Pan Africanism : School beatings draw new scrutiny in Africa

Discussion in 'Black History - Culture - Panafricanism' started by Akilah, Nov 15, 2005.

  1. Akilah

    Akilah Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    When Kapurunje Uirab, 13, was accused of stealing a classmate's cell phone, his sixth-grade teacher beat him with a heavy metal pipe until he could barely walk. His family took him to a clinic where he was treated for lacerations and sore kidneys, according to medical records.

    "It really hurt to move my legs," said Kapurunje, speaking by phone from the distant town of Rundu, where he now attends a different school.

    "He had bleeding welts on his back and more on his legs," said his mother, Rita Uirab, 40, a housekeeper. "And his face, it had changed from a boy's face to a serious face of a man. We had to do something."

    Corporal punishment was far from unusual at Olof Palme primary school, where most classrooms had a metal pipe, goatskin whip or wooden paddle leaning in one corner. If students got a math problem wrong or arrived late, they could be beaten.

    Recently, this long-accepted tool of classroom discipline has come under unprecedented scrutiny, in part because of cases like Kapurunje's, in which the teacher was convicted of assault after the boy's mother filed charges.

    Corporal punishment is practiced across much of Africa. And as Kapurunje's case illustrates, tradition remains a powerful force in determining what educators, officials and parents view as the proper way to raise and control children.

    In many African societies, authority is rarely questioned, wife-beating is permitted, and women and children have low status. Underpaid teachers with little training -- many of whom were once beaten by colonial schoolmasters -must handle classrooms with as many as 100 students.

    http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/10032248/
     
  2. soulsearcher

    soulsearcher Banned MEMBER

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    If a culture has a practice that is hurting people, the it's obvious that culture needs to reevaluate that particular practice. So, how can cultural viewpoint be changed for that particular issue in their society to prevent it from going to that extreme?

    I personally have no issue with physical discipline. A smack on the hand, or a belt to the bottom... sometimes that does do the trick for young kids. It hurts but it doesn't cause major injury. But some people both here and abroad take that too far and don't have too many laws for children's rights. So how does one find the balance?
     
  3. dustyelbow

    dustyelbow Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Underpaid teachers with little training -- many of whom were once beaten by colonial schoolmasters -must handle classrooms with as many as 100 students.

    This is all I need from this article.

    So who values the teachers more? The colonial schoolmaster or current government appointed school master. Or the students and community.
    It seems the community values the teacher more but the teacher does not 'live' off the student and community but on the colonial schoolmaster or current government appointed school master.

    Because of this role, the students recieve the brunt of unnecessary and cruel beatings on the part of 'underpaid' teacher. Taking out the frustrations on students who value their tutilage instead of the school system is weak and I am glad the mother of this young boy has stood on principle or justice against the community and school system to shine some light on the situation.

    This psychological effect manifest itself in all peoples and I dont believe this to be placed solely on 'African' traditions. Its an attempt to explain something as 'tradition' without actually understanding the situation in great depth.

    Let me ask everyone would you punish someone directly because you do not get the 'respect', money, power etc from those you 'live' off and with that someone who is eager for you to teach and aid them in life. It's not a tough choice at first but applying it everyday of our lives some of us will fumble.

    And we see the fumble here in this article.
     
  4. pdiane

    pdiane Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    When I was staying in Senegal. The room my husband and I lived in was above a school. The teacher would beat the students who did not behave or know their lessons. This definitely passed on from the French during colonial times. The beatings made me cringe. It is really is bad. Children have no rights in Afraka, that is for sure.
     
  5. Dual Karnayn

    Dual Karnayn Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Let me first say that I don't condone abuse.

    But Black children need strict discipline in order to grow up properly....there is no other way around it.

    The need a strong stick put on that a*ss!


    I don't know about white kids, Oriental kids, Indian kids, or Native American kids nor what it takes to get them to listen.....so don't even bring them into the conversation.

    We're talking about BLACK KIDS and BLACK KIDS will fucck over you in a minute if they think they can get away with it.
    They'll grow up thinking they're smart and become misguided and undisciplined adults.

    One of the reasons why we as AfroAmericans act the way we do today and have no discipline and respect for authority is becuase many of us didn't get that stick put on our behinds as a child.
    Many of us grew up without fathers...especially children today and that authority wasn't drilled into us.

