Beauty - Hair Care - Fashion : Regulating Braids and Cornrows...

Discussion in 'Beauty - Black Hair Care - Fashion' started by Aqil, Apr 14, 2005.

  1. Aqil

    Aqil Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Every once in a while, people in Washington have a good idea. A really good idea. An idea that creates jobs and provides a service people like. Then the government gets involved.

    Some years ago, a married couple, Taalib-Din Uqdah and Pamela Farrell, went into business braiding hair, African-style. They called their shop Cornrows & Co. If politicians' speeches are right, Uqdah and Farrell were heroes: Inner cities need businesses, and the couple had built a booming business in Washington, D.C. They had 20,000 customers, employed 10 people, and took in half a million dollars a year. Some women came from as far away as Connecticut, six hours away, to have their hair braided by Cornrows & Co.

    Did the politicians honor these entrepreneurs for contributing to the community? Find ways to encourage others to do similar things? Well, the government did respond. But it wasn't with encouragement. Local bureaucrats ordered Uqdah to cease and desist, or be "subject to criminal prosecution." Why? Because he didn't have a license. "It's a safety issue," said the regulators. Those who run a hair salon must have a cosmetology license. The chemicals they use dyeing or perming hair might hurt someone.

    Hair dye is hardly a serious safety threat, but even if it were, Cornrows & Co. didn't dye or perm hair. They only braided it. That didn't matter, said the Cosmetology Board - they still had to get a license. In order to get one, Uqdah would have to pay about $5,000 to take more than 1,000 hours of courses at a beauty school.

    It's unclear what beauty school would have taught him. Beauty schools didn't even teach the service Cornrows & Co. provided. They taught things like pin curls and gelatinized hairstyles that hadn't been popular for 40 years. One rule required students to spend 125 hours studying shampooing. I didn't realize it was that complicated - have I been doing it wrong all these years?

    Uqdah says the braiding he provides can't be taught in schools and shouldn't be licensed. "I've watched little second-grade girls sit down and braid each other's hair." He says there's evidence of hair-braiding in Africa going back 5,000 years. "You cannot license a culture." He says the licensing test is weighted heavily toward the needs of straight or chemically straightened hair, not the kinky hair many Blacks have. When he argues that different hair requires different skills, he says, licensed cosmetologists "go into denial. They like to think that they know how to do it all. And they don't."

    Uqdah thought he understood why the cosmetology board wanted to shut down his salon: "Money - other salons don't like the competition." I think he was right. Even if licensing boards intend to protect the public, in time they are captured by the people who care most. Who cares most? Not consumers - you don't get your hair done that often, and even if you did, you don't care enough about it to want to join a regulatory bureaucracy. Innovators don't join the boards; they're busy innovating. Scientists, economists, doctors, and others with genuine expertise in safety and commerce don't join the boards, either. They're busy doing more important things. So boards are usually captured by the licensees, the established businesses. William Jackson, a former member of the Washington, D.C., Cosmetology Board, admitted, "The board, 90% of the time, are salon owners."

    Uqdah refused to close his shop. He fought the government instead, ultimately going to federal court with the help of the Institute for Justice, a libertarian law firm, and D.C. changed its law. Now, hair braiders don't have to get training that has nothing to do with what they do. Uqdah says, "I had to spend 10 years fighting the city. And now I've gone out and created a mechanism that other people can do what I've done - with or without a license."

    He and those others are fortunate that the Institute for Justice took his case. Usually, the established businesses get away with using licensing boards and "safety" regulations to crush competitors. That's unfair. And if the question is who's protecting the public, it seems to me Taalib-Din Uqdah has done much more than the bureaucrats who wanted him to spend 125 hours studying shampooing...

    http://www.townhall.com/columnists/GuestColumns/Stossel20050406.shtml
     
  2. karmashines

    karmashines Banned MEMBER

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    He doesn't have to use the techniques taught to him in beauty school on his client's hair. He can just get the license to get the government off of his back.
     
  3. Isaiah

    Isaiah Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Great, feel-good, tribulation to triumph kinda story. brother Aqil...

    Only reason why I believe brother should be licensed is in the case of the consumer... If he doesn't do a good job on someone, or someone just wants to consult the better business bureau for the best at Braiding, it's actually good to be a licensed practioner in your chosen field... It just kinda gives ya reputation some legitimacy with most folks...

    I'm glad he fought and won his case, as he is right, Cornrowing comes from the African spirit, our cultural creativity... We don't need no **** government to legitimize that... On that, I praise brother to the high heavens...

    Peace!
    Isaiah
     
  4. Khasm13

    Khasm13 STAFF STAFF

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    tru justice prevails for once....
    great story that i was not aware of aqil....

    one love
    khasm
     
  5. AHMOSE

    AHMOSE Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Thanks for sharing bruh.
     
  6. Aqil

    Aqil Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    You're welcome all...
     
  7. Aqil

    Aqil Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    African-American Women in High Hair Demand in the Salon Industry

    WATERBURY, CT - You could call Gloria Clemon-Vance the "Queen Latifah" of Waterbury's African-American hair salon community. The Waterbury native has been running her own hair salon in Waterbury for 16 years, relaxing hair, weaving, waving - and sharing all sorts of secrets and laughs with her customers. "There are a lot of people who come for the socialization," says Clemon-Vance, owner of Cut-N-Up on Chase Avenue. "To do this job, you must be a good listener. You must have sharp ears, because you're a sounding board. You're that person you can vent to." As a result, says the 49-year-old, "Nothing shocks me today. Nothing."

