Black People : Report details challenges facing black women

Discussion in 'Black People Open Forum' started by oldsoul, Mar 5, 2008.

  1. OldSoul

    OldSoul Permanent Black Man PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Report details challenges facing black women
    despite successes of Winfrey, Obama
    March 5, 2008 BY ASSOCIATED PRESS

    NEW YORK---- This is a triumphant time for black women: Condoleezza Rice in the global diplomatic spotlight, Michelle Obama captivating campaign crowds as a potential first lady, billionaire Oprah Winfrey playing political kingmaker.
    It's also a traumatic time: Rutgers University basketball players disparaged by radio host Don Imus, a black woman kidnapped and tortured by whites in West Virginia, the home-owning dreams of black women disproportionately dashed by foreclosures.
    That remarkable mix is the focus of this year's State of Black America report, issued Wednesday by the National Urban League. It features essays looking at the array of challenges faced by African-American women: economic, social, psychological and medical.
    ''The one thing that is certain is the need to hear and amplify the voices of black women,'' longtime civil rights activist Dorothy Height writes in the foreword. ''Too often, our needs, concerns, struggles, and triumphs are diminished and subordinated to what is believed to be the more pressing concerns of others.''
    Julianne Malveaux, the president of Bennett College for Women in Greensboro, N.C., contends in the report's opening essay that the image of black women in popular culture has barely improved in the year since the Imus incident.
    White men continue to dominate on TV's Sunday morning news shows, she writes, while ''the gyrating, undulating image of African-American women in rap music videos and, by extension, on cable television is as prevalent as ever.''
    The report delves deeply into economics, noting that black women are more likely than white or Hispanic women to be running a household and raising children on their own. According to Malveaux, black women hold more jobs nationwide than black men, yet -- despite their breadwinner roles -- earn less on average, $566 a week compared to $629 for black men.
    In an essay about the home loan crisis, Andrea Harris, president of the North Carolina Institute for Minority Economic Development, suggests that black women have suffered disproportionately. Assessing recent federal data on subprime loans, which are a main culprit in the foreclosure epidemic, Harris says black women received far more of these loans in 2006 than white men.
    ''It is easy to imagine the devastation that is headed toward African-American women and their communities,'' Harris writes.
    An essay by Dr. Doris Browne, a public health expert, details the above-average rates of cancer, diabetes and heart disease among black women.
    On an upbeat note, former Labor Secretary Alexis Herman notes in her essay that black women are making huge strides as entrepreneurs. The number of businesses owned by them increased by 147 percent between 1997 and 2006, compared to an overall business growth rate of 24 percent, she wrote.
    Another of the essayists, Melanie Campbell of the National Coalition on Black Civic Participation, said in an interview that disparities in health care and economics are the paramount issues for black women as the election campaign unfolds.
    Exit polling shows that black women have become a larger force within the Democratic electorate compared to 2004, and Campbell said their expectations for policy changes also are rising.
    ''We want to go beyond being thought about,'' she said. ''We want action.''
    The president of the Urban League, a 98-year-old black empowerment organization, hailed women as ''the backbone of the black family'' -- constantly surmounting obstacles. Marc Morial called for expansion of programs that would assist black women in starting businesses, protect more of them from predatory lending schemes, and provide more of them with affordable, high-quality child care.
    ''When black women hurt, the American family suffers,'' Morial wrote. ''But by uplifting black women, especially those struggling hardest to keep their families together and their dreams on track, we lift up every American community.''
    A year ago, the Urban League focused its State of Black America report on the difficulties facing many young black men, including their high rates of crime and imprisonment. This year's theme was welcomed by black women who believe their particular concerns often are overlooked.
     
  2. truetothecause

    truetothecause Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    THANK YOU, THANK YOU, THANK YOU

    For Sharing This!!!

    :bowdown::bowdown::bowdown::bowdown:

     
  3. Josh Wickett

    Josh Wickett Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    "Report details challenges facing black women"

    Thanks for the info Oldsoul.

    I want to point out something I noticed about the title of this article. I think the word "challenges" needs to be replaced with the word "problems", and heres why:

    The word "challenge" implies CHOICE. The word PROBLEM means you are facing something you have no choice in addressing.

    Example:

    One on one against Micheal Jordan is a CHALLENGE.

    Why?

    Because you can DECIDE not to accept the challenge; and go on your merry way, ego intact...

    But if you have a cancerous tumor the size of a baseball on your neck; that ain't no challenge, because thats a PROBLEM.

    Nonwhite people need to tell ourselves the truth about our condition in the system of racism white supremacy.

    Nonwhite people have a lot of PROBLEMS. I know cause Im one of em.

    I have 5 sisters and none of them, I repeat, NONE OF THEM have a constructive, harmonious relationship with a male. I think this causes them much grief because now that Im older and know more about females, I understand the importance they place on "relationships.

    It took me a while to understand why females place such value on "PDOA" (public displays of affection). One time my girlfriend even told me about how all the "haters" at her office went into overdrive one day when one of the girls got flowers at work; they said all kinds of insulting things about her behind her back just because some guy sent her flowers at work.

    (((shakin my head)))


    One of the most effective ways to work against the white supremacists is to produce constructive, harmonious relationships between nonwhite males and nonwhite females; especially by helping them when they need help.

    Need help doing what?

    Need help SOLVING PROBLEMS!


    Josh
     
  4. truetothecause

    truetothecause Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    I have so much to say about this, I hardly know where to start. Also, you have made some other statements which I see as well, yet this one is extremly important.

    As I experience it....Racism/white supremacy IS a PROBLEM....and I have no choice...rather...to NOT address it creates more problems...for those coming after me.
    I could very well just "do me"...yet...Spiritually and Morally...that does not work....cause I AM connected to a Collective Spirit which wants to be Free

    That's all I can say for now.

    M.E.

    :hearts2:
     
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