Black People : Professor Dyson defends using the N-word...do you agree with him?

Discussion in 'Black People Open Forum' started by ShemsiEnTehuti, Mar 20, 2007.

  1. ShemsiEnTehuti

    ShemsiEnTehuti Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Professor Dyson defends using the N-word...do you agree with him?


    I will tell you right now, I don't agree with its use in any form, meaning, or capacity.
     
  2. truetothecause

    truetothecause Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    ugh!

    Hotep ShemsiEnTehuti...

    Thank You for the post and the question...
    As I listened, I felt a blow to the gut with the free use of the N word. I, like you, disagree with it's use in relation to US in any way, shape or form.
    He could very well have used the term "African" and "Africans" vs the N word and that would BE my suggestion ro potential solution to him and others who search for an appropriate word to express OUR collective experience(s).

    Thanks again for sharing and allowing me to share. ...
     
  3. KWABENA

    KWABENA STAFF STAFF

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    While I appreciate his "breaking it down," I don't appreciate the use of it. You see, he can say that for himself. Also, he indicated his very own Definitions for "niggg@ and n!ggger," who supports my point.

    1/2 the folks who use the N-word would only be able to understand less than 1/2 of his logic behind the use of the word.

    KD
     
  4. river

    river Watch Her Flow MEMBER

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    I listened to the whole speech and agree with most of what he said. It is unfortunate that he opened the door for the media to take the focus off his message and place it on a word in his message. The message itself was powerful enough that they had to find something.

    I understand that he was not necessarily calling us by that term but using satire to convey how we are perceived and treated by global white supremacy. However, he failed to make that clear and left himself open to criticism.
     
  5. King Tubbs

    King Tubbs Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    I think its obvious hes NOT defending the use of the word, he is using it as a substitute for "oppressed".

    I like other posters hate its use regardless of context, but I see what he was doing and I think its a bit of a stretch to say he was "defending its use".

    But to answer the question, no I dont like his use of it regardless of the fact hes using it to make a point I agree with.
     
  6. ShemsiEnTehuti

    ShemsiEnTehuti Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    He is defending its use. He is trying to make all oppressed people N-words. He thinks it is ok because it he feels it doesn't only apply to us, therefore trying to nullify it as a racist term. The brother is intelligent, but misguided.
     
  7. taaa7

    taaa7 Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    I really do not have a problem with the word or with anyone that uses it. Why should I when it doesn't apply to me? If the word doesn't apply to you, why do you have a problem with it.

    I believe in freedom, and with freedom comes allowing people to do as they choose as long as it doesn't infringe upon your freedom. How does the use of the word infringe upon your freedom?

    I believe it is very childish to allow the use of a word that will not change your life one way or the other to have such a bitter effect on you.

    I give no valitity to the word, therefore it has no affect on me. If one has a problem with the word - it's not the word that is the problem, but the person that is viewing the word has a problem. So you say the "N-word" instead - such childishness. No wonder it was so easy to make slaves of Black folks and so easy to keep them there to this day. Instead of putting all energy into getting and staying free - such energy is wasted on fighting the use of a word that has no bearing on your freedom whatsoever. Grow up. If you want to be free, you must allow others to be free. I can understand if you choose not to use it - that is your choice; that is what freedom is all about - being able and allowed to make choices.

    Liberation begins at home.

    I'll be free, I'll be free,
    And none shall deny,
    With fetters and chains,
    This spirit of mine.......
    By any means necessary

    Peace, Blessings
     
  8. ShemsiEnTehuti

    ShemsiEnTehuti Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Are you totally devoid of the knowledge of your ancestors? The spoken word has a resounding effect, and it is only complacent and ignorant to deny this fact. When we look at so called "Black" television programming or in the media, the men are either musicians, thugs, or athletes. This is the resounding message. Is it a mere coincidence that we have an epidemic of people only focusing on either music, thuggery, or athleticism instead of more constructive and intellectual areas of society?

    Once the N-word went mainstream, it is easy to see what happened to our community in a short 25 years or so. You call it childish to refrain from using the N-word, however, it only calls into question your intellectual maturity on the matter.
     
  9. Metaverse

    Metaverse Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_q8LxO4wnCQ

    The use of the N-word is always subjective. While we may not “use” the word, some of us think the elements and associations that the word implies.

    I agree with Chris Rock when he says there is a civil war going on between Black people and __iggers. It’s very true. You don’t even have to use the word, but many of us sure know how to associate one another.

    What’s the difference between the N-word, Negro, Coon or other names we use for people who we find are not in-line with our “idea” of a Black man or woman?

    In Dyson’s case, he uses the word, like many others as a term of endearment for oppressed people. I don’t agree with this idea either, but it’s a reality.

    This is how “curse” words come into being. Some people find it offensive, some people don’t. The reality is, as long as some people find it offensive- people will use the word.

    Those who find the word offensive are the ones that give the word power and meaning.

    Let us fine everyone $100 everytime they use the N-word and we can collect our reparations that way. These fines should go into a big pot for black businesses, schools, homes and voyages to the Mother land.

    We’d make $800 billion a year easy, wait…we already make that, where does the money go?

    I know this is a very serious issue for us. Our Ancestors are still complaining about it, just think how many of us died hearing that word screamed at us? I am all in favor of creating new words, languages sounds, music, images etc, that reflect us as Artists and Creators, Mothers and Fathers of the Earth.
     
  10. ShemsiEnTehuti

    ShemsiEnTehuti Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    I have always hated when people used the argument that becoming offended to the word gives it power...horse-poo. When you don't get offended to it you have now empowered the force behind its intended use where now the oppressor doesn't even have to use it anymore. The oppressed now becomes a super-slave in all his thought processes. The oppressed now use the word and racist ideology against each other and sees little value in each others lives; taking on the mentality of their oppressor. Not sure if anyone has read the book called Blood on the Leaves by Stetson, but it goes to show that our people don't even see value in their own lives anymore where we will sell crack to our own family, and kill each other senselessly which was unheard of even 50 years ago.

    So what's worse, rightfully being offended by a word that encompasses and resurfaces our historic greivances in the West, or being desensitized to a word yet losing vital cohesiveness in our communities because our people have completely lost a sense a value for Black/African life?
     
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