Black Spirituality Religion : SECOND STRING

Discussion in 'Black Spirituality / Religion - General Discussion' started by Fine1952, Jan 25, 2013.

  1. Fine1952

    Fine1952 Happy Winter Solstice MEMBER

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    These are the second string. The first were wiped out, erased and thought forgotten until Vivian Hunter-Hindrew resurrected them from Greek Mythology. The profound author, Mami Zogbe, reveals the truth about these "African" women in three of her books: "The Sibyls", "Goddess Unveiled Volume I and II". There are also (2) links: http://www.amengansie.com/sibyl/sibyls.html & http://www.amengansie.com/sibyl/page2.html that reveal truths never before known in the modern world.

    The etymology of the word Sibyl as described in "The Sibylline Oracles" evolves from 2 words: the first "advisor, counsellor" and the second "the other God". The use of their name is of mixed origin: "prophetesses/priestesses of Mami Wata", "Sioi"- God and "Bule" --counsel.

    In addition, we must never forget the African Amazon Women who were the most skilled warriors in the world. It was they who tamed and rode hours "first". It was they who faught in the trojan war. It was they who build magnficent cities. It was they who protected the many shrines sprinkled all up and down the Nile and most principally around the Mediterrean Sea, especially Libya.
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    I found all 82 of their names: from A to X. However, the one that is most fascinating to me is Penthesilea, One Of The Amazon Queens of Antiquity. She lead a fearless group of women with one-breasted armor shields. This gear served as protection as well as accounted for their expert archery skills who no man possessed a that time in the world. Is is quoted that she said: "Not in strength are we inferior to men; the same our eyes, our limbs the same; one common light we see, one air we breathe; nor different is the food we eat. What then denied to us hath heaven on man bestowed." The rode chariots in battle in defense of the GODDESS and the Sibyls. The sight of which turned mens fearful hearts to stone.

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    Fine1952™
    © 2014
     
    Last edited: Jun 8, 2014
  2. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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    One of Dahomeys' women warriors, with a musket, club, dagger—and her enemy's severed head. From Forbes, Dahomy and the Dahomans (1851).


    [​IMG]

    September 23, 2011

    Dahomey’s Women Warriors



    ....Dahomey is renowned as a “Black Sparta,” a fiercely militaristic society bent on conquest, whose soldiers strike fear into their enemies all along what is still known as the Slave Coast. The maneuvers begin in the face of a looming downpour, but King Glele is eager to show off the finest unit in his army to his European guest.

    As Father Borghero fans himself, 3,000 heavily armed soldiers march into the square and begin a mock assault on a series of defenses designed to represent an enemy capital. The Dahomean troops are a fearsome sight, barefoot and bristling with clubs and knives. A few, known as Reapers, are armed with gleaming three-foot-long straight razors, each wielded two-handed and capable, the priest is told, of slicing a man clean in two.

    The soldiers advance in silence, reconnoitering. Their first obstacle is a wall—huge piles of acacia branches bristling with needle-sharp thorns, forming a barricade that stretches nearly 440 yards. The troops rush it furiously, ignoring the wounds that the two-inch-long thorns inflict. After scrambling to the top, they mime hand-to-hand combat with imaginary defenders, fall back, scale the thorn wall a second time, then storm a group of huts and drag a group of cringing “prisoners” to where Glele stands, assessing their performance. The bravest are presented with belts made from acacia thorns. Proud to show themselves impervious to pain, the warriors strap their trophies around their waists.

    The general who led the assault appears and gives a lengthy speech, comparing the valor of Dahomey’s warrior elite to that of European troops and suggesting that such equally brave peoples should never be enemies. Borghero listens, but his mind is wandering. He finds the general captivating: “slender but shapely, proud of bearing, but without affectation.” Not too tall, perhaps, nor excessively muscular. But then, of course, the general is a woman, as are all 3,000 of her troops. Father Borghero has been watching the King of Dahomey’s famed corps of “amazons,” as contemporary writers termed them—the only female soldiers in the world who then routinely served as combat troops....


