Africa : Scientific Mystery: Ancient Baobab Trees in Africa Dying at ‘Shocking’ Rate and No One Knows Why

Discussion in 'All Things Africa' started by Clyde C Coger Jr, Jun 13, 2018 at 11:23 PM.

  1. Clyde C Coger Jr

    Clyde C Coger Jr going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    In the Spirit of Sankofa,


    Scientific Mystery: Ancient Baobab Trees in Africa Dying at ‘Shocking’ Rate and No One Knows Why

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    Lisa Spear

    Newsweek


    The ancient baobab trees first sprouted on the African savannah about 1,500 years ago, inspiring awe and becoming an icon on the continent. Recognizable for their swollen trunks, one grew so large that a pub was constructed inside, attracting tourists from around the globe; then, two years ago, the tree began to split apart, and eventually, it completely fell to pieces...


    https://www.yahoo.com/news/scientific-mystery-ancient-baobab-trees-012128229.html
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    0611-Tree2


     
  2. Clyde C Coger Jr

    Clyde C Coger Jr going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    :facepalm:

    'Shocking' die-off of Africa's oldest baobabs: study
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    Mariëtte Le Roux

    AFP


    Paris (AFP) - Some of Africa's oldest and biggest baobab trees -- a few dating all the way back to the ancient Greeks -- have abruptly died, wholly or in part, in the past decade, researchers said Monday.


    https://www.yahoo.com/news/shocking-die-off-africas-oldest-baobabs-study-151401577.html
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    The iconic tree can live to be 3,000 years old and one in Zimbabwe is so large that up to 40 people can shelter inside its trunk (AFP Photo/Tony KARUMBA)