Pan Africanism : "RACE" FIRST OR TRIBAL AFFILIATION FIRST???

Discussion in 'Black History - Culture - Panafricanism' started by Isaiah, May 31, 2005.

  1. Isaiah

    Isaiah Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    "RACE" FIRST OR ETHNIC AFFILIATION FIRST???

    In the Sudan thread, James and PanAfrica are posing the question to African Religionists, adherents of the faith of Islam, "are you Black First?" This is a very powerful and complex question... It speaks to the dichotomy of thought between most African Diasporans and Continental Africans... For us, so-called racial solidarity is easy, almost a given, because we aint got much of a choice...

    For Continental Africans, there are more than 50 countries, and within those more than 50 countries, their are many ethnic groups and tribal affiliations... There are many languages and cultures and religions, and most everyone is African... But do Africans from the Continent think in terms such as Race above all else??? Or do they place their religion or cultural affiliations above this socio-political construct called race???

    In short, I don't think Continental Africans(for the most part)think in racial terms... They really don't have to... Additionally, the other factors are far more powerful than, say, whom is darker or lighter, than whom... I would that some African brothers and sisters would field this question - though it is open to all to think about and comment upon... The floor is open...

    PEace!
    Isaiah
     
  2. Kwango_Likemba

    Kwango_Likemba Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Mbote (hi) Brother Isaiah,

    Your question is pertinent, it’s a question African Americans should ask more often! As far I am concerned I would never be able to remove the pride I have to be Luba of the DR Congo, and the solidarity I have with the people of my ethnic group. There is nothing bad about having a "tribalist" conduct as long it’s not in a despotic or in a homicidal way..
    I have spoken many times of the Tutsi Presidents Paul kagame and Yoweri Museveni and the Tutsis forces causing human catastrophe and looting the land of the Congolese people in the DRC. I am sorry but right now I can't have solidarity for most of the Tutsis. It will take the end of human rights abuse, violence, disease and wars for a possible Panafricanism in Africa!
     
  3. Isaiah

    Isaiah Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Sister Kwango, Mbote to you, too!

    Yes, I am glad you seized the time to answer this question, because your answer provides African Diasporans with a look into the inner-thoughts of Continental brothes and sisters... Racism is not so fundamental a thing in Africa, as it is here in the United States, or in South America. Consequently, something that seems to come naturally to us here, may not apply in the Motherland...

    I think African Americans have run into a lot of trouble making this fundamental mistake... As you said, there is nothing wrong with the tribal affiliations as it were... It is just when those afilliations supercede the interests of the whole of the continent... But that is another whole convo... I just want us to understand that what might be so elementary to us here, because of our dealings with the White Man, may not resonate with others, and their experiences...

    Peace!
    Isaiah
     
  4. jamesfrmphilly

    jamesfrmphilly going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    granted, one ethnic group may have a problem with the next one but if the people do not see how this has been exploited by the white man to take over every ethnic group they will never be free.

    they will be always fighting each other over small things while the white man screws them all.
    i am disappointed.
     
  5. Ralfa'il

    Ralfa'il Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    When making a choice between race first or tribe/ethinicity first...

    I say race first.

    Once we take care of the greater external enemy, then we can work on defeating the enemy within.
     
  6. PurpleMoons

    PurpleMoons Administrator STAFF

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    I can understand where Sister Kwango_Likemba is comming from. If I witnessed brothers robbing my house, then killing my parents, and raping my Sisters, I don't know if I could unite with him for a greater cause. I would be distraught, angry, and vicious toward them. But then again, I have not experienced such, so I can't say for sure what my outcome would be.

    I'm more dedicated to my house first (my house being my people). An enemy to me, is someone who brings harm to my house. Religious nor tribal affiliations, could not alter the feelings I have for my people in a whole, but once I have been stabbed in the back by one of my own, chances are, my back won't ever be turned to them again.

    The truth is, we are not going to be able to have solidarity with everyone, within our race. Some will always be nothing more than an enemy, no matter how much we negotiate to bring forth a common cause.
     
  7. Isaiah

    Isaiah Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Sister Purple, James, and Brother Ralfa'il, you are all African Americans, and so am I... We really don't a choice as to be divided along tribal lines - though some knuckleheads in New York and Los Angeles seemed to think so in the 1990's... Y'all remember the infamous East Coast-West Coast fued that lead to the murders of Tupac Shakur and Christopher(Notorious Big)Wallace...

    The purpose of my question, though, was to bring about some understanding between Continentals and African Americans on nuances in our thinking, and why those nuances exist... It really is not about right and wrong...but rather how circumstances shape our thinking...

    Peace!
    Isaiah
     
  8. Kwango_Likemba

    Kwango_Likemba Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    More and more people in Africa know exaclty what's going on Brother Jamesfrmphilly! Sure, for you in the US it's the US government and Europeans masterminding (polishing) the wars and the genocides but to many Africans in Congo and Rwanda it's BLACK AFRICANS carrying things out!

    These days, Congolese actually SEE TUTSI RWANDANS doing much evil work! What attitude do you expect the Hutus Rwandans and the Congolese VICTIMS to have? In the US you have security and peace, in the Central Africa what Africans have? Don't overlook all of this Brother Jamesfrmphilly. Don't think I am wrong in my thinking when the Luba people and other ethinc groups in the RDC are victims of human rights abuse after abuse... a level a suffering you could never imagine!

    Sister PurpleMoons I agree with you! Thanks for taking the time to talk here.
     
  9. PurpleMoons

    PurpleMoons Administrator STAFF

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    Yes Brother, I got the point of your thread. It's like calling a Japanese a chinese. Just because they look alike, doesn't mean they feel the same.

    Many assume that just because a person may share many things in common, they will welcome you with open arms, which just isn't the case. There are many practices and beliefs to take into consideration.

    It's a very important question. Especially for someone who is planning to migrate back to the motherland. Will religion and or tribal association affect the socialization of an outsider? I don't believe this would be a problem for our continental Brothers and Sister who frequent this site though. I'm sure many don't feel as they do. This is a question that would be better suited for an continental African site. That way, we could get a larger insight of the question. I could be wrong though. I'm so looking forward for more responses from our continental brothers and Sisters.
     
  10. African_Prince

    African_Prince Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    I consider myself African first and foremost and am completely indifferent to nationality, region or 'tribe'.The individuals responsible for the Rwandan genocide and the atrocities in the Congo should be castrated and they are enemies to the African people, whatever ethnic group they come from ( 'tribe' is outdated but ethnic group sounds a little divisive ). The sad thing about Rwanda/Burundi is that the Hutu and Tutsi aren't really two distinct groups, they share the same language ( kinyarwanda/kirundi ) and prior to colonialism 'Hutu' and 'Tutsi' were more caste distinctions than ethnic ones. The Northern Arabs of Sudan ( or so called or whatever they are ) aren't really just 'tribalist', they consider themselves ethnically Arab, not Africans.

    "As far I am concerned I would never be able to remove the pride I have to be Luba of the DR Congo, and the solidarity I have with the people of my ethnic group."

    Interestingly, the Bemba of Zambia are an offshoot group of the great ancient Luba empire located in the present day Democratic Republic of Congo. They migrated into what is now the Northern province of Zambia from the southern part of what is now the DRC sometime in the 17th century. Bantu Africans period originated in what is now the Nigerian/Cameroon border region area and spread into central, southern and east Africa (proper) 4000 years ago.
     
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