Black People : Private Contractors, the new threat to soldiers at war

Discussion in 'Black People Open Forum' started by Ankhur, Nov 10, 2009.

  1. Ankhur

    Ankhur Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Published on Monday, November 9, 2009 by The Nashville Post (Tennessee)
    Soldiers Claim War Zone Contractors Exposed Them to Toxins
    Nashville lawsuit one of several over 'burn pits' in Iraq and Afghanistan alleged to contain dioxin, asbestos and human corpses
    by E. Thomas Wood

    Contractors working for the military in Iraq and Afghanistan are fouling the nests of U.S. soldiers with pollution, poisoning the troops in the very bases meant to be their sanctuaries.

    That's the central allegation in a new set of lawsuits filed in Nashville and elsewhere across the country. The legal actions name as defendants the controversial contracting firm KBR Inc. (formerly Kellogg Brown and Root), as well as Halliburton Co., of which KBR used to be a subsidiary, and a Turkish general contracting firm, ERKA Ltd.

    "These for-profit corporations callously exposed and continue to expose soldiers and others to toxic smoke, ash and fumes," says the complaint filed in Nashville [1] on Friday, which asks for damages on behalf of two Tennessee soldiers. "These exposures are causing a host of serious diseases, increased risk of serious diseases in the future, death and increased risk of death."

    The lawsuit, which seeks class-action status, describes "burn pits" at U.S. bases in both military theaters that contain "every type of waste imaginable." Reading like a postmodern version of Jonathan Swift's Description of a City Shower, the catalog of rubbish in the pits includes:

    "Tires, lithium batteries, Styrofoam, paper, wood, rubber, petroleum-oil-lubricating products, metals, hydraulic fluids, munitions boxes, medical waste, biohazard materials (including human corpses), medical supplies (including those used during smallpox inoculations), paints, solvents, asbestos insulation, items containing pesticides, polyvinyl chloride pipes, animal carcasses, dangerous chemicals, and hundreds of thousands of plastic water bottles."

    "Flames shoot hundreds of feet into the sky" as the huge pits are set ablaze, the Nashville lawsuit claims.

    Noting that "burning plastics emit dioxins, which are known to cause cancer," the complaint accuses the defendants of negligence, battery and inflicting emotional distress. Saying an estimated 100,000 soldiers and contract personnel may have been harmed by the smoke from the pits, the plaintiffs want the court to force KBR and the other companies to cover future medical expenses and pay other compensatory damages.

    It also seeks punitive damages "in an amount sufficient to strip defendants of all of the revenue and profits earned from their pattern of constant, wanton and outrageous misconduct and callous disregard and utter indifference to the welfare of Americans serving and working in Iraq and Afghanistan."

    Attorneys from the Washington D.C. law firm Burke O'Neil LLC brought the Nashville case, with Klint W. Alexander of Wyatt Tarrant & Combs LLP as local counsel.

    They are suing on behalf of Anthony Ray Johnson and David Michael Rohmfeld, both of whom are identified as Tennessee residents. Johnson currently has a mailing address at Ft. Gordon, Ga., headquarters of the Army's Signal Corps, but his past and present military unit affiliations are not given. No such information is available on Rohmfeld, either, but his address is in Clarksville, and he recently identified himself in an online posting as a system analyst and instructor at Westar Aerospace & Defense Group.

    Johnson was stationed at Ft. Caldwell and Camp Bucca in Iraq on two deployments between 2004 and 2008. The complaint says he has asthma, trouble breathing, migraines and a chronic cough.

    Rohmfeld's Army service took him to military bases at Kandahar and Bagram, Afghanistan in 2003. There he was "constantly exposed to the hazardous toxins emitted from the burn pits designed and operated by" KBR and the other defendants, the lawsuit alleges. "As a direct result of his exposure," the complaint continues, "Rohmfeld was diagnosed with asthma and uses two steroid inhalers, as well as a rescue inhaler."

