Black Spirituality Religion : ***"Racial Sentiments"***

Discussion in 'Black Spirituality / Religion - General Discussion' started by Fine1952, Jul 26, 2007.

  1. Fine1952

    Fine1952 Happy Winter Solstice MEMBER

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    "...What is sad about the effect of racism on Christianity is that in all their racist sentiments, {so-called--my insert} superior Europeans could not imagine or create their own God, a Son of this God, or his Virgin Mother. They simply turned the black ones they had adopted and worshiped for centuries into white images to satisfy racism and racial prejudice through skin color. Truth has never influenced the bigot, but false learning and lies always have..." page 188, paragraph one "The Africans Who Wrote The Bible" by Dr. Alex Darkwah.

    ------

    Dr. Darkwah knows what he is talking about and what I like most is he confirms what I've thought all along....!

    :bullseye:
     
  2. Blackbird

    Blackbird Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Kayira be Sister Fine1952,

    I might have to read Dr. Darkwah's book again. The first few times, I read it I hate to admit I was thoroughly disappointed. I found myself more often than not disagreeing with alot of the things he was proposing. I saw alot of his work as conjecture, amateurish linguistic twisting and sloppy connection. I found myself wanting. Shall have to look once again when I can get my hands on his work again.


    Niawe,
    Blackbird
     
  3. Music Producer

    Music Producer Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    I hate to say it but I also felt the same way in reading the first few pages and skimming the book. He is weak on referencing material and ideas. I tend to shy away from authors such as this because it makes their argument speculative.

    We have to support what we say with photos of artifacts or a historical record, it makes our words stronger.

    Peace and Love.
     
  4. Fine1952

    Fine1952 Happy Winter Solstice MEMBER

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    Thx for responding!

    Dr. Darkwah's book is very comprehensive. You cannot read the book in a week and expect to have memorized its contents cover to cover.

    I haven't.

    I have had his book since February 2005 and I am still discovering an important fact here and there that I overlooked.

    I am a speed reader meaning I read four to five words at a time. However, I have found that I have to slow down and 'smell' the roses so to speak.

    I do not underestimate Dr. Darkwah nor do I take him lightly. He is indigenous and therefore has built-in merit.
     
  5. Fine1952

    Fine1952 Happy Winter Solstice MEMBER

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    Thx for responding, 2! Yes, I agree -- we must have photos of artifacts or a historical record, it makes our words stronger. However, I prefer the hard core words, since I have more of an affinity to the words rather than the pictures.

    Of the 327 pages only these pages display pictures

    page 12 -- A "Bronze" Portrait of St. Peter in Rome
    page 154 -- The all seeing-eye
    page 161 -- The holding cell in Ghana -- The Elmina Castle
    page 164 -- European canons used to enforce slavery
    page 214 -- King Tutu Ankoma holding the symbol of the serpent
    page 235 -- Ancient Egyptian Chair found in the Akan Stool design in Ghana

    "The Africans Who Wrote The Bible" by Dr. Nana Banchie (Alex) Darkwah

    -------------

    Speaking on deep knowledge Anthony Browder says

    "...If a pictures is worth a thousand words than deep knowledge is worth a thousand pictures..."
     
  6. Blackbird

    Blackbird Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Aaskënö'kêôk, Sister Fine1952. Të'ë niyutyéê?

    The breadth of Dr. Darkwah's book is not to be underestimated. Of course, however, I have my reservations with his work. When I first heard about the book, I was ecstatic. I recall thinking now there is finally work out there, from a continental African under the tutelage of his elders, to expose all the lies and falsehoods pushed forward. I purchased the book back in 2003. Needlessly to say, as I previously said, I was thoroughly disappointed.

    Dr. Darkwah reminded me of another Ghanaian I knew. When I was an undergraduate student at Southern University, I mistakenly took a graduate-level course, African History, taught by a native-born Ghanaian, Dr. Danquah. Suffice to say, Dr. Danquah was least thrilled about African history and seemed to have a nonchalant attitude about it. I understood early on just because someone is African does make them any more credible that someone not regarding African history or geopolitics. Without offense intended, I'm from Louisiana, but I am far from completely knowledgeable about Louisiana Creoles and their history (Although I do have my take on it and family stories to coincide).

