Black History Culture : Rebellious Slaves......

Discussion in 'Black History - Culture - Panafricanism' started by info-moetry, Feb 10, 2012.

  1. info-moetry

    info-moetry STAFF STAFF

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    READ CAREFULLY!!

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  2. info-moetry

    info-moetry STAFF STAFF

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  3. info-moetry

    info-moetry STAFF STAFF

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  4. info-moetry

    info-moetry STAFF STAFF

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    "Osman." 1856. David Hunter Strother, an artist for Harper's Magazine, captured the alarm and determination of this runaway slave in the Dismal Swamp of North Carolina. Strother remarked: "I had long nurtured a wish to see one of those sable outlaws who dwell in the fastnesses of the Swamp ... [Osman's] hair and beard were tipped with gray, and his purely African features were cast in a mould betokening, in the highest degree, strength and energy. The expression of the face was mingled fear and ferocity, and every moment betrayed a life of habitual caution and watchfulness." The dense vegetation and marshy land made the swamps a difficult place for masters and bounty hunters to search for runaway slaves, for the same reasons it was also difficult for slaves to survive these treacherous parts for long periods. Notice that Osman is holding a musket, how common do you think it was for runaways to have weapons like this for protection? Mariners' Museum.

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  5. info-moetry

    info-moetry STAFF STAFF

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    "Escaping Child in Trunk." This enslaved child escaped from his master, hidden in a trunk with the aid of a conductor on the Underground Railroad. His journey probably took days to reach freedom. Just how long he was shut away in the total darkness of this small trunk is unknown. How old to you think this boy is? How did he prepare for this trip? Did he have food to eat and water to drink? Will he know anyone when he arrives in a northern free state? What happened to runaway slaves if they were caught? William Still. The Underground Railroad: A Record of Facts, Authentic Narratives, Letters, & etc. Philadelphia: Porter & Coates, 1872. Mariners’ Museum.

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    Josiah Henson." (1789-1883) Henson escaped as a fugitive slave from Maryland in 1830, to Canada on the Underground Railroad. By 1841, Reverend Henson revealed his skills as an abolitionist, conductor on the Underground Railroad, and businessman when he organized with others to purchase 400 acres of land near Dresden, Ontario. This became the Dawn Settlement where the British American Institute for fugitive slaves was located, the first vocational training school for blacks in North America. Henson's work as a conductor on the Underground Railroad brought at least 118 enslaved to freedom. Harriet Beecher Stowe credits Henson's autobiography, written in 1849, as inspiration for the "Uncle Tom" character in her book, Uncle Tom's Cabin. Today the "Uncle Tom" label is often used as a derogatory reference that Henson's great-granddaughter, Barbara Carter, argues was a result of minstrel shows in the late 19th century misusing the term as a racial slur. Josiah Henson, pictured here with his wife, appears dignified and of middle-class wealth. Obviously it was dangerous for Henson leave the safety of his home and freedom in Canada to travel south in order to guide other enslaved men and women to freedom? What dangers awaited him as he helped others escape from slavery? What do you think motivated Henson to take these risks? Ohio Historical Society.
     
  6. info-moetry

    info-moetry STAFF STAFF

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    Ripley Trail." This photograph shows an ex-slave near the banks of the Ohio River, where many fugitive slaves crossed over from Kentucky into the free state. The Ripley Trail led them through the woods to the safe harbor of John Rankin's home, a station on the Underground Railroad that provided food and shelter to over 2000 runaway slaves. How do you think fugitive slaves found their way to this trail and John Rankin's home? Runaway slaves often traveled at night. Do you think it would be easy to find your way to freedom in the dark? Ohio Historical Society.


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    "Aunt Polly Jackson." Polly Jackson was a key figure in the Underground Railroad movement and is listed today on a local monument dedicated to her and others who risked their lives to help free the enslaved. According to legend, as a fugitive herself, Jackson fought off bounty hunters with a butcher knife and Kettle of boiling water. :) Jackson joined a community of free blacks in the settlement of Africa, Ohio, that was established near Ripley. Many of the local black residents served as conductors on the Railroad. The look of determination on Polly Jackson’s face reveals her resolve to fight for her freedom. Notice the neatness of her hair and clothes as Jackson sits in the comfort of her yard, how do you think her life changed after she became free? Ohio Historical Society.
     
  7. Asomfwaa

    Asomfwaa Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    My only quibble is with calling our ancestors 'slaves.' 'Slave' in the Western sense, depicts a being less than human. So personally I prefer the term 'enslaved' which really gets to the knitty-gritty. That is--we were never 'slaves,' we were solely 'enslaved.'

    Otherwise, I thank you for the information.
     
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  8. Khasm13

    Khasm13 STAFF STAFF

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    looks like a brother/sister was reading the fugitive slave act/law and pulled out a pistol to voice their disagreement....lol
    good ish info....

    one love
    khasm
     
  9. info-moetry

    info-moetry STAFF STAFF

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  10. MS234

    MS234 Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Great thread. I for one will NEVER Under appreciate what our ancestors had to deal with.
     
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