Black People : Shoshana Johnson Jessica Lynch

Discussion in 'Black People Open Forum' started by ConspiracyDog, Jun 19, 2003.

  1. ConspiracyDog

    ConspiracyDog Member MEMBER

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    NBC is going to make a move about Jessica Lynch and from what I understand she is being offered big book deals to. When you see the name Jessica Lynch it’s always in the company of words like values, honor, daring operation and heroism she is Americas golden girl. Now what I want to know is why Shoshana Johnson has just simply vanished from the media eye, was she not she shot! Or was it just my imagination what is it? Was she not pretty enough? Was her family not as supportive enough? OR WAS IT THAT SHE WAS NOT WHITE enough. Perhaps it was Jessica’s last name that the press was impressed with Lynch!
    There was an outdoor interview with the family rep of Shoshana Johnson this is when she was released.
    The rep asked the press “do you have any questions” not one person did, and this was her hometown. I also noticed that she was treated just like any other POW even by other blacks. But now we have super honky Jessica Lynch! Golden goddess of the war.
     
  2. happy69

    happy69 Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Dog;
    This is not a conspiracy this is a reality... but while you worry if Whites and others will do what is right (or white guilt, as called by real anti-black conspirators like Walter E. Williams/ Jesse Lee "illiterate" Peterson/ Larry Elders); the Black community has embraced her... plus the man is sayin' that Lynch was a hoak!
     
  3. ConspiracyDog

    ConspiracyDog Member MEMBER

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  4. Kari

    Kari Member MEMBER

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    Hi Everyone,

    I was reading the post and noticed that the story of what really happened to Jessica lynch and how shoshana was ignored wasn't posted. I kept the story for myself and think this will anger some. I felt sad for Shoshana and angry that the real hero's were ignored.

