Black People : POSITIVE DAY IS JUNE 5th

Discussion in 'Black People Open Forum' started by Light, May 20, 2011.

  1. Light

    Light Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2008
    Messages:
    370
    Likes Received:
    128
    Ratings:
    +128
    POSITIVE DAY IS JUNE 5th

    What do you do on positive day?
    Well most of you are already doing it but any how.

    First come to this blog and say happy positive day to every one on the site.

    Next try to stay positive and say positive things to people all day long.

    Next pray or meditate or send out positive vibes to some one you dislike. ohhhhhh toughy.

    Boooooom you just made it through positive day.

    Please tell you friends every were we are going to make this a national thing we do every year make t-shirts tell all your friends, even you stiff upper lip adults tell your children get them happy show them love tell them its positive day be happy do good things. Get your teachers to annouce it tell your co workers call family this is more important.







    Please help any way you can think of.



    Love and Light friends
     
  2. Kamau47

    Kamau47 Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Country:
    United States
    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2005
    Messages:
    1,827
    Likes Received:
    1,297
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    In The Shadows
    Ratings:
    +1,304
  3. Light

    Light Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2008
    Messages:
    370
    Likes Received:
    128
    Ratings:
    +128
    Up until June 5th I will put random messages to hopefully get help from every one to produce positive energy for all people ...

    No matter the religious standpoint or whatever this is something for every one ...


    Much love and light to all...
     
  4. Light

    Light Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2008
    Messages:
    370
    Likes Received:
    128
    Ratings:
    +128
    It is time to take a day off people relax, do what you want this is a day created for you with no agenda's behind it....

    Finally a holiday that you dont have to dress up, or buy anything, or, or, or, or......

    Thatz right it is a day created just for you treat your self special, pat your self on the back for putting up with this world...

    It matterz not your race, cread, gender, religion, sex, or anything...

    Just stop buy here and say hello on june 5th or maybe say happy positive day on the chat area ... just spread it around to family and friendz....

    Itz time for the people of the world to be recognized....

    Much love and light to you all...
     
  5. Light

    Light Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2008
    Messages:
    370
    Likes Received:
    128
    Ratings:
    +128
    I hope that you all have a postive day and talk with each other and show kindness...

    Much love and light to you all...

    Dont forget to drop a line in the Positive Post ....
     
  6. Kamau47

    Kamau47 Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Country:
    United States
    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2005
    Messages:
    1,827
    Likes Received:
    1,297
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    In The Shadows
    Ratings:
    +1,304
    From Wikipedia:

    January 1 New Year's Day Celebrates beginning of the Gregorian calendar year. Festivities include counting down to midnight (12:00 AM) on the preceding night, New Year's Eve. Traditional end of holiday season.
    Third Monday in January Birthday of Martin Luther King, Jr. Honors Martin Luther King, Jr., Civil Rights leader, who was actually born on January 15, 1929; combined with other holidays in several states.
    January 20, the first January 20 following a Presidential election Inauguration Day Observed only by federal government employees in Washington D.C., and the border counties of Maryland and Virginia, in order to relieve congestion that occurs with this major event. Swearing-in of President of the United States and Vice President of the United States. Celebrated every fourth year. Note: Takes place on January 21 if the 20th is a Sunday (although the President is still privately inaugurated on the 20th). If Inauguration Day falls on a Saturday, the preceding Friday is not a Federal Holiday.
    Third Monday in February Washington's Birthday Washington's Birthday was first declared a federal holiday by an 1879 act of Congress. The Uniform Holidays Act, 1968, shifted the date of the commemoration of Washington's Birthday from February 22 to the third Monday in February (between February 15 and 21, meaning the observed holiday never actually falls on Washington's actual birthday). Because of this, combined with the fact that President Abraham Lincoln's birthday falls on February 12, many people now refer to this holiday as "Presidents' Day" and consider it a day honoring all American presidents. However, neither the Uniform Holidays Act nor any subsequent law changed the name of the holiday from Washington's Birthday to Presidents' Day.[1]
    Last Monday in May Memorial Day Honors the nation's war dead from the Civil War onwards; marks the unofficial beginning of the summer season. (traditionally May 30, shifted by the Uniform Holidays Act 1968)
    July 4 Independence Day Celebrates the signing of the Declaration of Independence from British rule, also called the Fourth of July.
    First Monday in September Labor Day Celebrates the achievements of workers and the labor movement; marks the unofficial end of the summer season.
    Second Monday in October Columbus Day Honors Christopher Columbus, traditional discoverer of the Americas. In some areas it is also a celebration of Italian culture and heritage. (traditionally October 12)
    November 11 Veterans Day Honors all veterans of the United States armed forces. It is observed on 11 November to recall the end of World War I on that date in 1918 (major hostilities of World War I were formally ended at the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month of 1918 with the German signing of the Armistice).
    Fourth Thursday in November Thanksgiving Day Traditionally celebrates the giving of thanks for the autumn harvest. Traditionally includes the sharing of a turkey dinner. Traditional start of the holiday season.
    December 25 Christmas
    Traditionally celebrates the birth of Jesus of Nazareth. Many of its celebratory aspects are secular, and it is celebrated by Christians and non-Christians alike.

