Black Parenting : Raising Our Kids Not To See Color?

Discussion in 'Black Parenting' started by MsInterpret, Jan 15, 2013.

  1. MsInterpret

    MsInterpret Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    I've had discussions with other parent's on race, a lot of them say that they raise their "child not to see color".

    Do you raise your child(ren) to not see color?

    Is there any benefit to this? Or does this cause more harm then good?

     
  2. Asomfwaa

    Asomfwaa Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Some folk don't even raise their kids. (Teasing)

    I would neither advise nor deem it possible to raise a person to be colorblind; because everything about our society is very colored. Early in school you learn about Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and learn that one color was pitted against another. You then learn of slavery, Frederick Douglass, Phyllis Wheatley . . . you watch on TV Basketball, Football, Swimming . . . you hear Rock Music then Rap Music then Pop Music . . . you go to your corner store, you go to your nail salon, you go to your church . . . even your classroom is racially segregated . . . through all of this color is everywhere.

    The good part on raising someone to see color is raising someone to respect their color; because otherwise, all those other things will tell you to disrespect it!
     
  3. Kemetstry

    Kemetstry going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    A lot of black people did this to their children and then watch as life handed their heads to them. And as soon as he gets in trouble, ( OJ, Tiger ) we'll see what they say then





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  4. MsVeraisblessed

    MsVeraisblessed Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    this discussion is greatly debated by parents raising mixed kids and black parents raising their children to accept people for who they are... Its never ending..
     
  5. Kemetstry

    Kemetstry going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    There is no such thing as mixed amongst black people






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  6. MsVeraisblessed

    MsVeraisblessed Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    there you go again,..i had deleted that and corrected it...LOL...sheesh...i need to be quicker..
     
  7. Kemetstry

    Kemetstry going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    :10900:





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  8. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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    Historically and culturally, Blacks in America have always known that we had to be twice better to even be considered half as good as our white counterparts/peers.
    The stereotypes about the lack of intelligence in maths, sciences and the arts among African-descendants pervades this country and the world.

    This is why we still celebrate and acknowledge all our "FIRSTS" in any and every field or area that has historically been white-dominated. (And, unfortunately, too many of us continue to claim those who don't claim US.)

    This is why we have "Black History Month" and "Black Studies" in colleges/universities.

    This is why we hear white commentators make statements like, "He's very articulate" when speaking of a Black man's speech/vocabulary.

    So, for any Black family or bi-racial family raising their children NOT to see skin color in themselves or others when the rest of the world certainly sees THEIRS is beyond me.

    Tiger Woods was also raised this way. According to him, he acknowledges all of his racial make-up: Caucasian/Black/and Asian. So, he is "Cablasian." --- But, back when he first won the Masters Tournament, all Fuzzy Zoeller saw was BLACK when he said, "..tell him not to serve fried chicken or collard greens or whatever the hell they serve." as the menu for the traditional dinner set by the winner.
    I don't agree that it benefits a Black child to go into the world with "rose-colored glasses on" or "blind-folded" about race.

    I also don't like it when White people say, "Well, I don't see your skin color."
    This always trips me out to hear them say this like we're supposed to be happy about it, grab them and say, "THANK YOU so much for saying that!" (smh)

    This is how white people divest themselves of their history in this country and the world, oppressing other Peoples.... This is how they convince themselves that we now live in a "post-racial society."...This is why they say things like, "Well, I didn't have anything to do with slavery. My grandparents/great-grandparents didn't own any slaves."

    This is a distortion of the "I Have A Dream" speech.


    In this speech, MLK was talking about slavery and Jim Crow and how our SKIN COLOR contributed to how we were treated and viewed in this country. And all that history is a part of us and who we are, all tied up and in the very pores of our SKIN COLOR.

    So, if white folks don't see my skin color, then you don't see ME!

    My "skin color" is a part of who and what I am; a part of my family's history, struggles, sacrifices and pains; and all that makes up ME as the Black woman I am.

    So, when a Black man who identifies himself as Black and with/within the Black Experience wants a woman who can identify with his story, his life, his history, and his struggles/challenges, then he gets a BLACK WOMAN.

    But, a Black man who wants to separate himself and divest himself of his "Black-ness" and align himself with/within White society, then he gets a WHITE WOMAN who "doesn't see his skin color."

    When I see, other races, Native Indians, East Indians or Asians, I see their SKIN COLOR and the histories behind them and how their SKIN COLORS have been under the yoke of white supremacy as mine has.
     
  9. info-moetry

    info-moetry STAFF STAFF

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    peace

    No, I raised him to see things for what they are and not how they present themselves to be.
     
  10. dunwiddat

    dunwiddat Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    How can someone claim not to see color.:( White folks see it all the time. I believe we have to be realistic. Black folks colour is what have them on the bottom round of the economic totem pole. So for parents not to see this as an issue is being a bit naive. We were treated in the worse possible way during slavery. Rosa Parks is part of history and SHE KNEW ABOUT COLOUR. To make a statement like that is to deny reality.

    Do these parents believe that anything has changed. OUR COLOUR IS WHO WE ARE.
     
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