Black People : Pro Black and Pro Feminist - an oxymoron?

Discussion in 'Black People Open Forum' started by Alexis36, Jan 20, 2006.

  1. Alexis36

    Alexis36 Active Member MEMBER

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    Can a Black man be conscious/ pro black and also strongly believe in gender equality? - I am just finding that so many 'conscious' men seem to be against gender equality and anti-feminist. Any thoughts on this?
     
  2. panafrica

    panafrica Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    There is a difference between believing in gender equality and being a full supporter of the feminist movement. Many people feel that the feminist movement was reckless in setting male & females at odds with each other. However, there is no contradiction in being conscious/pro black and for gender equality. So the answer to your question is: No it isn't a oxymoron to be pro-black and for gender equality. I would consider myself both.
     
  3. Alexis36

    Alexis36 Active Member MEMBER

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    Thanks for your response. I'd like to clarify that when I use the term feminism, I use it in relation to Black women, not the feminist movement so I am talking about Black feminism. Therefore I think that one can be pro feminist/ support the ideals of feminism ie gender equality without supporting a particular feminist movement. I personally don't see how one can be against the concept of feminism (which could be defined as the promotion of gender equality) and support gender equality.
     
  4. Alexis36

    Alexis36 Active Member MEMBER

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    Addendum to original post

    I got this reply from a brother from another forum which I would like people to consider before they reply. Thanks.

    In regards to the stereotypical pro-black brother...those types of black men, similar to extremely religious men, follow a doctrine where the woman is the "supporter" not the "provider". Where as the pro-black brother sees his beautiful black sister as a woman to be loved, honored, cherished and respected... at the end of the day, there are certain things that they see as being expected of her, and there really are no ifs ands or buts about it.

    This brother was basically saying that there were 'pro black' men who supported gender equality but he felt that the stereotypical or 'fiercely' pro black man (who might perhaps belong to an organization) followed a sort of doctrine which was in practice incompatible with gender equality. Any thoughts?
     
  5. Destee

    Destee destee.com STAFF

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    Sister Alexis ... Hello and Welcome ... :wave:

    I must admit that i don't know a lot about the feminist movement, Black or otherwise.

    What is the difference between "Black Feminism" and all others?

    Thanks.

    :heart:

    Destee
     
  6. jamesfrmphilly

    jamesfrmphilly going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    perhaps your idea of conscious is a little skewed. you are too generous. if any man is not respecting the woman then he is not actually conscious and should not be bestowed with that title.

    BTW - welcome to the house :grouphug:
     
  7. Alexis36

    Alexis36 Active Member MEMBER

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    Hi Destee. Thanks for the welcome. :) I don't claim to be a scholar on Black feminism or feminism!....Basically it's my understanding that Black feminism came about as a response to Black women's frustration at being overlooked in both the mainstream feminist movement (by white women) and the Black liberation movement (by black men). Here is an excerpt I've copied from an online encyclopedia:

    The current incarnation of Black Feminism is a political/social movement that grew out of a sense of feelings of discontent with both the Civil Rights Movement and the Feminist Movement of the 1970s. Not only did the Civil Rights Movement primarily focus only on the oppression of black men, but many black women faced severe sexism within Civil Rights groups such as the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee. The Feminist Movement focused on the problems faced by white women. For instance, earning the power to work outside of the home was not an accomplishment for black feminists; they had been working all along. Neither movement confronted the issues that concerned black women specifically. Because of their intersectional position, black women were being systematically disappeared by both movements. Black women began creating theory and developing a new movement which spoke to the combination of problems, sexism, racism, classism, etc., that they had been battling.

    One of the theories that evolved out of this movement was Alice Walker's Womanism. Angela Davis was one of the first people who formed an argument centered on intersectionality; she did this in her book, "Women, Race, and Class." Kimberle Crenshaw, prominent feminist law theorist, gave the idea a name while discussing Identity Politics in her essay, "Mapping the Margins: Intersectionality, Identity Politics and Violence Against Women of Color." Another Feminist theorist is Patricia Hill Collins; much of her work concerns the politics of black feminist thought and oppression. While many of these theorists were beginning their writing, Black Feminist groups were forming. One of these groups is The Combahee River Collective, founded by Barbara Smith; this group's primary goal was "the development of integrated analysis and practice based upon the fact that the major systems of oppression are interlocking."


    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_Feminism
     
  8. Alexis36

    Alexis36 Active Member MEMBER

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    Yeah - I think I am being too generous!.... in any case these men certainly would consider themselves to be part of the consicious movement! It's not even just a question of disrespecting women - it's their attitude that only men can be the leaders/ women have to be in the background that I find depressing.

    Thanks for the welcome. :)
     
  9. jamesfrmphilly

    jamesfrmphilly going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    when they find themselves sitting alone in an all male tree house that attitude may change.
     
  10. Alexis36

    Alexis36 Active Member MEMBER

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    Perhaps :lol: ...but there seem to be many women who are willing to cater to those attitudes...personally I don't think unequal relationships are particularly rewarding - but each to his own!
     
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