    February or March, date varies Mardi Gras and Ash Wednesday A festive season (Carnival) leading up to Shrove Tuesday or Mardi Gras. Closes with Ash Wednesday (40 days before Easter, not counting Sundays), which starts the penitential season of Lent in the Christian calendar.
    First Sunday in February Super Bowl Sunday The day of the National Football League's championship, the Super Bowl, which is the top prize in the sport of American football and (since the relocation of the Pro Bowl) the final football game of the season. Festivities generally include in-home parties and watching the game on television with beverages and snacks.
    February 2 Groundhog Day The day on which the behavior of a groundhog emerging from its burrow is said to predict the onset of Spring.
    February 14 Valentine's Day Traditional celebration of love and romance, including the exchange of cards, candy, flowers, and other gifts.
    March 17 Saint Patrick's Day A holiday honoring Saint Patrick that celebrates Irish culture. Primary activity is simply the wearing of green clothing ("wearing o' the green"), although drinking beer dyed green is also popular. Attending St. Patrick's Day parades has historically been more popular in the United States than in Ireland.[citation needed]
    April 1 April Fools' Day A day to play tricks on family, friends, and coworkers, if so inclined. This day used to be the start of the New Year. The tradition started when New Year's Day was moved from April 1 to January 1.
    The Friday before Easter Good Friday Friday of Holy Week, where Christians commemorate the crucifixion and death of Jesus.
    some Sunday in the range March 22 to April 25 (see Computus) Easter Celebrates the resurrection of Jesus. For some Christians, Easter is a day of religious services and the gathering of family. Many Americans follow the tradition of coloring hard-boiled eggs and giving children baskets of candy. On the next day, Easter Monday, the President of the United States holds an annual Easter egg roll on the White House lawn for young children. Not generally observed by most businesses as it always falls on a Sunday. Most financial markets and some other businesses close on the Friday prior, Good Friday (which is a state holiday in many states). Protestant Churches, and the Roman Catholic Church celebrate Easter on a different Sunday (most years) than the Eastern Orthodox churches. April 22 (varies by location and observance) Earth Day A celebration of environmentalism.
    Last Friday in April Arbor Day A day for planting trees.
    May 5 Cinco de Mayo Primarily a celebration of Mexican culture by Mexican-Americans living in the United States. Although this is the anniversary of the victory of the Mexican Army over the French at the Battle of Puebla in 1862, Cinco de Mayo is far more important in the USA than in Mexico itself, often celebrated even by non-Mexican-Americans. Additionally, this "holiday" is often mistaken by Americans as being Mexican Independence Day, which is actually observed on September 16.
    Second Sunday in May Mother's Day Honors mothers and motherhood (made a "Federal Holiday" by Presidential order, although most Federal agencies are already closed on Sundays)
    May 24 Slavic National Holiday in the USA Primarily a celebration of Russian, Ukrainian, Belorussian, etc. culture by Russian-speaking Americans living in the United States.
    June 14 Flag Day Commemorates the adoption of the flag of the United States, in 1777.
    Third Sunday in June Father's Day Honors fathers and fatherhood.
    August 26 Women's Equality Day Celebrates the fight for, and progress towards, equality for women. Established by the United States Congress in 1971 to commemorate two anniversaries: Passage of the Nineteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution ensuring Woman Suffrage in 1920 and a nation-wide demonstration for equal rights, the Women's Strike for Equality, in 1970.
    September 11 Patriot Day Discretionary day of remembrance designated in memory of the 2,977 casualties in the September 11, 2001, attacks.
    September 17 Constitution/Citizenship Day Commemorates the adoption of the Constitution of the United States.
    September or October (depends on Hebrew calendar) Rosh Hashanah Traditional beginning of the Jewish High Holidays. It also celebrates the beginning of a new year on the Hebrew calendar.
    September or October (depends on Hebrew calendar) Yom Kippur Traditional end of and highest of the Jewish High Holidays.
    October 9 Leif Erikson Day A holiday to swim, imitate Vikings, and celebrate that Leif Ericson was the first European to set foot on American soil.
    October 31 Halloween Celebrates All Hallow's Eve, decorations include jack o'lanterns. Costume parties and candy such as candy corn are also part of the holiday. Kids go trick-or-treating to neighbors who give away candy. Not generally observed by businesses.
    First Tuesday after the first Monday in November Election Day Observed by the federal and state governments in applicable years; legal holiday in some states.
    Fourth Friday in November Black Friday The day after Thanksgiving, traditionally the beginning of the Christmas shopping season in the United States. Black Friday is not actually a holiday, but many employers give their employees the day off, increasing the number of potential shoppers.
    December (depends on Hebrew calendar) Hanukkah an eight-day Jewish holiday commemorating the rededication of the Second Temple in Jerusalem at the time of the Maccabean Revolt of the 2nd century BC.
    December 7 Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day Day to mourn the attack on Pearl Harbor by the Japanese on December 7, 1941.
    December 21 Winter Solstice The winter solstice is the day with the least daylight in the Northern Hemisphere.
    December 24 Christmas Eve Day before Christmas Day
    December 26 through January 1 Kwanzaa African American holiday celebration created in 1966 by Dr. Maulana Ron Karenga
    December 31 New Year's Eve
    Final Day of the Gregorian year. Usually accompanied by much celebration.

    Weeks

    • Constitution Week
    • National Flag Week
    • National Forest Products Week
    • National Poison Prevention Week
    • National Safe Boating Week
    • Save Your Vision Week
    Months

    Other

    No offense, as the sentiment is a good & needed one, but just how many more days do we need?
     
Loading...