Black People : Real ish in Pakistan/ Taliban, or tally dope dollars?

Discussion in 'Black People Open Forum' started by Ankhur, Jul 28, 2010.

  1. Ankhur

    Ankhur Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Pakistan's national economy is 70% heroin

    HEROIN, TALIBAN & PAKISTAN

    by B.Raman

    (To be read in continuation of the earlier article dated 30-4-00 and titled "Heroinisation of The Pakistani Economy" at www.saag.org/notes/note87.html )

    ------------------------------

    Pakistan's illegal heroin economy has kept its legitimate State economy sustained since 1990 and prevented its collapse. It has also enabled it to maintain a high level of arms purchases from abroad and to finance its proxy war against India through the jehadi organisations.

    While no estimate of the money spent by it on its proxy war is available, it has been estimated by Pakistani analysts ("Friday Times" March 9 to 15,2001) that about 80 per cent of its total external debt of US $ 38 billion, that is, about US $ 30.4 billion, was incurred on arms purchases since 1990. This includes its purchases of aircraft and missiles from China, missiles from North Korea, for which payment was made partly in cash and partly in imported US and Australian wheat, Agosta class submarines from France, reconditioned Mirage aircraft from France, Lebanon and Australia and other items from countries such as Ukraine. The clandestine procurement of nuclear technology and material from Western countries and the Chinese-aided nuclear power station at Chashma were also financed through external borrowing.

    The use of the heroin dollars for such purposes started after the withdrawal of the Soviet troops from Afghanistan in 1988. In the 1980s, at the instance of the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) of the US, the Internal Political Division of the Inter-Services Intelligence (ISI), headed by Brig (retd). Imtiaz, who worked directly under Lt.Gen.Hamid Gul, the DG of the ISI during the later years of Zia-ul-Haq and during the first few months of Mrs.Benazir Bhutto's first tenure as the Prime Minister (1988-90), started a special cell for the use of heroin for covert actions
    http://www.southasiaanalysis.org/\papers3\paper288.html
     
  2. Ankhur

    Ankhur Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    So really what is being shipped between the borders of Pakistan and Afghanistan, that the press does not mention?

    [​IMG]

    According to now head of the Military Leon Panetta, there are less then 100 Al Queda in Afghanistan, and according to any high school student with a knowledge of Asian natural resources there is not much oil in Afghanistan, and not much acquired from there since 9/11, or even a pipeline.

    So what is all this blood shed about?

    November 26, 2011
    Tensions Flare Between U.S. and Pakistan After Strike

    By SALMAN MASOOD and ERIC SCHMITT

    ISLAMABAD, Pakistan — Pakistani officials said on Saturday that NATO aircraft had killed at least 25 soldiers in strikes against two military posts at the northwestern border with Afghanistan, and the country’s supreme army commander called them unprovoked acts of aggression in a new flash point between the United States and Pakistan.
    The Pakistani government responded by ordering the Central Intelligence Agency to vacate the drone operations it runs from Shamsi Air Base, in western Pakistan, within 15 days. It also closed the two main NATO supply routes into Afghanistan, including the one at Torkham. NATO forces receive roughly 40 percent of their supplies through that crossing, which runs through the Khyber Pass, and Pakistan gave no estimate for how long the routes might be shut down.
    A NATO spokesman said it was likely that allied airstrikes caused the Pakistani casualties, but said an investigation had been ordered to determine the cause.
    In Washington, American officials were scrambling to assess what had happened amid preliminary reports that allied forces in Afghanistan engaged in a firefight along the border and called in airstrikes. Senior Obama administration officials were also weighing the implications on a relationship that took a sharp turn for the worse after a Navy Seal commando raid killed Osama bin Laden near Islamabad in May, and that has deteriorated since then.
    “Senior U.S. civilian and military officials have been in touch with their Pakistani counterparts from Islamabad, Kabul and Washington to express our condolences, our desire to work together to determine what took place and our commitment to the U.S.-Pakistan partnership, which advances our shared interests, including fighting terrorism in the region,” said Caitlin Hayden, a spokeswoman for the National Security Council.
    In a sign that the White House was trying to keep the situation from growing worse, President Obama was updated regularly throughout the day by Thomas E. Donilon, the national security adviser, Ms. Hayden said.
    Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton; Gen. Martin E. Dempsey, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff; and Gen. John R. Allen, the commander of the NATO-led forces in Afghanistan, all talked to their Pakistani counterparts to offer condolences and to promise an investigation, administration officials said.
    Mrs. Clinton and Defense Secretary Leon E. Panetta issued a joint statement late Saturday endorsing the investigation and offering their “deepest condolences” to Pakistan.
    General Allen, in a separate statement, said, “This incident has my highest personal attention and my commitment to thoroughly investigate it to determine the facts.”
    The strikes, which Pakistani officials said involved both helicopters and fighter jets, took place overnight at two military posts in Salala, a village in Pakistan’s Mohmand tribal region near the border with Kunar Province in Afghanistan. At least 40 soldiers were deployed at the posts, Pakistani military officials said, adding that NATO aircraft had penetrated roughly a mile and a half into Pakistan to make the strikes.
    What remained unclear on Saturday, and what will be a main focus of NATO’s inquiry, was what exactly prompted the airstrikes and whether they were unprovoked or resulted from a communications mishap. A NATO spokesman, Brig. Gen. Carsten Jacobson, offered details suggesting that allied and Afghan troops operating near the border came under fire from unknown enemies and summoned coalition warplanes for help.
    “In the early night hours of this morning, a force consisting of Afghan forces and coalition forces, in the eastern border area where the Durand Line is not always 100 percent clear, got involved in a firefight,” General Jacobson said, according to a transcript of his statements on NATO TV that the alliance provided American officials on Saturday. (The Durand Line is the colonial-era boundary between Pakistan and Afghanistan.)
    “Air force was called in into this activity,” he said, “and we have to look into this situation of what actually happened on the ground.”
    General Jacobson told BBC television that it was “highly likely” that the airstrikes caused the Pakistani casualties. Several American and allied military, diplomatic and intelligence officials contacted on Saturday said it was unclear what threat, real or perceived, led to the airstrikes or why the allied aircraft fired on the Pakistani troops.
    Maj. Gen. Athar Abbas, the Pakistan Army spokesman, told Pakistan’s Geo TV that the United States had been provided the grid locations of all Pakistani border outposts.
    Such cross-border attacks have been at the heart of an increasingly hostile relationship between Pakistani and American officials. The United States has demanded that Pakistan do more to stop militants based in its territory, particularly from the feared Haqqani network and Al Qaeda, from crossing into Afghanistan to attack American forces. And United States forces in eastern Afghanistan say they have taken more mortar and rocket fire from positions at or near active Pakistani military posts in recent months, despite complaints to Pakistan about it.
    http://www.nytimes.com/2011/11/27/w...r=1&sq=pakistan&st=cse&scp=3&pagewanted=print
     
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