Black Christians : "Salt in the Stew"

Discussion in 'Christian Study Group' started by cherryblossom, Oct 9, 2009.

  1. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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    A Covenant of Salt
    By Susan E. Todd
    April, 2003



    (2 Chronicles 13:5) "Ought ye not to know that the LORD God of Israel gave the kingdom over Israel to David for ever, even to him and to his sons by a covenant of salt?"

    The phrase "covenant of salt" is mentioned three times in the Scriptures. That's a trinity. That means God is in it somehow. Let's see if we can find out what He wants to teach us about salt. The other two references are:

    (Numbers 18:19) "All the heave offerings of the holy things, which the children of Israel offer unto the LORD, have I given thee, and thy sons and thy daughters with thee, by a statute for ever: it is a covenant of salt for ever before the LORD unto thee and to thy seed with thee." and (Leviticus 2:13) "And every oblation of thy meat offering shalt thou season with salt; neither shalt thou suffer the salt of the covenant of thy God to be lacking from thy meat offering: with all thine offerings thou shalt offer salt."

    God made covenants with people using unusual objects.

    With Noah He used a rainbow.
    (Genesis 9:15-17) "And I will remember my covenant, which is between me and you and every living creature of all flesh; and the waters shall no more become a flood to destroy all flesh. And the bow shall be in the cloud; and I will look upon it, that I may remember the everlasting covenant between God and every living creature of all flesh that is upon the earth. And God said unto Noah, This is the token of the covenant, which I have established between me and all flesh that is upon the earth."
    With Abraham He used the stars.
    (Genesis 15:5,18) "And he brought him forth abroad, and said, Look now toward heaven, and tell the stars, if thou be able to number them: and he said unto him, So shall thy seed be. In the same day the LORD made a covenant with Abram, saying, Unto thy seed have I given this land, from the river of Egypt unto the great river, the river Euphrates:"
    With Moses He used tablets of stone.
    (Exodus 34:28) "And he was there with the LORD forty days and forty nights; he did neither eat bread, nor drink water. And he wrote upon the tables the words of the covenant, the ten commandments."
    With David it was salt.
    (2 Chronicles 13:5) "Ought ye not to know that the LORD God of Israel gave the kingdom over Israel to David for ever, even to him and to his sons by a covenant of salt?"


    What is salt? By definition it is: A substance used for seasoning certain kinds of food, and for the preservation of meat.

    For what purpose was it made?

    To season: To render palatable, or to give a higher relish to, by the addition or mixture of another substance more pungent or pleasant; as, to season meat with salt.

    To preserve: To save from decay. Salt is used to preserve meat.

    To cure: To dry; to prepare for preservation; as, to prepare by salt, or in any manner, so as to prevent speedy purification.

    Why is salt important in a Christian's life?

    Jesus said in Matthew 5:13a, "Ye are the salt of the earth:" What did He mean?

    The Bible teaches us that we, as Christians, are to be salt in the world. We are to be a seasoning, a preservative and a cure in a world full of sin and hatred toward God and the things of God.....

    CONT...
     
  2. awo dino

    awo dino Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    History of Salt in Religion

    Salt has long held an important place in religion and culture. Greek worshippers consecrated salt in their rituals. Jewish Temple offerings included salt; on the Sabbath, Jews still dip their bread in salt as a remembrance of those sacrifices. In the Old Testament, Lot's wife was turned into a pillar of salt. Author Sallie Tisdale notes that salt is as free as the water suspending it when it's dissolved, and as immutable as stone when it's dry - a fitting duality for Lot's wife, who overlooks Sodom to this day.

    Covenants in both the Old and New Testaments were often sealed with salt: the origin of the word "salvation." In the Catholic Church, salt is or has been used in a variety of purifying rituals. In fact, until Vatican II, a small taste of salt was placed on a baby's lip at his or her baptism. Jesus called his disciples "the Salt of the Earth." In Leonardo DaVinci's famous painting, "The Last Supper," Judas Escariot has just spilled a bowl of salt - a portent of evil and bad luck. To this day, the tradition endures that someone who spills salt should throw a pinch over his left shoulder to ward off any devils that may be lurking behind.

    In Buddhist tradition, salt repels evil spirits. That's why it's customary to throw salt over your shoulder before entering your house after a funeral: it scares off any evil spirits that may be clinging to your back.

    Shinto religion also uses salt to purify an area. Before sumo wrestlers enter the ring for a match - which is actually an elaborate Shinto rite - a handful of salt is thrown into the center to drive off malevolent spirits.

