Black Spirituality Religion : Rasta's - question

Discussion in 'Black Spirituality / Religion - General Discussion' started by KMTSista, Feb 5, 2010.

  1. KMTSista

    KMTSista Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    When exactly did it begin that Rasta's started to embrace white people and start this "one love" mess?

    It is so confusing to go around reading people embracing whites then quoting the honorable Marcus Garvey. Isn't this a contradiction to the ORIGINAL purpose and cause for Rastafarism?

    I've talked to many Rasta's, especially those that follow the Marley family and they always say crap like "Rasta no believe in racism". Even the Marley brothers themselves seem to love light bright and **** near white women.

    Didn't Ziggy marry a white Jew?
     
  2. awo dino

    awo dino Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    First, let us acknowledge the debt owed to Rastafari for de-centering the Christian church as the context for black liberation theology. God as Afrikan, or better yet as Afro-Jamaican. Ase. The Caribbean is a place of tremendous religious complexity, but the one unifying thing is the oneness of music and religion. There is a sense that music has a divine source and power. In Afrika and the Caribbean, religion is embedded in the culture, in everyday life. Due to the global popularity of Reggae music as interpreted by the late Robert Nesta Marley, it was only a matter of time before you had white folk wearing dreads. Rastafarianism becomes part of pop culture. Marley removed the “dread” from Rastafari (not purposefully). In the Jamaican context, the dread look and “dread talk” (tools of resistance) were feared by the society, but outside this context, they are meaningless.
    It wasn’t all bad, though. Rastafari was/is a religion of salvation, a religion for the poor and the powerless. But as it became popular, it received the attention of the black intelligentsia in Jamaica and sparked the creation of a black power movement in Jamaica, and opened the door for middle class involvement. Rasta seeks to create a just society in which the dignity of all people is affirmed. The first goal is liberation from the stifling effects of poverty. Rastas understood that the middle class would have to be a part of the project, but would have to learn from the rastas because they were a part of “Babylon.” The second hurdle is freedom from economic dependency in a global capitalist system. Also, a decolonizing of the mind. Deep within the Caribbean mind is the notion that the foreign is better. The rejection of the English language and the creation of dread talk might be their greatest contribution to Jamaican society and the highest form of protest. For Rastas the biggest sign of their alienation from Afrika and blackness was the requirement to speak English – the language of Babylon. Through their language, they have the power to define their own reality on their own terms. Rastas pray, “Jah lead us not into imitation.”
    Anyways, through the music, Rasta ideas were disseminated in Jamaican society and eventually globally. It is the commercial aspect of Rasta music, that brings the one-love idea as an acceptance of whites or Babylon simply to sell records. Make no mistake, true Rastas reject all things “Babylon,” including white people. However, if whites can reject Babylon, then they would be accepted.
    The original intent of the song “One Love,” is found in another strategy of liberation, the strategy of using the doctrine of creation to sustain hope.

    “as it is in the beginning (one love!)”
    “so shall it be in the end (one heart!)”

    The purpose of creation is one love and one heart. It is a theology of hope. Hope for the hopeless sinner – reconciliation. God’s love, the cause and reason for creation, calls into question the present order of society and calls for reconciliation. Marley is calling for a spiritual battle for the unification of the human race and reconciliation with God. This song would become the basis for a peace movement in Jamaica. Bob wanted unity; he understood that unity against Babylon was the next logical step in the movement. In his words, “God never made no difference between black, white, blue, pink or green. People is people, yuh know. That is the message we try to spread” (Taylor and Henry, Marley and Me). One thing the oppressor could not steal from the oppressed was their music, alluded to in my favorite Marley song, “Redemption song.” Maybe my favorite song, period.
     
  3. Ankhur

    Ankhur Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Rastas are not racially minded in fact there are several groups of White Rastas all over Europe, Canada, and this Wilderness.

    As far as the Nyabhingi, 12 Tribes and Bobo Dread they have different tenents regarding race, and the Bobo Dread have nothing to do with Europeans.

    Marley came to Rasta late in the scene in the 70s, and before that during the 50s and 60s Rastafarian mighty Dread would paint the soles of their feet white and walk barefoot to show teir disdain for the opressor
     
  4. awo dino

    awo dino Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Actually, Marley came into the religion way before the seventies. Rastas are very racially minded in the sense that they reject the white man's God and have a Black God. The idea of a Black God is central to their beliefs. But it is also a rejection of the global system, which is "white," and class. It is a Judeo-Christian based religion, and they consider themselves the true Isrealites. So to say they weren't "racially minded" is not quite true.
    The other things you mention are Afrikan based (west side). In Afrikan ATR's you had a dichotomy of sorts between priests and sorcerers. Sorcerers were usually chased out of town, so to speak. One only turns to sorcery under extreme conditions - such as a brutal slave regime. So, sorcerers were needed to fight the opressor in every way imaginable. Thus the rise of sorcery in the Caribbean. In Jamaica they had the Obeah, which were the sorcerers, but there were "priests" (good guys) who also fell under the title, like Marley's grandfather.

     
  5. Ankhur

    Ankhur Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    The point is in reference to the question the sister mentioned and in reference to other posts about accepting whites into a ATR

    They get bristled and upset when you mention political things about the white man, they are very non racial, and that is from talking to Rastafarians for over 33 years here in Brooklyn, were the Nyabhingi, Bobo Dread, and Twelve Tribes are well represented.
    Marley just started growing locks in the 70s in fact I have some albums that show his "baby dread"
     
  6. KMTSista

    KMTSista Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    As always Madese Pa Pa for your intellect my brother!
     
  7. Nelson Ankh

    Nelson Ankh Banned MEMBER

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    All Dread Isn't Rasta, All Rasta Isn't Dread:fyi:
     
  8. Ankhur

    Ankhur Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    what does that have to do with reading comprehension?

    Come to NYC and Bruckner Blvd and speak to the Jamaican long standing Rastafarian community or East Flatbush, Crown Heights and Brownsville and speak to the Trinidadian Rastafarian community and see what they tell you about white folks
     
  9. awo dino

    awo dino Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    There he goes again, just like i said on the thread regarding "can't we all get along?" putney wouldn't last a day before he went back to his usual ignorant, "look at me" behavior.

    :qqb017:
     
  10. Corvo

    Corvo navigator of live MEMBER

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    Awo Dino, what would be a good online source on Rastafari? ​
     
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