    A Forgotten Story


    U.S. Army Spec. Shoshana Johnson limped slowly into the press conference at the Rayburn House Office building on June 12 and took a seat at the podium.
    The room was filled to capacity with well-wishers, including members of the Congressional Black Caucus. The politicians, family and supporters had assembled to honor the 30-year-old Army cook and single parent from Fort Bliss, Texas, who was captured during the opening days of the Iraq war.
    Yet throughout the proceedings, Johnson seemed subdued and uncomfortable. A shy, humble woman, she rarely smiled.
    "This is an honor I don't feel I deserve," said Johnson, in a soft, Southern drawl after being presented with a plaque and a flag. Her mother wept with pride.
    Johnson's words were befitting a hero. Yet throughout the simple ceremony, an undercurrent of tension prevailed. Well-wishers whispered that the Pentagon had tried to block the ceremony. Told that the press would not be allowed to ask questions and that Johnson was under strict orders not to talk, people wondered why.
    "This is an honor," people whispered, "they feel she doesn't deserve."
    The rumors and whispers and snide remarks appeared to be more than half true. Indeed, the caucus held the ceremony almost as an act of defiance.
    The caucus had hoped to give Shoshona an official resolution of Congress, but that plan had been blocked by House Republicans and Pentagon officials.
    "They weren't comfortable honoring someone of one particular race. They didn't want to single someone out," said caucus spokesman Doug Thornell, although the resolution would have made no mention of Johnson's ethnicity. Thornell said House Republicans argued that a resolution honoring all the prisoners of war that had been introduced earlier was sufficient.
    "They believed it would set a bad precedent," added Emile Milney, press secretary for Rep. Charles Rangel (D-N.Y.). "It was felt at the Pentagon, too. They shared the same sentiment."
    Nevertheless, the Black Caucus decided to honor Johnson, believed to be the first African-American woman to be taken as a prisoner of war, because they felt her heroics had been ignored.
    "It was a need to rectify the government's lack of recognition of her," said Milney. "They [the caucus] felt she had earned it. She has shown bravery and patriotism while serving her country."
    "Honoring you is like honoring ourselves," said Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee (D-Texas).
    "Miss Johnson's dedication to her job represents the highest ideals of patriotism and military service," said Rangel.
    Johnson was one of seven soldiers captured on March 23 during an ambush, when the 507th Maintenance Ordnance Company that supported the 3rd Infantry took a wrong turn.
    Three women soldiers were part of that ill-fated unit, Army Pfc. Lori Ann Piestewa, Pfc. Jessica Lynch and Johnson.
    Reportedly, Piestewa died from injuries she sustained when the vehicle she was driving crashed during the ambush. Piestewa was the first Native-American woman ever killed in combat. Last month, Native Americans successfully lobbied to have a mountain in Arizona named Piestewa Peak, although many Arizonians insist on retaining the old, racially offensive name, "Squaw Mountain," and the federal registry has yet to recognize the change.
    Johnson was shot twice and endured weeks of harsh captivity. She was one of those paraded before Iraqi cameras, with films shown around the world. Her face, wan with fear, was burned into the memories of people everywhere. She virtually disappeared after her return to the States.
    In contrast, Lynch has been hailed as a hero. The 20-year-old supply clerk apparently was held separate from the others.
    Then, on April 1, after 10 days in captivity, Lynch was rescued by a covert Special Forces Unit. And an early press account, apparently relying on Pentagon sources, claimed Lynch had been wounded after an incredible feat of heroism, emptying her M-16 into Iraqi soldiers even after sustaining multiple gunshot wounds.
    "She was fighting to the death," one unnamed official told the {Washington Post.} "She did not want to be taken alive."
    "Lynch continued firing at the Iraqis even after she sustained multiple gunshot wounds and watched several other soldiers in her unit die around her," claimed the {Post} on April 3, in a report that now has been largely discredited.
    The Pentagon now acknowledges that unlike Johnson, Lynch was never shot and probably never fired her weapon.
    Still, it is Lynch, described as "waif-like" and "blonde" from a small town in Palestine, W. Va., who has become a national hero. The {New York Times} reports that media outlets from CBS to MTV are bidding for her story, and that her family is wading through several million-dollar deals for books, documentaries and made-for-TV movies. The Lynch family, reported the {Times}, is expected to sign with an agent in the near future.
    All of this in spite of the reports that Lynch more closely resembled a "patient of war" rescued from a hospital full of hospital personnel, most of whom were treating Lynch for injuries sustained when her vehicle crashed into another vehicle while fleeing Iraqi forces. Lynch was not suffering from bullet or stab wounds. She never fired her gun.
    Three weeks later, Johnson emerged with her fellow soldiers, hobbling to the rescue helicopter, suffering from bullet wounds in her ankles. Rumors of her bravery never surfaced. Declarations of how she fought off her attackers were never reported. Tales of her bravery were never told. There were no documentaries with smiling former schoolteachers and friends with stories of her ambitious youth. Just as during her weeks of captivity, Johnson seemed to have disappeared.
    "I don't think anything should be taken from Jessica Lynch," said Milney. "I just wish they'd show more attention to Shoshana."
    At its June 12 tribute, the Black Caucus tribute thanked Johnson for "displaying bravery and heroism during Operation Iraqi Freedom." They gave her the plaque and the flag.
    Her family glowed with pride or wept quietly.
    Then Johnson was quickly whisked away.
     
  5. AACOOLDRE

    AACOOLDRE Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    I heard Lynch died in a car accident. Was she killed because she knew the operation to save her was a hoax and publicity stunt?
     
  6. Kari

    Kari Member MEMBER

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    It wasn't her

    I don't remember his name, but it was a marine that rode with her when they rescued her that was killed in a car accident.
     
  7. tigre35

    tigre35 Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    The REAL Story Of Private Lynch - The Biggest Lie Yet

    "the Lynch story was a hoax. She was injured in the car crash, well cared for by the Iraqi medical staff, they attempted to return her and were fired at by US soldiers, the US soldiers picked her up at the hospital...no Iraqi soldiers, unarmed doctors just doing their job..."

    leesa



    Published on Sunday, May 4, 2003 by the Toronto Star
    The Real 'Saving of Private Lynch'
    Iraqi Medical Staff Tell a Different Story Than US Military
    'We all became friends with her, we liked her so much'

    by Mitch Potter


    Branded on to our consciousness by media frenzy, the flawless midnight rescue of 19-year-old Private First Class Jessica Lynch hardly bears repeating even a month after the fact.