    In the Southwest, the Pueblo worship the Salt Mother. Other native tribes had significant restrictions on who was permitted to eat salt. Hopi legend holds that the angry Warrior Twins punished mankind by placing valuable salt deposits far from civilization, requiring hard work and bravery to harvest the precious mineral.

    In 1933, the Dalai Lama was buried sitting up in a bed of salt.

    Today, a gift of salt endures in India as a potent symbol of good luck and a reference to Mahatma Gandhi's liberation of India, which included a symbolic walk to the sea to gather tax-free salt for the nation's poor.
     
  3. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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    Salt In The Bible

    The role of salt in the Bible is relevant to understanding Hebrew society during the Old Testament and New Testament periods. Salt is a necessity of life and was a mineral that was used since ancient times in many cultures as a seasoning, a preservative, a disinfectant, a component of ceremonial offerings, and as a unit of exchange. The Bible contains numerous references to salt. In various contexts, it is used metaphorically to signify permanence, loyalty, durability, fidelity, usefulness, value, and purification.

    Salt in the Old Testament

    The Hebrew people harvested salt by pouring sea water into pits and letting the water evaporate until only salt was left. They used the mineral for seasoning and as a preservative. In addition, salt was used to disinfect wounds.

    Salt also had a significant place in Hebrew worship. Salt was included in the Levitical offerings, since salt was emblematic of permanence or loyalty. In Leviticus 2:13, God commanded that "And every offering of your grain offering you shall season with salt; you shall not allow the salt of the covenant of your God to be lacking from your grain offering. With all your offerings you shall offer salt." Salt was cast on the burnt offering (Ezekiel 43:24) and was part of the incense (Exodus 30:35). Part of the temple offering included salt (Ezra 6:9).

    Salt was also used to ratify covenants. In Numbers 18:19, God promises to provide, through the offerings of His people, for His priests forever: "All the heave offerings of the holy things, which the children of Israel offer to the LORD, I have given to you and your sons and daughters with you as an ordinance forever; it is a covenant of salt forever before the LORD with you and your descendants with you." Salt cannot be burned or destroyed. Perhaps because of salt’s durability, God used it as a metaphor to indicate that as salt keeps its flavor, so the Lord’s covenant with the priesthood was durable. More likely, however, is that the "covenant of salt" (or, in some versions, "inviolable covenant") refers to a practice that rendered contracts irrevocable during the time period in which the Bible was written. In biblical times, men carried pouches of salt on their belts. When a pact, promise, or contract was made, the men from each of the participating parties would intermingle the salt from their own pouches with the salt from the pouches of the other party. This reminded the men that they could not retrieve their own salt from the other pouch, symbolizing the fact that they could not go back on their word.

    Another reference to the use of salt to ratify a covenant occurs at 2 Chronicles 13:5. At the beginning of this chapter, Abijah, King of Judah and rightful heir to David’s throne, is at war with King Jeroboam, who has taken control of Israel. Before Jeroboam’s destruction, Abijah speaks of the Davidic Covenant: "Hear me, Jeroboam and all Israel: Should you not know that the LORD God of Israel gave the dominion over Israel to David forever, to him and his sons, by a covenant of salt?" Here, salt refers to God’s irrevocable pledge and intended loyalty in fulfilling the Davidic covenant and God’s desire for the loyalty of David’s lineage to Him if the people are to enjoy the blessings of the covenant. The preservative quality of salt represents the fidelity or loyalty intended in keeping the covenant.

    Newborn babies (because of what the Lord commanded) were rubbed with salt to promote good health. A reference to this practice is in Ezekiel 16:4: "As for your nativity, on the day you were born your navel cord was not cut, nor were you washed in water to cleanse you; you were not rubbed with salt nor wrapped in swaddling cloths."

    In the Book of Genesis, chapter 19 the wife of Lot was turned into a pillar of salt when she disobeyed the command of God and looked back at the city of Sodom whilst fleeing from its destruction. Some Christians see this to mean literal salt whilst some think it refers to rock salt.

    Salt in the New Testament

    The Salt and Light metaphors in the Sermon on the Mount include a direct reference to salt: "You are the salt of the earth. But if salt loses its taste, with what can it be seasoned? It is no longer good for anything but to be thrown out and trampled underfoot." (Matthew 5:13). This verse is paralleled in Luke 14:34-35: "Salt is good, but if salt itself loses its taste, with what can its flavor be restored? It is fit neither for the soil nor for the manure pile; it is thrown out. Whoever has ears to hear ought to hear." Similarly, in Mark 9:49-50, Jesus says that "Everyone will be salted with fire. Salt is good, but if salt becomes insipid, with what will you restore its flavor? Keep salt in yourselves and you will have peace with one another."

