we kept our hair straight, if not by chemicals, then it was with a hot comb.
    5. Have you ever worn your hair in a way to please someone else? Friends or family? A man, be it your significant other, or a possible future significant other? Society?
    The general consensus was that we have altered our hair for others.... friends, family, men, society...at one time or another. But now we're most likely to wear it as we desire, and others will just have to accept that.

    Thank you to all the terrific sisters who participated! ;)

    Peace,
    Watz
     
  2. truetothecause

    truetothecause Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    I could not be there

    Hotep Sis Watz and all the Sister's on the forum and participants of the chat session.

    My current schedule does not allow me to be available for Monday nite chats....yet....i grew up on the cliche..."when life gives you lemons, make lemonade"..
    So, I'd like to add my two cents now and hopefully can add prior to the actual chat sessions since Sis Watz does a great job at keeping us abreast of upcoming topics and questions to stimulate thoughts for the conversations to take place.

    I, like the majority currently wear my hair natural. I have had Nubian Locks for the past 13 years now. Prior to that, I wore braids for about 5 years after my 'jerii curl' days. So, yes..I have had my hair first pressed with lard as a young child, permed as a young adult then the curl thing.
    Growing up, my hair was described as "steel wool" and it was a **** getting it combed and pressed..only for the straight to sweat out in a couple hours. I had "bad hair" and was teased about it for many years. Once I started locking tho...was the first time I received compliments about my hair in it's natural state. I get stopped on the street by sisters wanting to know how to start theirs or to simply compliment it.

    Not too many ppl belived my locks would last as long as they have..cause i've been known to change my style frequently, however..i don't see myself doing anything else with it cept learn more lock styles. It has been a rough beginning and took a lot of creativity until they grew out and had some lenght to them.

    I've been reading and researching more on Trauma and Afreekan Descendents and came across this last nite....I thought about US and this topic and wanted to post it. this is a few excerpts from the book 'Slavery:The African American Psychic Trauma: by Sultan and Naimah Latif:

    "Hair texture is mor than a fashion statement. It has deeply political overtones, particularly in [amerikkka]. In slavery times, when blacks would escape north and "pass" for white, hari texture was one of the things that could be a diead giveaway"....for a brief moment during the late 1960's and early 1970's, the political significance of hari texture was recognized....Afro hairstyle as a symbol of cultural prode. It began as a symbol of rejection of European beauty standards, a symbol of definace of whitte society, a sign of political militancy" "Relaxed hair. What was it befor--tense? Nervous? Uptight?"
    "Hair lenght is also a main focus when determining who is beautiful...so many men have been attracted to black women with long hair, only to later turn away in disappointment when they found out the hai was not really thier own. To this day, hair length is such an issue that women who wear pieces are often afraid to admit...: (pgs. 233-236)..

    This book was written in 1994...since that time....weaves have been discovered and become a way of life for many Women of Afreekan Descent.

    Thanks for allowing me to share!
     
  3. watzinaname

    watzinaname Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Your presence in Sister Chat has been missed truetothecause, thank you for coming up with a way to still participate with us. :)


    SMH, some of the sisters who attended chat also shared stories...combs breaking, painful straightening, hair that would just plain fight ya back. Must have made you feel so good to get those compliments, with sisters wanting their hair to look like yours.

    I guess that's what happens when you find a style that you are comfortable with. I usually just pull my hair back. People still want me to "do something with it", but this is a no fuss style I feel comfortable with. You used to have a picture of yourself as your avatar...QQn. Such a beautiful sister with those locks.

    Hair as a political statement, yes, that's true. And an unnecessary extra added burden to us... Wearing our hair in its natural state, should be just like breathing... But sometimes instead, it is like a weight has been placed on top of our heads. Thank you for sharing the book excerpts, and for deciding to make that lemonade. :) Much appreciated sister true2, hotep.
     
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