Black People : Remembering the 1968 King Riots That Set DC On Fire (Footage in True HD)

Discussion in 'Black People Open Forum' started by KPITRL, Aug 29, 2014.

  1. KPITRL

    KPITRL Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    After watching news coverage of the Ferguson Riots resulting from the shooting death of Michael Brown, and after watching a scene from James Browns movie, "Get On Up" not too long before, where they showed television news footage of the historical 1968 14th Street King Riots in DC, I searched some youtube videos on the King Riots and found this particular peace of footage very moving. It's in HD format showing the aftermath of the riots. It gives a much clearer and more colorful image of how things looked during that time, more than I've seen since it happened.

    As some here may have already guessed by now, I was raised on 14th Street NW during my early childhood, and my old neighborhood got caught in the middle of all of this. Until I saw this youtube video the other day, I didn't think I would ever again see another image of that area the way it was when I was growing up. They made it look so live and colorful as if I was there yesterday. Over the years, when they use to show news coverage of the riots every anniversary, the footage would be in black and white, just like the images they showed in the James Brown movie. What's kind of strange is, I will probably never see an HD quality video of the suburban neighborhood we moved to, the newer neighborhood where I spent the other part of my childhood. Unfortunately, the only reason I can see my older neighborhood in HD is because Dr King was killed, and it made a time in history, and the riots happened in my old neighborhood.

    But on the other hand, a lot of the scenery in my old DC neighborhood is gone as the result of the riots. However I do have a chance now to see HD images of stores and some buildings I considered landmarks in my childhood, that are gone now as I said. On that note, there are two scenes in this video I will probably cherish. The first scene is our old Safeway grocery store on 14th Street. We lived directly across the street from it. Although it got ruined, this youtube video is the first time I've seen that grocery store since we moved, and it's in color and in HD. It moved me so much I had to call my older sister this morning and tell her about this video, since this was the Safeway she got caught stealing raisins from when we were kids...lol. The other scene is at the 10:33 seconds mark. You'll see a tall dark brown brick building on the corner with a steeple on top. This building was located at the bottom of the street of where we lived. Whenever we were driving down 14th Street and I saw that building, I new we were near home. It used to have this big colorful clock not far below the steeple that used to light up at night. My sister told me that building was a flower shop, but I'm not sure about that. Unfortunately, the other tall building across from it, which was the white tall building with a steeple, was where I saw my first dead body. He was laying not too far from the curb. They say he had been shot. Really all I heard was, "Dead man down the street". I assumed he was shot because he had his hand on his heart. It took me years to realize he wasn't really wearing a maroon shirt. It was a shirt covered in blood. Both of these buildings are gone now. To me, tearing down the tall dark brown building with the clock below the steeple, was almost like taking away the Statue of Liberty from a New Yorker. Just looking at some of the scenes from I guess the helicopters looking over the city, remind me very much of the view I used to see when I would sometimes go to our 6th floor hallway window and stare out of it. After all these years, it almost felt like I was looking out that same window again when I viewed that part of the video.

    Anyway, here's the 18:34 seconds video. By the way the video doesn't have any sound, which takes away even more from the feeling of being there. However the HD images of these older personal cars, police-cars, patty-wagons, and fire-trucks will take you back. These colorful images are rarely scene, not only from the King Riots, but from the 60's period.

    I would turn my old buddy on to this youtube video, but I'm scared he may tell me again that I need too prove to myself I can live around all black people. Okay, I'll leave him alone.

     
    Last edited: Apr 10, 2015
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  2. KPITRL

    KPITRL Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Not to be beating a dead horse, and not to stray too far off the focus of this historical riot that hasn't occupied an American city as much since the Civil War, I thought about the hairstyles the brothers were wearing in the video during that time. We all know the time was April 1968.

    I remember a heated debate I had on another site with some young female about the bush or afro, the two names that were used interchangeably for the hairstyle. She claimed that most brothers began wearing it in the mid-60's, and that it was introduced by the Black Panthers. Some members of the Panther Party may have wore it back then, but they definitely weren't the ones who made it go mainstream with Black America. Anyway, she was very disrespectful during this debate, which probably lasted a few days. I kept telling her, just like I've said before on this site, that Micheal Jackson and his brothers were the ones who brought the bush to mainstream Black America after their 1969 Ed Sullivan debut, when they introduced the song, "I Want You Back". I even posted the you tube video. I also made it clear that I was there and I even wore the hairstyle myself.