    The matter with Dr. Darkwah is his emphasis was moreso on proving the ancient Afrim (hypothetical) people were the primogenitors of the Hebrew people. As one those "white supremacy analysts" (joking from another thread), I smelled strong Western indocrination seeping through the pages of his work. Reading his work, I felt his goal was to, by any way possible, prove with ancedotal references and dubious linguistic acrobatics that, indeed, African people wrote the Bible. The strength of his argument wasn't formidable enough to carry his thesis over.

    Another disappointing note was the lack of connection of his people, the Akan, with the story being told. He stated this information is known throughout Africa and was told to him through oral lectures from his elders. My understanding of oral tradition is it speaks of the group of people telling the story as the central group and it tells of their origin, their travels and other pertinent cultural information. A true cultural comparison with an Akan component, that includes cosmology, priesthood hierarchy explanation, and other resources, was severely lacking in his discourse. Also, his constant mantra of "if you ask the Ewe or so and so" they will tell you didn't ring well with me.

    Lastly, I suppose it doesn't help that view Abraham as a fictional personage or a metaphor for group of mixed-ancestry invaders/conquerors storming down from the northeast.

    Blackbird
     
  7. Blackbird

    Blackbird Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Aaskënö'kêôk, Sister Fine1952. Të'ë niyutyéê?

    The breadth of Dr. Darkwah's book is not to be underestimated. Of course, however, I have my reservations with his work. When I first heard about the book, I was ecstatic. I recall thinking now there is finally work out there, from a continental African under the tutelage of his elders, to expose all the lies and falsehoods pushed forward. I purchased the book back in 2003. Needlessly to say, as I previously said, I was thoroughly disappointed.

    Dr. Darkwah reminded me of another Ghanaian I knew. When I was an undergraduate student at Southern University, I mistakenly took a graduate-level course, African History, taught by a native-born Ghanaian, Dr. Danquah. Suffice to say, Dr. Danquah was least thrilled about African history and seemed to have a nonchalant attitude about it. I understood early on just because someone is African does make them any more credible that someone not regarding African history or geopolitics. Without offense intended, I'm from Louisiana, but I am far from completely knowledgeable about Louisiana Creoles and their history (Although I do have my take on it and family stories to coincide).

    The matter with Dr. Darkwah is his emphasis was moreso on proving the ancient Afrim (hypothetical) people were the primogenitors of the Hebrew people. As one those "white supremacy analysts" (joking from another thread), I smelled strong Western indocrination seeping through the pages of his work. Reading his work, I felt his goal was to, by any way possible, prove with ancedotal references and dubious linguistic acrobatics that, indeed, African people wrote the Bible. The strength of his argument wasn't formidable enough to carry his thesis over.

    Another disappointing note was the lack of connection of his people, the Akan, with the story being told. He stated this information is known throughout Africa and was told to him through oral lectures from his elders. My understanding of oral tradition is it speaks of the group of people telling the story as the central group and it tells of their origin, their travels and other pertinent cultural information. A true cultural comparison with an Akan component, that includes cosmology, priesthood hierarchy explanation, and other resources, was severely lacking in his discourse. Also, his constant mantra of "if you ask the Ewe or so and so" they will tell you didn't ring well with me.

    Lastly, I suppose it doesn't help that view Abraham as a fictional personage or a metaphor for group of mixed-ancestry invaders/conquerors storming down from the northeast.

    Blackbird
     
  8. Fine1952

    Fine1952 Happy Winter Solstice MEMBER

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    How strange...

    When a black scholar -- most especially an intellectual from africa -- speaks, he is questioned.

    But let a white man speak and most knee-grows will just through the hoops he creates spontaneously and w/o question:?:
     
  9. Fine1952

    Fine1952 Happy Winter Solstice MEMBER

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    Same

    post as I've already responded to. :run:
     
  10. Fine1952

    Fine1952 Happy Winter Solstice MEMBER

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    Skimming w/o

    out pictures will definitely take you right through the book -- sorta like taking a enema.

    I took my time. And I am the wiser for it!