Black People : Remember When Black People ...

Discussion in 'Black People Open Forum' started by Destee, May 16, 2009.

  1. Destee

    Destee destee.com STAFF

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    Peace and Blessings Family,

    Do you remember when Black People couldn't do this or couldn't do that?

    Or for that matter, had to do this, and had to do that?

    As time passes, there are fewer and fewer of Our People available to pass on these stories first hand. Sharing their personal experiences with the way we were (and may still be) treated differently by the dominating culture.

    Sister CherryBlossom inspired this thread, with her post below from a different thread. Reading it was like wiping the dust off my memories. I don't have any recollection of visiting the restaurant "Sambo's" but i surely remember the name! As she described the lawn jockeys and stuff, i could see it coming back to my mind.

    I believe that is part of their hope, and reality, pushing the atrocities out of our conscious mind. Replacing them (bombarding our children's minds) with images and talk of multi-culturalism, mutts, and such, as if everything was always made for love. But it was not, and i don't believe it is now.

    I think our sharing these personal experiences with each other and our children, who may be reading, is a great thing to do. Let's record and save the memories, for once the story-teller is gone, far too often, the story leaves with them ... instead of being passed on.



    Again Sister CherryBlossom, thank you so much for sharing this, inspiring this thread!

    I have no memory of not being able to eat anywhere. I really didn't know that the Waffle House and IHOP had a time in their existence, that they didn't serve Black People! I think i have no memories of such establishments, because we were poor growing up, and eating out was not something we did very often. If we did do it, i'm sure my Mother knew in advance, where to take us to enjoy that rare splurge in her Family's life. So no, i never really saw any of this, but it moves my Spirit, reading about it.

    We are blessed to have Elders amongst us, that can share their personal memories, as well as our Youth, that can attest to what may still be going on.

    I'm excited! Let's Share Family ... :grouphug:

    Love You!

    :heart:

    Destee
     
  2. Destee

    Destee destee.com STAFF

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    I remember a liquor store / tavern named Alby's in Springfield, IL, that did not serve Black People inside.

    It was on the edge of the "old projects" in Springfield, catering primarily to a Black community, yet only white people could be served inside.

    Black People had to go to the drive-up / walk-up window to purchase anything.

    Oh my gosh, this was YEARS ago! :look: ... but i was scouring my mind, looking for experiences i could share in this thread.

    Yep ... it was me, my Family, the Projects, and a liquor store right outside the projects.

    I'm sure it's torn down now, as even the "old projects" (John Hays Homes) have been demolished.

    :heart:

    Destee
     
  3. roarin1

    roarin1 Banned MEMBER

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    Flesh and Blood will die....

    .......but the truth, should WE seek to embrace it, will always live on.
     
  4. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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    Well, I'm glad to have sparked your memory, Destee.

    Actually, all over the South, there weren't many restaurants Blacks could stop and "dine-in." I'm talking about after Integration. Yes, "LEGALLY" we could eat at these restaurants, but you sure weren't welcomed there. When Black people would walk in the door, the White customers would start saying stuff like "It sure is gettin' mighty DARK in here!"

    And Black people didn't want some nasty White waitress spitting in your food. So, we just didn't go to these places for a long time.

    For a long time, the Waffle House was really just a hang-out for local Rednecks and White truck drivers. It was more like a Truck Stop than a regular restaurant. So, Black folks didn't wanna go in there anyway.

    In the South, we also remember the restaurant "Shoney's" and "Big Boy's." And Black people didn't eat at those places either for a long while.

    I, too, grew up poor. So, like you, there wasn't a whole lotta splurging on eating out. And when Black people used to travel with food, it wasn't always only because we couldn't afford to eat at a restaurant but because you couldn't stop just anywhere TO eat. So, Black mamas cooked some fried chicken and other stuff and put a ice-chest with some sodas in it in the car, and you hit the road! lol

    (Remember when you could stop on the side of the highway and buy a bag of Boiled Peanuts or Peanut Brittle? You don't see that much any more either.)

    And when Black women worked as day Domestics in White folks houses, the White women of the house used to actually count their Silverware and mark their liquor decanters on the bar cuz they thought the Black maids might be stealing and drinking.

    Well, sorry for the long reply; but you got my memory to rollin' too! lol

    Yeah, it's a whole lot our youth don't know (and some grown folks too!)

    They don't get these stories in school and if we don't tell them, it's our fault for their ignorance.
     
  5. Clyde C Coger Jr

    Clyde C Coger Jr going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    In the Spirit of Sankofa and the Truth!




    Destee and cherryblossom,

    This is an excellent thread topic and both of you have stirred up long term memories, for real. However, I must add that this is the reason why I fight so hard for my people to come together and leave a brand new legacy, thank you my sister friends.


     
  6. Bootzey

    Bootzey Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    I personally have never been denied patronage to any establishment, but my parents have stories that they have shared with the children. It's important that we remember this, because as soon we forget it will happen again.
     
  7. Clyde C Coger Jr

    Clyde C Coger Jr going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    In the Spirit of Sankofa and the Truth!




    Bootzey,
    :bowdown::bowdown::bowdown:

    And that is the Ghana/Akan significance of the Sankofa Bird, for real.

     
  8. LadyLC

    LadyLC Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    I have no memory of not being able to eat anywhere I wanted to. My parents educated us on the civil rights struggle. I would ask my grandparents question about "those days" but they didn't always want to talk about it.

    I do remember an incident in the 80's at a local Dairy Queen. We had just moved to a suburb that was mostly white. Matter of fact we were the third black family on our street. My mother ordered food from the Dairy Queen and the man was racist. We had to wait forever for our food to come and I think our food was just thrown together when we finally got it. I was 9 or 10 at the time but I remember that my mother was angry about this and we never ate there again. I still live near that Dairy Queen and I still don't eat there.

    I still blows my mind sometimes that there are things that my grandparents were not allowed to do when they were my age. But they held their head high and went on with life. I often wonder how many in my generation would act if those things we take for granted were taken from us and we had to live as my grandparents/parents had to live in the 50's......
     
  9. Bootzey

    Bootzey Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    When I was in Dental School, I had an adjuct pre-clinic instructor that refused to work with me. I'm not the kind of Black person to scream racism at every turn. So I didn't recognize right away why he refused to work with me. When he'd work with other folks. White folks. There were only 4 Black people in my class. Fianlly one day after waiting longer than I should to get him to sign something off, He told me my work was shoddy (probably was, I didn't have any help from my assigned adjunct). He said and I remember clearly 17 years later to quote it... "This is an easy concept. If you can't get it maybe you should leave this school right now. After all you are on scholarship." I looked into his blue eyes and said, "You're right; but I think I'll stay. If I leave it's not like anyone you know would benefit from the scholarship. It is a minority scholarship after all." I walked over to the head of the class and asked with a determined look to work with him and not my assigned adjunct. He acquiesced.

    Dental school was like being hazed in a racist nightmare. It ain't over. And even this generation has it's obstacles. Until they are taken off the planet we have to be on alert for this devilishness.


    Peace

    PS: I graduated. I had to because I had something to proove.
     
  10. Kemetstry

    Kemetstry going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    :censored:


    I'd prefer not to remember. I would prefer that it never happened. I would hope that my son never has to go thru it



    :11900:















     
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