    After viewing this video of the 14th Street King Riots, right in the middle of where I was raised, which was also across the street from Malcolm X Park, which ran off of 15th NW, plus this being an area that Huey P. Newton and Angela Davis and other Panther Party members were very familiar with, it's obvious that I would have a better ideal of what black people were doing during this time than she would, who wasn't even born yet. Secondly, it's clear that most brothers weren't wearing a Michael Jackson bush in this 1968 video. You'd be lucky to find one or two.

    Anyway, come to find out this young woman was only in her mid 30's, and she was relying on research, that still couldn't counter what I was telling her. The only thing we agreed on was they did call the hair-style the bush and the afro. But we didn't even agree on that really. She just didn't take her argument that far, but she took it far enough. I'm sure she was just trying to give me a hard way to go, probably because I said something in that thread that rubbed her the wrong way while replying to somebody else. But regardless, if it wasn't said directly to her, she shouldn't had carried it that far, trying to tell a grown black man black history he lived, while she wasn't even born. She even went as far as asking her mother questions to negate things that I was telling her, who probably couldn't precisely remember some of the things I was saying without a little research herself. Then she couldn't even put together what her mother told her. That was one disturbed chick.

    What happened to the day when we respected the older brother who was there when you weren't. I mean how do a younger person look trying to tell an older brother he didn't know what was happening during a historical time, say for example the murder of Emitt Till, especially when the older person remembers it, even lived up the street from that river where the body was found, meanwhile the younger person wasn't even born yet. It makes that younger person look even worst after the older person already backed up what he was saying with videos, etc... I guess some will continue learning the hard-way.
     
    Last edited: Apr 4, 2015
  3. KPITRL

    KPITRL Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated 47 years ago today. I thought I'd bump this thread that I started about those Dr. King riots in 1968. As some of you may remember, I started this thread during the Ferguson riots last summer. They did a three hour interview on the Carl Nelson show yesterday morning in remembrance of the assassination, asking where were you the moment you heard Dr. King was shot. Viewing this thread, most of you know where I was. But at the moment I heard the news, I was watching Bewitched that evening along with my mother, sister, and brother. I'd say it was between 7:30pm and 8:00pm, and it had just turned dark not long ago. They interrupted the program to bring in a special news bulletin with someone, perhaps Walter Concrite announcing Dr. King Jr. had been shot. I remember my mother becoming very upset out of disbelief. As she began turning through the channels, they also began announcing that Dr. King had been shot to death. To this day I still remember those words, "Dr. King Shot to Death".

    Yesterday morning Carl Nelson had one of the best shows I've heard in a while, even though most of his shows are pretty good. I'm sure they'll be playing repeats this weekend for those who didn't catched it. He had Ray Fauntroy on as his guest, who is the brother of Former D.C. Congressman Walter Fauntroy, who was the head of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference headquarters in D.C. at the time, and who was with Dr.King when Lyndon Johnson signed the Voting Rights Act in 1964. I still have a photo of Walter Fauntroy speaking at a protest, with me standing almost directly behind him holding a banner. Ray Fauntroy discussed how those D.C. riots began at 14th and U Street NW not far from the SCLC headquarters later that evening after they heard about the shooting, and how it exploded into fires and cars turning over. They didn't clean up that area for over a decade or two, leaving my old neighborhood looking like Beirut through the 70's. But Fauntroy didn't just remember the 14th St riots, he remembered riots throughout the whole city. By the way he did reaffirm us that his brother Walter Fauntroy, after not being heard from in a while, is doing fine living in Africa. He told us that America isn't a safe place for Black leaders to live today, which seems to make more and more sense.

