Black People : R E S P E C T

Discussion in 'Black People Open Forum' started by truetothecause, Apr 4, 2010.

  1. truetothecause

    truetothecause Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    find out what it means to me


    Aretha Franklin sang this tune how long ago now:?: some 35 years ago or so.

    I think it is still a valid statement today....ESPECIALLY in times like these and being at this place now...

    "Respect" is the #1 Rule of the house yet, how many know what it TRULY means to another:?:

    Are you willing to share what it means to you?

    I think this was probably the topic of numerous threads. If so, if someone points me in the right direction, I'll pick up from there....

    LISTENING TO LEARN...
    cause I've
    LEARNED TO LISTEN :)


    Also, I keep in mind, our meanings of stuff CHANGES over time..so...what someone may have written here in the past may not be the same way they are thinking today.

    How do you define "Respect" as it relates to what or how you desire to treat you and the thoughts/feelings and experiences you share here?


    M.E.
    :hearts2:
     
  2. truetothecause

    truetothecause Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    I am certain I have stated here before, yet I will do so again, the meaning I hold with the term "respect".

    This meaning is drawn from conversations with those in the field/arena of psychology/psychoanalysis/behavioral health..you know...those types...

    We deal in the area of RELATIONSHIPS and Relational Dynamics.
    From an emotional and behavioral health perspective...I've come to this conclusion:

    The "root word" in this term is "spect" as in "spectacle". We use spectacles to SEE.

    When I ask for your "respect", I am asking that you "see me". That is, see me for who and what I say I am and NOT what others or you say.

    When I "respect" a person, I am less likely to "step on their toes". This makes me think however, of the preacher saying...
    I don't mean to step on any toes" or, "I didn't step on your toes did I"?

    Back to discourse....

    Although I may "see you" in all your beliefs or passions, I may disagree, yet, respect demands that I at least ACKNOWLEDGE you there. Hence, I may make mention of the REALITY you have presented of yourself and your thinking.

    To ignore what you state as your reality for me, is a sign of DISRESPECT...i.e...me going about AS IF you are not there or the 'belief' is not there..it does not exist.
    That's what it's like when I here whites or others advocating for a "color blind" world where one does not "see" the color of my skin and what it represents and has represented here.

    SEE ME...I'm an AFREEKAN...shout it loud cause it's something that I am PROUD of!

    Show some R E S P E C T
    T C B and SOCK (figuratively please) IT TO ME ....

    Let me know that you see...


    M.E.
    :hearts2:
     
  3. Ankhur

    Ankhur Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    I have learned from recent experiences not to use the terms sister or brother when adressing folks on this board but instead use and will use the term partner,
    because,
    at times we have our own blood,
    who refuse to act with any respect to their parent, to others , business agreements, or the community, and have no intenton to act like a partner to any progress or liberation.

    So from now on out of respect to the Destee family I will use the term partner.

    I sincerly hope not but,
    unfortunatly assume,

    that others here may be going through the same ituation with adult siblings.
     
  4. truetothecause

    truetothecause Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Hotep Partner!

    So it sounds like you SEE others here as "Partners" with you in your quest or journey!? :toast:

    As to the adult siblings...YES..I've worked with my sister for her to SEE ME as a "partner" in this home we share having the same objective of maintaining shelter, the upkeep of it, the investment in it as opposed to it's "her house" and I just "live with her" leaving her the right to throw me out at any given time or threaten me with it...We are PARTNERS in this thing TOGETHER....

    See, with a "brother" or "sister", one we get with an INTIMATE PARTNER, then those "ties that bind" (BLOOD) no longer becomes central or key. It's the INTIMATE PARTNER that we must cleave to.

    Now, in such a times as these, and with our "my", "mine" mentality...we DISRESPECT and disregard each others need to be or rather, don't know how/have the emotional skills to PARTNER with anyone we are not "laying" with.

    M.E.
    :hearts2:
     
  5. Ankhur

    Ankhur Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    That is sad becausewe have seen women side with men have neither dignity, integrity, or a pot to.... in, against theirown children,
    and we have seen men drag their family down for the love of a woman who does not love him or herself.

    Sexual intimacy is the root of life itself,

    but even GeorgeWashington Carver's peanuts and yams, had plants that had shoots and leaves with properities unimagined,
    above and fromthe root!

    however what we have had raped from our collective concious, during the trauma of kidnapping and slavery,
    was a sense of communal, and political intimacy,

    and throughout our post slavery history we have seen our local politicians, and a few community organizers,
    over the decades,
    confuse the 2
     
  6. MsInterpret

    MsInterpret Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    The rules can say respect...But in my heart and mind...These rules only apply if they are deserved in most cases...

    I try to give everyone the benefit of the doubt, but if you disrespect me in ANY way (regardless of age, status, position, etc.) you will most likely lose that respect from me.
     
  7. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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    Thanks for sharing this! :toast:

    Ironically, I just recently spoke on this "When I see you, I don't see color" statement from White people.

    *Oh, you don't see 'color,' huh...Well, I am a BLACK WOMAN and DON'T YOU FORGET IT!* :bam: :lol:
     
  8. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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    Being ‘Colorblind’ Hinders Racial Equality
    By TRACI PEDERSEN Associate News Editor
    Reviewed by John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on October 5, 2010

    De-emphasizing racial differences seems to be the emerging approach for managing racial diversity in schools, business, politics and the law. The hope is that this strategy will lead to tolerance, inclusion and equality.

    However, a new study from the Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University reveals that this strategy can encourage people to turn a blind eye to even obvious displays of racial discrimination and lessen the likelihood for intervention.

    In the study, researchers wanted to know if the ‘colorblind’ approach affected the ability of elementary school students to recognize racially motivated incidents and subsequently report them to adults who could intervene.

    “In many ways, the logic behind colorblindness is understandable,” said Evan P. Apfelbaum, a visiting assistant professor of Management and Organizations at the Kellogg School and head of the study. “Downplaying racial distinctions should limit the potential for bias.”

    Researchers observed the effects of promoting a colorblind approach to diversity among young students, ages 8 to 11. First, students were split into groups to hear different versions of a multimedia storybook. Half received a colorblind version, and the other half received a version that showed diversity as a value.

    In both stories, racial equality was championed, but the colorblind version focused on minimizing race-based distinctions, whereas the value-diversity story encouraged readers to embrace these differences.

    In other words, the colorblind story emphasized a “We need to focus on how we are similar to our neighbors rather than on how we are different” theme versus the value-diversity message of “We want to show everyone that race is important because our racial differences make us special.”

    ...continued here: http://psychcentral.com/news/2010/10/05/being-colorblind-hinders-racial-equality/19114.html