    Too many are growing up thinking they can do and say whatever they want TO whomever they want and can't nobody do anything about it. So when they come across a police officer with that attitude they end up getting beat up or killed.



    Like that police officer said in in Public Enemy's song Fucck Outta Dodge.

    "I ain't ya mamma and I ain't ya pops...
    Turn the music down or ya might get shot..."


    If you notice, Africans and West Indian children are far more intelligent, educated, disciplined, respectful than many of these little crumb-snatchers running around in the hood who won't even get out of the way of an on-coming car.

    Why do you think that is?
     
  6. pdiane

    pdiane Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    I have to clarify what I said. Children do not have rights in terms of getting corporal punishement from parents, teachers and adults. Comparing children from Afraka and Afrakan children from amerikkka is difficult however, because in Afraka, most children come from 2 parent households, even if the husband has more than one wife, his prescence is seen and felt.

    The manliness of Afrakan fathers, the rites of passage, the village trully raising children is prevalent in Afraka. Boys know their roles, girls know their roles. During festivals and celebrations, men are present amoung their children, quite often the boys are dressed like their fathers and the girls like their mothers. Much much respect is given to the father, mother, grandparents, aunts, uncles. Traditions passed down for centeries exist and are taught to the next generation.

    All of this functioanal living causes most families not to have to inflict corporal punishement on children. Of course children will be children, but the peace is trully there. Most men in Afraka have good memories of their fathers, having worked with them or being trained by them in some manner. The families are basically in tact.

    Now compare that to AA in amerikkka. 70% single parenthood. Fathers, brothers etc, not there, in the criminal justice system, gay, crazy, and the list goes on. Disfunctionality in our families is the rule of thumb in amerikkka. Beatings don't make things better either, quite often worse. Funtional loving families rarely exist. I work for a school department. When I see the father present it is odd. It was designed this way and unfortunately we maintian this horrific system because of the vestiges of slavery.
     
  7. dustyelbow

    dustyelbow Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    The presence of the father do more than what we see everyday as 'normal' in communities. Especially in our downtrodden communities. There was a study of fathers and sons and it said if the father watched sports on tv and in the field the son would pick up on the values of the father to do well in sports for his approval.

    Similarly if the father participates in PTA meetings at their local public schools the son would pick up the message that he should do well in school for his father approval.

    I can easily translate this into our very own communities with the father cursing, not being around for encouragement, arguing, drinking, smoking, ridiculing others, into amassing women as sport, the son picks up on this and does the same to perhaps get his fathers indirect approval.

    Its a dangerous cycle we find our communities in. Somewhere down the line it will spread like a virus to all members of society. It did not start in our communities but this type of behavior was targetted in our communities to manifest itself and now its already spreading to other formally fortified communities ie white middle class, etc.

    I agree if we continue with the same behaviors but just add beatings to the list is not a prescription for community wellness.
     
  8. Dual Karnayn

    Dual Karnayn Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    I think diet also plays a major role in the difference of how African children verse how AfroAmerican children develop mentally and emotionally.

    Their diet of fresh meat, vegetables and fewer starches and dairy product is more in tune with thier biological nature and chemistry.

    Our diet of junk food, synthetic drugs, and too much starch wrecks our bodies and minds and jacks our children up even before they come out of the womb.

    They come out crazy and uncontrolable.
     
  9. dustyelbow

    dustyelbow Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Underpaid and lack of growth is generally what teachers wish to address to their government in Africa but in this case students realize this too ie (their future) and got caught up in the battle. Beating students for these lack in your life as a reason to cause injury to students is wrong and does not change the fundamental problem. Disiplining of children is another matter which involves in my opinion more than the school as the sole place for this to happen, society families and individuals would need to be responsible too or authority.

    Again where is the scrutiny in the way African states respond to their people needs. Is being scared of losing your life to address a wrong to abusing authorities but beating students because of it is traditional? In this case should the authority not be challenged because it is so un-African even when wrong is done on a continious basis to not even be considered as a callous error or miscalculation.

    There is always other way to address problems without much conflict and loss of life but I just want to add some questions using the logic above.
     
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