    That interview didn't focus too long on the riots that took place across all America, but on things that happened when Dr. King was killed that evening in Memphis and after, and who was around him during that time, and the roles they played. Carl Nelson later brought in Dr. Barbara Reynolds, who picked up where Ray Fauntroy left off, and took it to an even higher level that left Carl Nelson saying he hopes he doesn't get a door knock from the Secret Service. She talked about something that was being discussed about Jessie Jackson Sr. on this very same WOL radio station, however I forgot whose show it was. I remember the show was on September 10, 2001, back when most Black Talk Show host were warriors, although they only lasted an average of 5 years per station. They were talking about how Jessie Jackson was able to get on a plane after Dr. King had been shot that evening, leave Memphis and fly to Chicago even though all flights leaving the city were banned, and take over duties that were supposed to be left over to David Ralph Abernathy who Dr. King appointed (and someone else Dr. King appointed, but I can't recall their name right now). That topic was suppose to continue that following day, but 911 happened. I don't think 911 had anything to do with that previous broadcast on WOL, but it was still one heck of a coincidence. Anyway Barbara Reynolds spoke on this thing with Jessie Jackson yesterday. I believe I heard Dick Gregory speak on it too before since that interview broadcasted in 2001. She talked about other things I heard Dick Gregory speak on, including the mysterious death of Ron Brown. In fact, in addition to recognizing the 47th anniversary of Dr. Kings assassination, the WOL radio station will recognize today, April 4th, as a day to remember all the Black martyrs who lost their lives or somehow lost their careers fighting for Black people, and believe me there are names we never even heard of. One of the biggest topics that they discussed on the program yesterday was the civil trial in Memphis, Tennessee in 1999 to determine who Killed Dr. King, and how it got hardly no media coverage, even when the jury decided James Earl Ray didn't murder Dr. King, and aimed it towards a conspiracy. There's a lot more to this story, but it's probably better that you hear the interview. Carl Nelson called this a historic interview...that's how heavy it got.
     
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  4. chuck

    chuck Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Have you ever seen and/or do remember a movie called HEATWAVE?

    It was and is about what me and mine call the L. A. /Watts Rebellion (not 'riots') of 1966...

    Yes, I also do give you credit for trying to heed the reality checks etc. of elders who actually were around when suchlike took place, but some things are better found up on your own, too...

    I wouldn't even know if there remains any film footage online about the two Urban Rebellions which took place in Detroit,
    and more than 150 took place when King, Jr. was taken from us, not just in D. C.

    FYI
     
  5. IFE

    IFE Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    :eek: DEAD @ Micheal Jackson and his brothers were the ones who brought the bush to mainstream Black America after their 1969 Ed Sullivan debut, when they introduced the song, "I Want You Back".

    No. My people were wearing an Afro while watching Michael Jackson and the Jackson Five on the Ed Sullivan Show. They were the Jackson Five at that time. If I'm reading correctly you're saying Michael Jackson wore the Afro before Angela Davis, the Black Panthers, and a host of other black folk.
     
  6. IFE

    IFE Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    The afro is a hairstyle also known as a "fro" or the "natural," generally worn by people with curly hair. The afro gained much of its popularity in the 1960's, however, its roots date back all the way to the 1700's.

    On December 14, 1969 The Ed Sullivan Show introduced the country to Michael Jackson and the rest of The Jackson 5.

    The Afro was popular at least 10 years prior to the Jackson Five. Of course it could depend on where you lived. I'm Midwest born. Not known for creating trends, but the Afro was in style in 1960. I was wearing mine. Trying to look like Angela Davis.
     
  7. KPITRL

    KPITRL Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    I didn't want this post to be about the afro, plus I didn't feel like going through this again with somebody else. Get a chance, do a search on my thread, "The Truth about the Afro (The Bush)". There's enough history there about the afro and some.

