Black People : Racial Disparities in the U.S.

Discussion in 'Black People Open Forum' started by Destee, Jun 25, 2007.

  1. Destee

    Destee STAFF

    United States
    Jan 22, 2001
    Likes Received:
    betwixt and between
    +9,513 / -14
    Racial Disparities in the U.S.

    Medical Studies/Trials
    Published: Sunday, 24-Jun-2007

    How much do white Americans think it "costs" to be black in our society, given the problems associated with racial bias and prejudice?

    The answer, it appears, is not much.

    When white Americans were asked to imagine how much they would have to be paid to live the rest of their lives as a black person, most requested relatively low amounts, generally less than $10,000.

    In contrast, study participants said they would have to be paid about $1 million to give up television for the rest of their lives.

    The results suggest most white Americans don't truly comprehend the persisting racial disparities in our country, said Philip Mazzocco, co-author of the study and assistant professor of psychology at Ohio State University's Mansfield campus.

    "The costs of being black in our society are very well documented," Mazzocco said. "Blacks have significantly lower income and wealth, higher levels of poverty, and even shorter life spans, among many other disparities, compared to whites."

    For example, white households average about $150,000 more wealth than the typical black family. Overall, total wealth for white families is about five times greater than that of black families, a gap that has persisted for years.

    "When whites say they would need $1 million to give up TV, but less than $10,000 to become black, that suggests they don't really understand the extent to which African Americans, as a group, are disadvantaged," Mazzocco said.

    These results also offer insight as to why more than 9 out of 10 white Americans reject proposals to give reparations to the descendants of slaves, said study co-author Mahzarin Banaji, the Cabot Professor of Social Ethics at Harvard University.

    "Our data suggest that such resistance is not because white Americans are mean and uncaring, morally bankrupt, or ethically flawed," Banaji said.

    "White Americans suffer from a glaring ignorance about what it means to live as a black American."

    The study appears in the current issue of Harvard's Du Bois Review.

    Click Here To Read Entire Article