    Precision teams of U.S. Army Rangers and Navy Seals, acting on intelligence information and supported by four helicopter gunships, ended Lynch's nine-day Iraqi imprisonment in true Rambo style, raising America's spirits when it needed it most.

    All Hollywood could ever hope to have in a movie was there in this extraordinary feat of rescue — except, perhaps, the truth.

    The medical team that cared for Lynch at the hospital formerly known as Saddam Hospital is only now beginning to appreciate how grand a myth was built around the four hours the U.S. raiding party spent with them early on April Fool's Day.

    And they are disappointed.

    For Dr. Harith Houssona, 24, who came to consider Lynch a friend after nurturing her through the worst of her injuries, the ironies are almost beyond tabulation.

    "The most important thing to know is that the Iraqi soldiers and commanders had left the hospital almost two days earlier," Houssona said. "The night they left, a few of the senior medical staff tried to give Jessica back. We carefully moved her out of intensive care and into an ambulance and began to drive to the Americans, who were just one kilometer away. But when the ambulance got within 300 meters, they began to shoot. There wasn't even a chance to tell them `We have Jessica. Take her.'"



    "They asked me if any troops were still in the hospital and I said `No, they're all gone.' Then they asked about Uday Hussein, and again, I said `No,'" Hamoud said. "The translator seemed satisfied with my answers, but the soldiers were very nervous."

    At midnight, the sound of helicopters circling the hospital's upper floors sent staff scurrying for the x-ray department — the only part of the hospital with no outside windows. The power was cut, followed by small explosions as the raiding teams blasted through locked doors.

    A few minutes later, they heard a man's voice shout, "Go! Go! Go!" in English. Seconds later, the door burst open and a red laser light cut through the darkness, trained on the forehead of the chief resident.

    "We were pretty frightened. There were about 40 medical staff together in the x-ray department," said Dr. Anmar Uday, 24. "Everyone expected the Americans to come that day because the city had fallen. But we didn't expect them to blast through the doors like a Hollywood movie."

    Dr. Mudhafer Raazk, 27, observed dryly that two cameramen and a still photographer, also in uniform, accompanied the U.S. teams into the hospital. Maybe this was a movie after all.

    Separately, the Iraqi doctors describe how the tension fell away rapidly once the Americans realized no threat existed on the premises. A U.S. medic was led to Lynch's room as others secured the rest of the three-wing hospital. Several staff and patients were placed in plastic handcuffs, including, according to Houssona, one Iraqi civilian who was already immobilized with abdominal wounds from an earlier explosion.

    One group of soldiers returned to the x-ray room to ask about the bodies of missing U.S. soldiers and was led to a graveyard opposite the hospital's south wall. All were dead on arrival, the doctors say.

    "The whole thing lasted about four hours," Raazk said. "When they left, they turned to us and said `Thank you.' That was it."

    The Iraqi medical staff fanned out to assess the damage. In all, 12 doors were broken, a sterilized operating theatre contaminated, and the specialized traction bed in which Lynch had been placed was trashed.

    "That was a special bed, the only one like it in the hospital, but we gave it to Jessica because she was developing a bed sore," Houssona said.

    What bothers Raazk most is not what was said about Lynch's rescue, so much as what wasn't said about her time in hospital.

    "We all became friends with her, we liked her so much," Houssona said. "Especially because we all speak a little English, we were able to assure her the whole time that there was no danger, that she would go home soon."

    Initial reports indicated Lynch had been shot and stabbed after emptying her weapon in a pitched battle when her unit, the U.S. Army's 507th Ordnance Maintenance Company, was ambushed after its convoy became lost near Nasiriya.

    A few days after her release, Lynch's father told reporters none of the wounds were battle-related. The Iraqi doctors are more specific. Houssona said the injuries were blunt in nature, possible stemming from a fall from her vehicle.

    "She was in pretty bad shape. There was blunt trauma, resulting in compound fractures of the left femur (upper leg) and the right humerus (upper arm). And also a deep laceration on her head," Houssona said. "She took two pints of blood and we stabilized her. The cut required stitches to close. But the leg and arm injuries were more serious."



