Black People : RACISM GROWING UNDER #45

Discussion in 'Black People Open Forum' started by Kemetstry, Jun 26, 2017.

  1. Kemetstry

    Kemetstry going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Teens taunted biracial boy, hung him from rope: family
    CLAREMONT, N.H. — Teenagers in New Hampshire taunted an 8-year-old biracial boy with racial slurs and then pushed him off of a picnic table with a rope around his neck, injuring him, the boy’s fami…
    nypost.com




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    Last edited: Sep 13, 2017
  2. Kemetstry

    Kemetstry going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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  3. Kemetstry

    Kemetstry going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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  4. Kemetstry

    Kemetstry going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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  5. Kemetstry

    Kemetstry going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    LINKED TO 3rd SHOOTING
    BATON ROUGE, La. (AP) — A 23-year-old white man arrested Tuesday was accused of killing two black men and firing on a black family in a string of attacks that police say may have been racially motivated. A law enforcement official said they had found a copy of an Adolf Hitler speech at the home of Kenneth James Gleason, and investigators said DNA on shell casings and other evidence link him to the crimes.
    Gleason was led away from the police department in handcuffs just before authorities there held a news conference to announce that he would be charged with first-degree murder in the shooting deaths last week of a homeless man and a dishwasher who was walking to work. "I feel confident that this killer would have killed again," interim Police Chief Jonny Dunnam said. Gleason's attorney, J. Christopher Alexander, said his client "vehemently denies guilt, and we look forward to complete vindication." Alexander declined to say anything else.
    Authorities found a copy of the Hitler speech during a search of Gleason's home over the weekend, according to the law enforcement official who spoke to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity because the investigation was ongoing.

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    Kenneth Gleason is shown in an undated booking photo provided by the East Baton Rouge Sheriff’s Office. Police believe the slayings of two black men in Baton Rouge were likely racially motivated and said Sunday, Sept. 17, 2017, that they have a person of interest — Gleason— in custody. Gleason, was being held on drug charges. Authorities do not yet have enough evidence to charge him with murder, Baton Rouge Sgt. L'Jean McKneely told The Associated Press. (East Baton Rouge Sheriff’s Office via AP)
    Asked whether police suspect race was a motive for the shootings, Sgt. L'Jean McKneely said: "We're not completely closed off to that. We're looking at all possibilities at this time, so we're not going to just pinpoint that." District Attorney Hillar Moore said his office could seek the death penalty. "It appears to be cold, calculated, planned (against) people who were unarmed and defenseless," he said.
    "We don't need to prove motive. There are a lot of things that are unanswered." No one was injured when Gleason fired multiple times into the home of a black family in his neighborhood on Sept. 11, authorities said. It's not clear if Gleason knew the family. In the other shootings, Gleason fired from his car then walked up to the victims as they were lying on the ground and fired again multiple times, police said. Neither victim had any prior relationship with Gleason. The first fatal shooting occurred Sept. 12 when 59-year-old Bruce Cofield, who was homeless, was shot to death.
    The second happened last Thursday night when 49-year-old Donald Smart was gunned down while walking to his job as a dishwasher at a cafe popular with Louisiana State University students. The attacks came at a time when Louisiana's capital already was in the grips of a surge in violence.
    The number of homicides in East Baton Rouge Parish has already surpassed last year's total of 62, The Advocate newspaper reported earlier this month. "Baton Rouge has been through a lot of turmoil in the last year. Has there not been a swift conclusion to this case, I feel confident that this killer probably would have killed again," the police chief said. "He could have potentially created a tear in the fabric that holds this community together." Racial tensions roiled the city in the summer of 2016 when a black man was shot to death by white police officers outside of a convenience store.
    About two weeks later, a black gunman targeted police in an ambush, killing three officers and wounding three others before he was shot to death. The city of about 229,000 is about 55 percent black and 40 percent white. Gleason didn't appear to have any active social media profiles. A spokesman at Louisiana State University said a student by that name attended the university from the fall of 2013 to the fall of 2014 before withdrawing. He had transferred to LSU from Baton Rouge Community College. During the search of Gleason's home, authorities also found 9 grams of marijuana and vials of human growth hormone, according to a police document



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  6. Kemetstry

    Kemetstry going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Firefighter suspended after racist Facebook post resigns


    [​IMG]© (Facebook) Tyler Roysdon has been suspended from his position for racist comments

    DAYTON, Ohio — A volunteer firefighter in Ohio suspended after a Facebook post in which he allegedly indicated he would save a dog from a burning building before a black person has resigned.
    Officials say 20-year-old Tyler Roysdon resigned Monday from the Franklin Township Fire Department. He was suspended without pay after the fire chief learned of the post.
    The post containing multiple racial slurs had been ordered removed by township officials, who called the content "unacceptable."
    A woman who identified herself to WXIX-TV as Joei Frame Roysdon said she's Roysdon's wife. She said he "admitted that he said things that were wrong and apologized." She said everyone deserves a second chance.
    A phone number could not be found for Tyler Roysdon.