    Clemon-Vance giggles. Already this morning her shop is filling with customers who swap gossip and humor over the sounds of Judge Joe Brown on television. Cut-N-Up is a lot like the salon depicted in the film "Beauty Shop," a celebration of the free-flowing exchanges and culture particular to salons patronized mostly by African-American women.

    In the U.S., Black female salon owners are among the most successful entrepreneurs in their communities. And no wonder, considering how much money African-American women spend on hair care and beauty needs. African-Americans spend an estimated $5.7 billion a year in the beauty and barber industry, and Black women visit the salon an average of 2.5 times a month, data from the research firm Business Trend Analysts Inc./The Leading Edge Group, of Commack, NY show.

    And in an industry dominated by women, African-Americans make up 16% of professionals in the nation's hair, nail and skin care salons, according to the National Accrediting Commission of Cosmetology Arts and Sciences in Alexandria, VA. "The majority of these stylists make more money than white-collar workers," said Terri Winston, CEO and publisher of Chicago-based Salon Sense magazine, a trade publication. "You have more Black women owning beauty salons now. The (loans and financing) are more rapidly available than they were 20 years ago."

    Clemon-Vance always wanted to be a business owner, in part because her father, a welder, had his own business. "I always wanted to be an entrepreneur," she says. And she had plenty of role models. They include two teachers at her high school who paid particular attention to Clemon-Vance after her mother died of an aneurysm when the hairstylist was only 13, and Carolyn Washington, a hairstylist under whom Clemon-Vance worked when she was just starting out in her early 20s. "She gave me my start," said Clemon-Vance, who worked at Mr. Dan's with Washington before moving to Burton Street and taking charge of her own business."I needed to watch somebody who knew the trade, who had mastered the trade. I needed someone to watch, to observe," she said. For Clemon-Vance, Washington was it.

    Black women's success in the beauty business began in the early 1900s with beauty mogul Madame C.J. Walker, who became the first Black female millionaire. She produced and distributed a line of hair and beauty products for Black women, and trained hair "culturists," who are commonly known as stylists today. "It was lucrative - especially during the Jim Crow era when most African-American women were in domestic work or industries that didn't pay much," said Tiffany Gill, an assistant professor of history at the University of Texas at Austin. Gill wrote her doctorate dissertation on political activism among Black female salon owners. "It provided independence. They were able to take risks because they knew they wouldn't lose their jobs for taking a stance," Gill said.

    Today, many Black hair stylists start out either by renting booth space or working on a commission basis in a salon. In "Beauty Shop," Queen Latifah plays "Gina Norris," a hair stylist who quits her job at an upscale salon and reopens a rundown shop in a predominantly Black community.

    Most black-owned beauty salons still are located in predominantly Black neighborhoods. Even small storefront shops are known for having long waits to get to the shampoo bowl, but typically charge less than salons in pricier metropolitan areas, where proprietors can earn from $100,000 to $300,000 a year. "In metro areas, one client could walk in and pay anywhere from $100 to $150 for a service. If they're seeing 20 clients a day, 100 minimum a week, that's very lucrative," said Winston, who estimates she personally spends between $10,000 and $12,000 a year on hair, nail and spa services.

    Clemon-Vance, whose two daughters, Ashley and Taloria, study or practice the trade, says newer techniques, like braiding, have cut into her business somewhat. But she says she still enjoys the trade and is proud to call herself a business owner, just as her father did. "I will always do hair, because I enjoy my job every day," said Clemon-Vance, who, like her husband Russell, is engaged in church ministry. "It's always something different."

    African-Americans make up 16% of professionals in the nation's hair, nail and skin care salons, according to the National Accrediting Commission of Cosmetology Arts and Sciences in Alexandria, VA.
     
  8. Destee

    Destee destee.com STAFF

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    Peace and Blessings Family,

    I found this video where young Sisters are talking about how they make their living from braiding hair.

    Doin' Da Do's


    :heart:

    Destee
     
  9. Destee

    Destee destee.com STAFF

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    This is in the news again ... :look:

    Braiding African American hair at center of overregulation battle in Oregon

    Published: Saturday, August 11, 2012, 3:00 PM Updated: Monday, August 13, 2012, 9:07 AM


    In the 1950s, one out of every 20 U.S. jobs required a state license. Since then, our economy has evolved from one based on manufacturing to one dominated by service professions. Today, almost 1 in 3 American occupations requires a license.

    Traditional African braiding -- the art of weaving hair into tight snakelike rows, often with extensions or beads -- has become a common battle ground in the war over occupational licensing. Braiding is a skill many women of color learn as children and offers easy entry into the business world because so few tools are required. Braiders don't use chemicals, heat or scissors.

    Yet many states require braiders to earn a cosmetology license. In Oregon, that means spending up to 1,700 hours in beauty school, where tuition can run anywhere from $10,000 to $20,000.

    Click Here To Read Entire Article

    :heart:

    Destee
     
  10. Destee

    Destee destee.com STAFF

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    required to pay $10,000 to $20,000 for TUITION to braid hair?!

    c'mon now ... :censored:

    :heart:

    Destee
     
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