    But they all made a point of giving Lynch the best of everything, he added. Despite a scarcity of food, extra juice and cookie were scavenged for their American guest.

    They also assigned to Lynch the hospital's most nurturing nurse, Khalida Shinah. At 43, Shinah has three daughters close to Lynch's age. She immediately embraced her foreign patient as one of her own.

    "It was so scary for her," Shinah said through a translator. "Not only was she badly hurt, but she was in a strange country. I felt more like a mother than a nurse. I told her again and again, Allah would watch over her. And many nights I sang her to sleep."



    "At first, Jessica was very frightened. Everybody was poking their head in the room to see her and she said `Do they want to hurt me?' I told her, `Of course not. They're just curious. They've never seen anyone like you before.'

    "But after a few days, she began to relax. And she really bonded with Khalida. She told me, `I'm going to take her back to America with me."

    Three days before the U.S. raid, Lynch had regained enough strength that the team was ready to proceed with orthopedic surgery on her left leg. The procedure involved cutting through muscle to install a platinum plate to both ends of the compound fracture. "We only had three platinum plates left in our supply and at least 100 Iraqis were in need," Raazk said. "But we gave one to Jessica."

    A second surgery, and a second platinum plate, was scheduled for Lynch's fractured arm. But U.S. forces removed her before it took place, Raazk said.

    Three days after the raid, the doctors had a visit from one of their U.S. military counterparts. He came, they say, to thank them for the superb surgery.

    "He was an older doctor with gray hair and he wore a military uniform," Raazk said.

    "I told him he was very welcome, that it was our pleasure. And then I told him: `You do realize you could have just knocked on the door and we would have wheeled Jessica down to you, don't you?'

    "He was shocked when I told him the real story. That's when I realized this rescue probably didn't happen for propaganda reasons. I think this American army is just such a huge machine, the left hand never knows what the right hand is doing."

    What troubles the staff in Nasiriya most are reports that Lynch was abused while in their case. All vehemently deny it.

    Told of the allegation through an interpreter, nurse Shinah wells up with tears. Gathering herself, she responds quietly: "This is a lie. But why ask me? Why don't you ask Jessica what kind of treatment she received?"

    But that is easier said than done. At the Pentagon last week, U.S. Army spokesman Lt.-Col. Ryan Yantis said the door to Lynch remains closed as she continues her recovery at Washington's Walter Reed Army Medical Center.

    "Until such time as she wants to talk — and that's going to be no time soon, and it may be never at all — the press is simply going to have to wait."



    (She finally gets to go home next week. They've held her prisoner ALL THIS TIME and have placed a gag-order on her. They've probably have been brainwashing her. Her family has a gag-order, too. But, they'll talk.

    I can't WAIT to hear her tell what our government has done to her since she's been back, to cover it's lies.)
     
  8. NNQueen

    NNQueen going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Jessica is all over the news this week.

    I've often wondered about Shoshana and how she's doing physically and emotionally.

    I'm glad there is a mountain named Piestewa Peak. Go Native Americans!!

    "Nevertheless, the Black Caucus decided to honor Johnson, believed to be the first African-American woman to be taken as a prisoner of war, because they felt her heroics had been ignored."

    After reading this, I feel that every African American is a prisoner of war.
     
  9. Hesaid

    Hesaid Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    @XXPANTHAXX
    I was thinking the exact thing.
    Sometimes you can tell the thought cycle
    of non brothers or lost brothers even in
    their post.
    Not saying the Brotheres lost now
    But.............???

    ???Strange ???
    ???:confused: ???
    ?????????







    *
     
  10. NNQueen

    NNQueen going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    If my Brothers Jacuma and Hesaid will permit me, I'm curious about Jay Rivers and would like some clarity if he is willing to supply some.

    Jay Rivers, you wrote, and I quote...

    "your brother in the struggle to unite and build us into a people to be reckoned with..."

    Can you briefly summarize your ideas to explain how you go about doing this?

    Thank you.
     
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