    Read more: http://blogs.smithsonianmag.com/history/2011/09/dahomeys-women-warriors/#ixzz2JreeVBXg
    Follow us: @SmithsonianMag on Twitter
     
  3. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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    SLAVERY

    - “The Centuries of Horror and Shame”


    ....In Ouidah, then called Whydah, there were at the peek 5 slave fortresses; one French, one Portuguese, one British, one Dutch and one Danish. The fortresses served as business centers, and the trade of slaves was mainly made between the representatives on the fortresses and the kings of Abomey. King Agadja who ruled from 1708 to 1732 even used a slave ship as his emblem, symbolizing the prosperity it brought also to his kingdom...

    ...At the beginning of the slave trade, selling of prisoners of wars was sufficient, but as the trade developed nobody could feel safe....

    ....The kings had special units of solders that were used to capture slaves, the most famous being the “Amazones”: A much dreaded brigade of female soldiers. It is told that the kings preferred women, since they did not trust other men: Their slogan was “The women in the battle fields, the men on the farms!”.

    “I was living in a small and peaceful village called Togon, when one morning the king of Abomey sent his army to catch us. They were all women soldiers and they killed anyone who resisted”. This testimony came from a man named Kudjo Kazula, who was sold as a slave and departed from Ouidah in 1854 – long after the official abolition of slave trade.

    ....COMPLETE HERE: http://home.online.no/~annekie/slavery.htm
     
  4. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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    http://www.suppressedhistories.net/articles/warriors.html


    JAMAICA
    Nyabinghi, the "hidden queen" fought to free Africans from English slavery and rule. Also called Queen Muhmusa or Tahtahme, she inspired the Nyabinghi underpinnings of Rastafarianism.

    Nanny of the Maroons was born in Ghana, and folk history says that she came to Jamaica with the express purpose of becoming a high priestess and leader of her people, never having been a slave. She led the eastern Maroons based in Moreton, and forged an alliance with another group led by Cudjoe. (The name Maroons comes from the Spanish cimarron,meaning "gone back to the wild.")

    The Jamaican Maroons were the first people to force the English to sign a treaty with their subjects, on March 1, 1738. The lands conceded in this treaty formed a base for the Maroon's independent survival. One of these communities was named Nannytown after the female Ghanaian leader. Maroon country was so feared by the English that it became known as the "Land of Look-Behind."
    .
    AFRICAN AMERICAN WOMEN BEAT BACK SLAVECATCHERS
    In the summer of 1848, eight or ten people made it across the Ohio river in their northward flight from slavery. The slave catchers tracked them into town, but the bounty they were after turned out to be elusive:

    "The women began to gather from adjoining houses until the Amazons were about equal to the [slave-hunters]-- the former with shovels, tongs, washboards and rolling pins; the latter with revolvers, sword-canes and bowie-knives. Finally the beseigers decamped, leaving the Amazons in possession of the field, amid the jeers and loud huzzahs of the crowd."
    --Report from The North Star, an African-American paper out of Cincinnati, August 11, 1848. (For more, see Dorothy Sterling's book Speak Out In Thunder Tones.)
    GHANA
    "If you the men of Ashanti will not go forward, then we will. We the women will. I shall call upon you my fellow women. We will fight the white men. We will fight until the last of us falls in the battlefield."
    ---Ya Asantewa, an Ashanti queen who led the resistence to British colonial rule in Ghana. She succeeded in the short run, but the Ashanti were heavily outgunned.....
     
  5. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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  6. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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    The Dahomey Amazons were a Fon all-female military regiment of the Kingdom of Dahomey. ..
    King Houegbadja (who ruled from 1645 to 1685), the third King of Dahomey, is said to have originally started the group which would become the Amazons as a corps of elephant hunters called the gbeto. During the 18th century, the king had some of his wives trained as royal bodyguards.

