Black Women : Shocking History: Why Women of Color in the 1800s Were Banned From Wearing Their Hair in Public

Discussion in 'Black Women - Mothers - Sisters - Daughters' started by Liberty, Nov 8, 2015.

  1. Liberty

    Liberty going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

    Country:
    United States
    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2015
    Messages:
    5,879
    Likes Received:
    1,127
    Gender:
    Female
    Ratings:
    +3,242
    [​IMG]
    Woman in Tignon

    “Did you know that in late 18th century Louisiana, black and multiracial women were ordered to cover their hair in public?” My sister asked me.

    “WOW. Really?” I replied.

    I’d probably heard of this in one of my black studies classes in undergrad, but who remembers everything they’ve been taught? Besides, this information felt instantly relevant and I was absolutely intrigued.

    It wasn’t unusual for me to feel myself gaining brain cells while in conversation with my sisters, but by the time I caught my racing thoughts so I could ask her some questions, it was time to take care of my baby girl. I knew, however that this was a topic worth visiting again.

    With a little digging I found that there was in fact a “law” of sorts that demanded women of color in Louisiana to cover their hair with a fabric cloth starting in 1789 as a part of what was called the Bando
    du buen gobierno (Edict for Good Government). What these rules were meant to do was try to curtail the growing influence of the free black population and keep the social order of the time. The edict included sections specifically about the changing of certain “unacceptable” behaviors of the free black women in the colony including putting an end to what he and others believed to be the overly ostentatious hairstyles of these ladies which drew the attention of white men, and the jealousy of white women. These rules are called the “Tignon Laws” A tignon (pronounced “tiyon”) is a headdress.


    [​IMG]

    Read more

    http://blackgirllonghair.com/2014/0...ere-banned-from-wearing-their-hair-in-public/
     
  2. Bootzey

    Bootzey Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Country:
    United States
    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2008
    Messages:
    1,903
    Likes Received:
    770
    Gender:
    Female
    Occupation:
    Don't Ask
    Location:
    Metro ATL
    Ratings:
    +863
    I knew this.

    This is why I choose to wear my hair wrapped everyday I leave the house. In solidarity. But also to remind him/devil of his grimy past crimes against humanity.
     
  3. IFE

    IFE Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Country:
    United States
    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2015
    Messages:
    1,033
    Likes Received:
    198
    Gender:
    Female
    Ratings:
    +551
    Please explain the solidarity?
     
  4. Bootzey

    Bootzey Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Country:
    United States
    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2008
    Messages:
    1,903
    Likes Received:
    770
    Gender:
    Female
    Occupation:
    Don't Ask
    Location:
    Metro ATL
    Ratings:
    +863
    sol·i·dar·i·ty
    ˌsäləˈderədē/
    noun
    1. 1.
      unity or agreement of feeling or action, especially among individuals with a common interest; mutual support within a group
     
  5. Angela22

    Angela22 Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Country:
    United States
    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2013
    Messages:
    6,583
    Likes Received:
    2,894
    Gender:
    Female
    Ratings:
    +3,317
    Interesting read.
     
Loading...

Users found this page by searching for:

  1. women of color banned from showing hair historically