Black History Culture : Rose Fortune

Discussion in 'Black History - Culture - Panafricanism' started by cherryblossom, Mar 13, 2012.

  1. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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    Rose Fortune (13 March 1774–20 February 1864) was an African American who came to Annapolis Royal, Nova Scotia with the Black Loyalists where she became a successful businesswoman and the first female police officer in Canada.

    Biography
    Rose Fortune was born into slavery in the British colony of Virginia. Her family escaped slavery during the American Revolution and settled in Annapolis Royal, Nova Scotia as part of the Black Loyalist migration when Rose was 10 years old.[1] In 1825, she started her own business, carting luggage between the ferry docks and nearby homes and hotels. She became entrusted with safeguarding property and maintaining order on the wharves and warehouses of Annapolis Royal, acting as the town's waterfront police officer. Rose Fortune died in 1864 in the small house she owned at the engineer's lot near Fort Anne. The business she founded was continued by her son in law Albert Lewis as the Lewis Transfer Company and continued for several generations remaining in business until 1980.[2] Rose Fortune was buried in Annapolis Royal in the Garrison Cemetery.[3] Her grave is unmarked but a plaque in the Petite Parc on the Annapolis Royal waterfront commemorates her life and contribution to Nova Scotian history.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rose_Fortune
     
  2. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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    Rose Fortune - a "privileged character"
    Rose Fortune was one of Annapolis Royal's most notable figures during the first half of the 19th century. A well-known image of her from a watercolour of about 1830 depicts her in middle age. Wearing men's boots, a man's overcoat over a dress and apron, and a straw hat on top of the lace cap tied under her chin, she carries a straw basket, and is every bit the picture of firm resolve. Some twenty years later, a Lieutenant-Colonel Sleigh of the 77th Regiment wrote of a chance encounter with Rose in 1852:
    "I was aided in my hasty efforts to quit the abominable inn by a curious old Negro woman, rather stunted in growth.... and dressed in a man's coat and felt hat; she had a small stick in her hand which she applied lustily to the backs of all who did not jump instantly out of the way. Poor old dame! She was evidently a privileged character."
    That strength of character elevated Rose to a special position within town. By the time her portrait was painted, Rose had carved for herself a role as a luggage carrier. Using a wheelbarrow, she made collections and deliveries between the town's busy wharves and hotels. She protected her business vigorously, and any boys attempting to infringe upon her monopoly were severely chastised. In the process, Rose became an unofficial policewoman, known for her ability in keeping the more unruly youngsters in order. She was on familiar terms with the leading citizens of town. In other words, she knew everybody!
    Born in Philadelphia
    A child during the American Revolution, Rose Fortune was born about 1774 in Philadelphia, reportedly to slaves belonging to a Devone family.
    Like thousands of other Blacks during the American Revolution, her parents presumably fled with her and crossed over to the British lines on the promise of their freedom. Rose does not appear by name in any of the extensive rolls of Blacks aboard ships leaving American ports at the conclusion of the war in 1783. She is, however, likely to be the only child aged 'over 10 years of parents "Fortune and wife", listed as "Free Negroes" in the muster roll taken at Annapolis Royal in June of 1783.
    Details of her early life in town are a mystery. Despite extensive documentation for a number of other Black Loyalists of her generation in St. Luke's Church of England records, there is no mention at all of her parents and the only record of Rose is her burial on Feb. 20, 1864, "age unknown, supposed about 90".....

    continued....http://annapolisheritagesociety.com/hinotablerose.htm
     
  3. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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