Black Poetry : Rightful Hero

Discussion in 'Black Poetry - Get Your Flow On!' started by candeesweet, Sep 24, 2017.

  1. candeesweet

    candeesweet going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Our Natur of ngr
    "N" being as sacred Heru
    Undertaking mother "N"
    For a type being forming
    As metaphors being our relations
    Of
    Already felt passages
    What goes around
    Comes around
    Telling perfection metaphorically
    Natur being called upon
    As above
    So below
    Rebellions Natur of meeting
    Underneath
    So to attach the middle
    All seeing eye
    Sword still audibly available
    Swung and Hung all over one night.
    Coincidently
    Legend, Karma, Figures
    Has us as
    Bones spread around the likes of Jerusalem Virginia
    ironically
    Being held as our heroic third eye viewing son's of slaves.

    *me two phor

    A SHARPENED SWORD
    During the rebellion, Nat Turner armed himself with a sword now held by the Southampton Historical Society. Turner was still carrying it when he was captured.

    nat-turner-sword-hilt.adapt.352.1.jpg
     
    Last edited: Sep 25, 2017
  2. candeesweet

    candeesweet going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    In February 1831, Nat witnessed a solar eclipse, which he interpreted as a sign from God to carry out his plan. It is rumored that Nat wanted to revolt on July 4th, likely inspired by his affirmative visions and the events of the American Revolution from just 55 years previous. Patrick Henry’s heroism and famous words “Give me liberty or give me death” were spoken by whites every year on the 4th of July, and overheard by the enslaved. Nat’s plan to organize an army for the 4th fell short, as sources say he became nervous and abandoned the plot at that time.

    nat-turner-cabin-pond.adapt.590.1.jpg
    MEETING PLACE Before launching their revolt, the rebels gathered at Cabin Pond to make plans. After the rebellion’s failure, these marshlands of Southampton County served as Nat Turner’s hiding place for two months before his capture.
    PHOTOGRAPH BY RADCLIFFE ROYE
    By August, however, his plan began to solidify, and in the night hours of August 21, 1831, Hark Moore, Henry Porter, Nelson Edwards, Sam Francis, Will Francis, and Jack Reese met in the woods, roasted a pig, drank brandy, and waited for Nat to arrive. Turner showed up: sober, determined, and courageous. They were to risk all they knew, all that they loved, to fight to end the institution of slavery as they knew it. Turner’s story is shared with the rebels who fought by his side, who all gave their life to try to gain freedom. These soldiers have descendants, too, and a legacy to be defined alongside Turner.
     
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