    KBR, Halliburton respond

    At least 22 lawsuits over "burn pits" at US bases have been filed nationwide in the past year. A panel of judges last month consolidated the cases [2] for litigation in Maryland's district court, and its order appears to indicate that newly filed lawsuits will become part of the Maryland case as well. The


    full story;
    http://www.commondreams.org/headline/2009/11/09-4
     
  2. Ishefa

    Ishefa Active Member MEMBER

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    This is how the government avoids the draft in this country, by using our tax money to fund these terrorists. Most Americans don't even know about this. They will know sooner rather than later. When martial law is implemented here, and it will be, they will know them.
     
  3. Ankhur

    Ankhur Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Interview of Zbigniew Brzezinski Le Nouvel Observateur (France), Jan 15-21, 1998, p. 76*

    Q: The former director of the CIA, Robert Gates, stated in his memoirs ["From the Shadows"], that American intelligence services began to aid the Mujahadeen in Afghanistan 6 months before the Soviet intervention. In this period you were the national security adviser to President Carter. You therefore played a role in this affair. Is that correct?

    Brzezinski: Yes. According to the official version of history, CIA aid to the Mujahadeen began during 1980, that is to say, after the Soviet army invaded Afghanistan, 24 Dec 1979. But the reality, secretly guarded until now, is completely otherwise: Indeed, it was July 3, 1979 that President Carter signed the first directive for secret aid to the opponents of the pro-Soviet regime in Kabul. And that very day, I wrote a note to the president in which I explained to him that in my opinion this aid was going to induce a Soviet military intervention.

    Q: Despite this risk, you were an advocate of this covert action. But perhaps you yourself desired this Soviet entry into war and looked to provoke it?

    Brzezinski: It isn't quite that. We didn't push the Russians to intervene, but we knowingly increased the probability that they would.

    Q: When the Soviets justified their intervention by asserting that they intended to fight against a secret involvement of the United States in Afghanistan, people didn't believe them. However, there was a basis of truth. You don't regret anything today?

    Brzezinski: Regret what? That secret operation was an excellent idea. It had the effect of drawing the Russians into the Afghan trap and you want me to regret it? The day that the Soviets officially crossed the border, I wrote to President Carter: We now have the opportunity of giving to the USSR its Vietnam war. Indeed, for almost 10 years, Moscow had to carry on a war unsupportable by the government, a conflict that brought about the demoralization and finally the breakup of the Soviet empire.

    Q: And neither do you regret having supported the Islamic [integrisme], having given arms and advice to future terrorists?

    Brzezinski: What is most important to the history of the world? The Taliban or the collapse of the Soviet empire? Some stirred-up Moslems or the liberation of Central Europe and the end of the cold war?

    Q: Some stirred-up Moslems? But it has been said and repeated: Islamic fundamentalism represents a world menace today.

    Brzezinski: Nonsense! It is said that the West had a global policy in regard to Islam. That is stupid. There isn't a global Islam. Look at Islam in a rational manner and without demagoguery or emotion. It is the leading religion of the world with 1.5 billion followers. But what is there in common among Saudi Arabian fundamentalism, moderate Morocco, Pakistan militarism, Egyptian pro-Western or Central Asian secularism? Nothing more than what unites the Christian countries.

    * There are at least two editions of this magazine; with the perhaps sole exception of the Library of Congress, the version sent to the United States is shorter than the French version, and the Brzezinski interview was not included in the shorter version.

    The above has been translated from the French by Bill Blum author of the indispensible, "Killing Hope: US Military and CIA Interventions Since World War II" and "Rogue State: A Guide to the World's Only Superpower" Portions of the books can be read at: <http://members.aol.com/superogue/homepage.htm>

    more facts about so called terrorism
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ek7ZHenQnu4&feature=related
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VnV_pNe_BB0&feature=related
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kZtbYnslB0o&feature=related

    http://www.bibliotecapleyades.net/sociopolitica/americawarterrorism/americawarterrorism.htm
     
  4. jamesfrmphilly

    jamesfrmphilly going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    they are mercenaries....

    the correct name is mercenaries. follow the money.
     
  5. Ankhur

    Ankhur Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    understandably so but when these young brothers and sisters come back to Phillie battle scared and broke, looking for work and worrying about foreclosure and eviction,

    are you going to call them that to their face?
     
  6. jamesfrmphilly

    jamesfrmphilly going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    so far i have not heard of a broke mercenary, or a black one....
     
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