    It is unclear whether Jesus is referring to the use of salt as a seasoning, as a preservative, for sacramental purposes, or some combination of these uses.
    Perhaps Jesus is simply saying that everybody has inherent value. Keep God’s gift of inherent worth inside yourself (cherish God's gift) and you will have peace with one another.

    The salt that has "lost its taste" or "become insipid" may refer to a type of salt common in the Dead Sea area that is contaminated with gypsum and other minerals. It has a flat taste and is ineffective as a preservative. Such mineral salts were useful for little more than keeping footpaths free of vegetation. That may be why Jesus said that it is good for nothing but to be "trampled underfoot."

    Jesus calls his disciples (and, perhaps, the crowds listening to the Sermon on the Mount), "the salt of the earth." He may be exhorting them to usefulness, or to fidelity, or referring to their role in purifying the world.

    In Roman times, salt was an important item of trade and was even used as money. Roman soldiers received part of their pay in salt[1]. "Salt of the Earth" may, in this context, refer to the listeners' value.

    The reference to his followers being "salted with fire" in Mark 9:49 may refer, in part, to the purifying effect of salt in Jewish liturgical use.

    In Colossians 4:6, Paul exhorts, "Let your speech always be gracious, seasoned with salt, so that you know how you should respond to each one."


    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Salt_in_the_Bible
     
  4. Chevron Dove

    Chevron Dove Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    This was absolutely amazing! I really enjoyed reading all three previous post. Wow! So, the covenant was given to David over salt! I just love this! Yes, David was awesome! Judah was awesome! . . . Jesus, the lion of the tribe of Judah!
     
  5. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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    You're very welcomed, Sister Chevron!


    And, you know, I can only agree with your praise of Him who is so worthy to be praised!
     
  6. Angela22

    Angela22 Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Praise be to the Father on High, and honor and glory to the Father and the Son. Sure faith is to be had in the One who came and died for us that our iniquity and sins may be cleansed and no more have us bound to death. Certain belief is to be held in the One who was resurrected from the dead on the 3rd day for our redemption that we might have salvation forever and always. He has certainly seasoned this world with Good News and glad tidings which will stand unto eternity, seeing as He has told us, His words will by no means pass away. So we have them forever, as we have the Father and the Son forever in faith and goodly works of the Only Begotten. Blessings!:)
     
  7. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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    The Salt Covenant

    THE SALT COVENANT
    The Salt Covenant is rich in spiritual symbolism, and so important that for those who can see, it is visually demonstrated by the salting of the Temple sacrifices, which was to perpetually remind the faithful of their solemn Covenant responsibility to the LORD (Num.18:19). The LORD instructed the Israelites that every sacrifice, including grain offerings, was to be seasoned with salt as a sign of their Covenant with HIM (Lev. 2:13, Ezek. 43:23-24). Even the Holy ingredients used for the incense offering were to have salt added. “You shall make of these an incense, a compound according to the art of the perfumer, salted, pure and holy” (Ex. 30:34-35).

    Salt represents purity, fidelity, and loyalty. Salt in the covenant meant that God’s people were to be pure and incorruptible in there covenant relationship with the LORD.
    http://www.johneckhardtministries.com/2013/02/the-salt-covenant/
     
  8. butterfly#1

    butterfly#1 going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Cherryblossom, what happen above? The print is so light, I can't read it.
     
  9. Gracious

    Gracious Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    The Salt Covenant

    THE SALT COVENANT
    The Salt Covenant is rich in spiritual symbolism, and so important that for those who can see, it is visually demonstrated by the salting of the Temple sacrifices, which was to perpetually remind the faithful of their solemn Covenant responsibility to the LORD (Num.18:19). The LORD instructed the Israelites that every sacrifice, including grain offerings, was to be seasoned with salt as a sign of their Covenant with HIM (Lev. 2:13, Ezek. 43:23-24). Even the Holy ingredients used for the incense offering were to have salt added. “You shall make of these an incense, a compound according to the art of the perfumer, salted, pure and holy” (Ex. 30:34-35).

    Salt represents purity, fidelity, and loyalty. Salt in the covenant meant that God’s people were to be pure and incorruptible in there covenant relationship with the LORD.

    http://www.johneckhardtministries.com/2013/02/the-salt-covenant/
     
  10. butterfly#1

    butterfly#1 going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Thanks Gracious!
     
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