    As for Michael Jackson, I didn't say he wore the afro before the Black Panthers, Angela Davis, etc... Basically I'm almost saying the same thing you're saying, but I still say the Jackson Five made the style go mainstream through the Ed Sullivan Show. When I say popular, I'm mean with the old and young across the whole country, and all black people, not just the blacks who emulated the Panthers, or Angela Davis. Men wore the bush across the country because Michael Jackson made it popular and the girls loved it. We even called the afro the MJ sometimes during the later 70's. It appeared that made the girls pick up on were Angela Davis left off, and caused the hairstyle to go coast to coast for the females as well during the 70's, and not just in certain areas of the midwest. Most of this is in my thread, "The Truth about the Afro (The Bush)", except it being worn in the the mid-west in the early 60's...but again I may have included that. However Angela Davis, nor the Black Panther Party could have made the afro go mainstream because the government was at war with the Black Panthers successfully turning them against each other through cointelpro. I've met guys who got high with Huey Newton. They told me the Panthers had a reputation of even killing white children. I tried to tell them it was cointelpro, but they wouldn't listen, nor even knew what cointelpro was. This was in the early 90's. However today they might believe me.

    You are the first person I ever heard say they wore the afro in 1960, so perhaps you were there when it started...the Jackson Five are from the mid-west. But I never heard or seen any popular singing groups wearing an afro in 1960, or hardly the 60's at all, nor heard of anyone wearing one in my family back then, and I have first cousins older than Angela Davis. Perhaps it was popular in certain parts of the mid-west like you said, like those Soul Train dances were probably popular there too, but never quite picked up over here other than the robot.

    Nonetheless, I'm not saying the afro wasn't popular no where at all, as I said, the Jackson Five had to get it from somewhere. But nobody got the afro to go nationwide like Michael and the Jackson Five did through the Ed Sullivan Show...that was my point, and there's no way around that. It may be better to say that Michael Jackson made the hair style started by the Panthers and other members of the Black power movement go nationwide through the Ed Sullivan Show, however I didn't think I needed to spell it out like that. But still you supplied some very interesting information.
     
    Last edited: Apr 8, 2015
  8. chuck

    chuck Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    One might attribute the popularity to any number of mainstream sources, be it past teen shows, up to SOUL TRAIN, but Panther mainstay brother Cleaver gave big props to what he associated with its originator, as in to brother Malcolm X, way back when he returned from his life changing journey to Mecca, hence the image associated with the black conscious folk of the late sixties/early seventies, etc.

    Cleaver brought that up by the way of a BLACK SCHOLAR article...

    FYI
     
  9. IFE

    IFE Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    This could be a matter of age difference. When the Jackson Five appeared on Ed Sullivan I was a teen.

    As the Jackson 5, Michael Jackson and his brothers "became a cutting-edge example of black crossover artists," said Mark Anthony Neal, a professor of black popular culture at Duke University's Department of African and African American Studies.

    "You basically had five working-class black boys with Afros and bell bottoms, and they really didn't have to trade any of that stuff in order to become mainstream stars," Neal said.

    The Jackson came on the set already wearing an Afro.

    Somet things you may have to research and some you just know. I know about hairstyles, cause I'm a woman. I know about the Afro cause I was sporting one before 1969.

    Again, I think this could be age difference thing. Maybe Michael Jackson introduced a generation of Black youth to a hairstyle that is still popular today. It's about the curl, the kink, the nappy. Those words are music to my ears. Natural. Afro.

    Peace.
     
  10. KPITRL

    KPITRL Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    It's beginning to sound a little like you want to find a reason to say you're older and knew something I didn't. You can add to what I said, but you're not going to take away from anything I said about the impact Michael Jackson and the Jackson Five had on the Afro in this country. His impact sent the afro coast to coast. I already gave credit to the Panthers and Angela Davis as the originators of the afro, and I tried to agree with most of what you said as far as females (and I guess males too) wearing the hairstyle in the midwest or your part of the country. However the video I posted of the 1968 Dr. King Riots in the middle of my old neighborhood indicates that the Afro didn't reach D.C. (Chocolate City) because I saw neither male or female sporting one in that video, just like I remembered when I was living there, therefore it hadn't yet went coast to coast in 1968...and most of the people in that video were probably either your age or older. I hope you're not trying to say that every Black city in the U.S., and including the South, was already wearing the afro during this time except D.C. Why you're trying to argue this I don't know, but perhaps we should just agree to disagree on this one too.

    By the way, the reason I made that thread on the Afro in the first place was to reminisce with some of the old timers about the extremes we use to go through to keep the Afro, not for a shootout on who knew most about the hairstyle, like that former member tried to turn that thread in to.
     
    Last edited: Apr 9, 2015
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