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  7. Kemetstry

    Kemetstry going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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  8. Kemetstry

    Kemetstry going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Fire chief who directed racial slur at Steelers' Mike Tomlin is out of a job
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    Video by CBS News
    Fire chief who directed racial slur at Steelers' Mike Tomlin is out of a job

    The fire chief in a town outside Pittsburgh is out of a job after he targeted a racial slur at Steelers head coach Mike Tomlin on Facebook over the team’s decision stay in the locker room for the national anthem on Sunday.
    Paul Smith, the chief of Cecil Township Volunteer Fire Station No. 2, wrote: “Tomlin just added himself to the list of no good (n------). Yes I said it.”
    Smith’s use of the slur drew a rebuke from officials in Cecil, a town located about 20 miles southwest of Pittsburgh, and, later Tuesday, the township's board of supervisors announced "Smith is no longer the Volunteer Fire Chief at the Muse Volunteer Fire Company."


    The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette reported Tuesday that Smith had resigned.

    “The media dragged my fire company and township into this as well as my family,” said Paul Smith, former chief of the Muse Township Volunteer Fire Department in Cecil, in a statement to the newspaper.




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  9. Kemetstry

    Kemetstry going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Lions' Akeem Spence says his protest during anthem cost father job opportunity


    [​IMG]© Icon Sportswire via Getty Images Detroit Lions defensive tackle Akeem Spence runs through a drill during the Indianapolis Colts and Detroit Lions joint training camp practice on Aug. 11, 2017..

    Akeem Spence said his protest during the national anthem cost his father a job.
    According to a tweet Thursday by the Lions defensive tackle, a contractor refused to hire his father because Spence kneeled during the national anthem on Sunday.

    Spence's father, Floyd Spence, operates Spence Concrete Contractors in Navarre, Fla.
    Spence was among eight Lions players to kneel during the anthem. He even took to his Instagram account to post a picture of him kneeling with his teammates, which included Ameer Abdullah and Tahir Whitehead.
    He has also been vocal on Twitter about the protests, calling out President Donald Trump and reiterating he won't just stick to sports.
    Spence signed with the Lions during the offseason after spending four years with the Buccaneers. He said he made the decision to kneel in last Sunday's game in response Trump's comments about players kneeling during the anthem.





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  10. Kemetstry

    Kemetstry going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    At Air Force Academy, Black Students Told to ‘Go Home’

    [​IMG]© REUTERS/Joseph Campbell RTS1DZI7

    The U.S. Air Force Academy is currently investigating an incident of racial slurs written on the dormitory message boards of five black cadets at the Air Force Academy Preparatory School earlier this week.
    Lieutenant Colonel Allen Heritage, director of public affairs for the academy, told Air Force Times the slurs were discovered Monday after one of the cadet’s mother’s posted a photo to Facebook on Wednesday that shows a white board with the words “go home n***** on it. The post has since been removed.
    “This is why I’m so hurt!” the mother said. “These young people are supposed to bond and protect each other and the country. Who would my son have to watch out for? The enemy or the enemy?”


    Lieutenant General Jay Silveria, superintendent of the academy released a statement Thursday condemning the slurs. “There is absolutely no place in our Air Force for racism,” Silveria said. “It’s not who we are, nor will we tolerate it in any shape or fashion. The Air Force Academy strives to create a climate of dignity and respect for all.... Period.... Those who don’t understand that are behind the power curve and better catch up.”
    “You should be outraged not only as an airman, but a human being,” he continued.
    The five black students involved in the attacks are part of a group called Cadet Candidates, which is comprised of young men and women who show potential in earning a spot in the academy.


    The academy hosted a “Critical Conversations” event on Monday night with 145 cadets to talk about the recent events, according to a Facebook post.
    Heritage said the academy’s security forces are looking into the incident as well, but it has no additional information to release at the moment.
    After the Charlottesville attacks in August, many U.S military leaders took to Twitter to condemn racism after President Donald Trump compared the violent neo-Nazis to the counterprotesters who opposed them.
    General David L. Goldfein, chief of staff of the Air Force, tweeted that he stood “together with my fellow service chiefs in saying that we’re always stronger together.”
    Commandant General Robert Neller, the leader of the U.S. Marines, said that there was “no place for racial hatred or extremism in @USMC.”
    “Our core values of honor, courage and commitment frame the way Marines live and act,” he said.




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