Black Spirituality Religion : RAMADAN, THE MUSLIM HOLY MONTH...

Discussion in 'Black Spirituality / Religion - General Discussion' started by Aqil, Nov 16, 2001.

  1. Aqil

    Aqil Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Ramadan is the ninth and holiest month of the Islamic lunar year. During this month Muslims all over the world observe the fourth pillar of the religion of Islam: the fast of Ramadan. It is Islam’s holiest month because it was during this time that Prophet Muhammad (saw) received his initial commission as a prophet; received his first revelation; and ten years later made his historic hijrah (i.e., flight) from the Holy City of Mecca – the place of his birth – to Medina, the place of his death.

    To commemorate these great occasions, all able-bodied Muslims not involved in crises (e.g., war or unavoidable journeys) fast during the month of Ramadan. From sunrise to sunset neither food nor drink passes a Muslim’s lips. After sundown Muslims may partake in moderation...

    Being a month in a lunar calendar, Ramadan rotates around the year. When it falls in the winter its demands are not excessive. When, on the other hand, it falls during the scorching summers, to remain active during the long days without so much as a drop of water is an ordeal. Why, then, does the Qur’an (Muslim Holy Book) require it? For one thing, fasting teaches self-discipline; he who can endure its demands will have less difficulty controlling his appetite at other times. Fasting underscores man’s dependence upon God...

    Man, says the Qur’an, is as frail as the rose petal; nevertheless, he assumes airs and pretensions. Fasting reminds him vividly of his essential frailty and dependence. Finally, fasting sensitizes compassion. Only those who have been hungry can know what hunger means. If a man has himself fasted for 30 days within the year he will be inclined to listen more carefully the next time he is approached by someone in need.

    Fasting, as a religious institution – in whatever form or detail – is to be found in all faiths. “By the greater number of religions – in the lower, middle and higher cultures alike – fasting is largely prescribed; and when it is not required, it is nevertheless practiced to some extent by individuals in response to the prompting of nature.” (Ency. Brit.)

    It is the common experience of saints and seers alike that a certain degree of severance from physical relations or worldly connections is essential for spiritual advancement, and has a powerful, purifying effect on the mind. The religion of Islam, however, has introduced a new orientation and a new spiritual significance to this institution. According to it fasting continues a symbol of complete sacrifice. One who fasts not only abstains from food and drink – which are the chief means of sustenance and without which one cannot live – but also from conjugal relations with one’s wife, which is the means of assuring one’s progeny. Thus he who fasts really evinces his readiness, if need be, to sacrifice his all for the sake of Allah (swt).

    The word “ramadan” derived from “ramada.” They say in Arabic, “ramada al-saimu,” i.e., the insides of the man fasting became very hot with thirst owing to fasting. The month is so-named because (a) fasting in this month produces heat and burning due to thirst; (b) worship in this month burns away traces of sin in man; and (c) because his devotions in this month produce in the heart of man the necessary warmth of love for his Creator and his fellow beings.

    The name Ramadan is of Islamic origin, the former name of the month being “Natiq.” It was on the 24th of Ramadan that Prophet Muhammad (saw) received his first revelation; and the whole revelation was rehearsed every year to the Holy Prophet (saw) by the angel Jibril (or Gabriel) in this month. The practice continued until the very last year of the Prophet’s life, when the whole of the Qur’an was rehearsed to him twice by the angel Jibril in this month. Thus, in a way, the whole of the Qur’an may be said to have been revealed in the month of Ramadan.

    The Islamic lunar calendar has 12 months based on lunar phases, producing a year that is 10 or 11 days shorter than a solar year. Since no extra month is intercalated, Ramadan moves backward through the seasons, returning to the same place every 32½ years.

    According to the Holy Qur’an, a month begins when the crescent of the New Moon is first visible to the naked eye. But before the month of Ramadan can begin, this phenomenon must first be seen by two people and reported to a qadi (judge). Then the fast of Ramadan begins, and lasts the entire month, ending with the great three-day feast and festival of Eid al-Fitr.
     