    Houegbadja’s son King Agadja (ruling from 1708 to 1732) developed the female bodyguard into a militia and successfully used them in Dahomey’s defeat of the neighbouring kingdom of Savi in 1727. European merchants recorded their presence, as well as similar female warriors amongst the Ashanti. For the next hundred years or so, they gained reputation as fearless warriors. Though they fought rarely, they usually acquitted themselves well in battle.

    The group of female warriors was referred to as Mino, meaning “Our Mothers” in the Fon language by the male army of Dahomey.

    From the time of King Ghezo (ruling from 1818 to 1858), Dahomey became increasingly militaristic. Ghezo placed great importance on the army and increased its budget and formalized its structures. The Mino were rigorously trained, given uniforms, and equipped with Danish guns (obtained via the slave trade). By this time the Mino consisted of between 4000 and 6000 women, about a third of the entire Dahomey army.

    The Mino were recruited from among the ahosi (“king’s wives”) of which there were often hundreds. Some women in Fon society became ahosi voluntarily, while others were involuntarily enrolled if their husbands or fathers complained to the King about their behaviour. Membership among the Mino was supposed to hone any aggressive character traits for the purpose of war. During their membership they were not allowed to have children or be part of married life. Many of them were virgins. The regiment had a semi-sacred status, which was intertwined with the Fon belief in Vodun.

    The Mino trained with intense physical exercise. Discipline was emphasised. In the latter period, they were armed with Winchester rifles, clubs and knives. Units were under female command. Captives who fell into the hands of the Amazons were often decapitated.....

    ....cont.... http://diasporicroots.tumblr.com/post/3207950998/the-dahomey-amazons-the-dahomey-amazons-were-a
     
  7. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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  8. Fine1952

    Fine1952 Happy Winter Solstice MEMBER

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    Hello Cherry Blossom:

    Thanks for bringing the Dahomey Amazon Women into this topic! Know however, that this was "not" the first but the second wave of Amazon Women who were organized in West Africa and came under the rule of King Agadja. These are the "only" group of Amazon women that Western Civilization seem aware yet they were not the original builders, creators and expanders. Their rhein of the first wave of African Amazon Warriors was hundreds of years before the Dahomey Warriors emerged.

    The Sibyls: Demystifying the Absence of the African Ancestress
    by Vivian Hunter-Hindrew
    Martinez, GA: Mami Wata Healers Society of North America, Inc.: (2007)
    Page 37

    "...Overtime, the Amazons were eventually defeated world-wide, and erased from the annals of world history, or relegated to "Greek Mythology," their African identify and great history concealed. However, centuries later, in a daring act by West African Dahomean, King Agadja (1708-1732), a garrison of the Amazons were restored. An unprecedented move in which they served a patriarchal ruler rather than their queen mothers.

    The entire history of the black Amazons and the immense role they played in developing African spiritual history, culture and military expansion throughout the ancient world is beyond the scope of this book, and could easily take volumes. Their story is yet to be completely told..."

    "...Far from being localized to only ancient Dahomey by Western historians, the black Amazons, initiates of the African Mami deity Athena/Ar-themis/Epesia (Black Di-Ana) were the first organized batallion of female warriors in the world. They were a major militaristic contingency throughout all of ancient Africa. In defense of their matrirchies. Historically, they were called "Zon, zoan, On, etc., and a host of other names. They conquered lands and founded cities and built extraordinary temples, naming them after themselves or after their queen mother or goddess. Heliopolis in northern Egypt was orginally called Zoan. Cities in Thrace, Armenia, Cappaocia (ancent Turkey). In the Caucasus, Albania, Athens, Attica and elsewhere thought the ancient world were founded and named after these fearless black warriors...'

    I hope this is helpful.

    ILove,
    Fine:hearts1:
     
  9. Fine1952

    Fine1952 Happy Winter Solstice MEMBER

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  10. Omowale Jabali

    Omowale Jabali The Cosmic Journeyman PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Equipped with Danish guns obtained via the slave trade...
     
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