  2. Aqil

    Aqil Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    RAMADAN MUBARAK!
    RAMADAN KARIM!
     
  3. Aqil

    Aqil Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Man, says the Qur’an, is as frail as the rose petal; nevertheless, he assumes airs and pretensions. Fasting reminds him vividly of his essential frailty and dependence. Finally, fasting sensitizes compassion. Only those who have been hungry can know what hunger means. If a man has himself fasted for 30 days within the year he will be inclined to listen more carefully the next time he is approached by someone in need...
     
  4. Aqil

    Aqil Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    The Islamic lunar calendar has 12 months based on lunar phases, producing a year that is 10 or 11 days shorter than a solar year. Since no extra month is intercalated, Ramadan moves backward through the seasons, returning to the same place every 32½ years...

    According to the Holy Qur’an, a month begins when the crescent of the New Moon is first visible to the naked eye. But before the month of Ramadan can begin, this phenomenon must first be seen by two people and reported to a qadi (judge)...
     
  5. Pharaoh Jahil

    Pharaoh Jahil Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Thanx for the knowledge!



    Allah U Akbar...........
     
  6. Aqil

    Aqil Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    You're quite welcome, Pharaoh Jahil...
     
  7. Aqil

    Aqil Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    The Islamic calendar (or Hijri calendar) is a purely lunar calendar. It contains 12 months that are based on the motion of the Moon, and because 12 synodic months is only 354 days (12×29.53=354.36), the Islamic calendar is consistently shorter than a tropical year, and therefore it shifts with respect to the Christian calendar.

    The Islamic calendar is based on the Qur'an (Sura 9:36,37) and its proper observance is a sacred duty for Muslims. It is the official calendar in countries around the Gulf, especially Saudi Arabia. But other Muslim countries use the Gregorian calendar for civil purposes and only turn to the Islamic calendar for religious purposes.

    The Islamic lunar calendar has 12 months based on the phases of the Moon, producing a year that is 10 or 11 days shorter than a solar year. Since no extra month is intercalated, Ramadan moves backward through the seasons, returning to the same place every 32½ years...

    "O you who believe, fasting is prescribed on you as it was prescribed to those before you so that you may become self-restrained."

    (Sura Al-Baqarah 2:183)
     
  8. NADIA*BINTA

    NADIA*BINTA Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    As-Salaam Alaikum Aqil

    know this is a lil late... BUT... RAMADAN MUBARAK! RAMADAN KARIM! to you and yours...

    didn't have chance to partake of this food during Holy month of Ramadan... but just tasted this thread and want to thank you for putting this information out here...

    there are many, many misconceptions of Islam and/or Muslims and you are offering more understanding and shedding much more light on this beautiful way of life...

    pray your Ramadan was, meaningful, successful, enlightening... mine was... also pray you keep producing these works for Allah... and educating us all!

    peace & blessings to you & yours
    nadia*binta
     
  9. Aqil

    Aqil Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    As-Salaamu-Alaikum my sister...and shokran for your kind and inspiring words.

    Jazaka-'lah...
     
  10. Aqil

    Aqil Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    The only difference between Ramadan and total fasting is the timing. During Ramadan we basically miss lunch and take an early breakfast, and do not eat until dusk...

    Abstinence from water during this period is not bad at all and in fact, it causes concentration of all fluids within the body, producing slight dehydration. The body has its own water conservation mechanism; in fact, it has been shown that slight dehydration and water conservation, at least in plant life, improve their longevity...

    The physiological effect of fasting includes lower of blood sugar, lowering of cholesterol and lowering of the systolic blood pressure. In fact, Ramadan fasting would be an ideal recommendation for treatment of mild-to-moderate, stable, non-insulin diabetes, obesity and essential hypertension...

    (This year Ramadan begins at the time of the New Moon on Wednesday, Oct. 13, and ends at the time of the New Moon on Friday, Nov. 12th)
     
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