Jails / Prisons : Political Prisoners/POW's

Discussion in 'Law Forum - Prisons - Gun Ownership' started by oldsoul, Mar 19, 2007.

  1. OldSoul

    OldSoul Permanent Black Man PREMIUM MEMBER

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    This thread is to post info about Political Prisoners, POW's (Prisoners of War),
    Prisoners of Consciousness and others who are imprisoned unjustly.

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    Sundiata Acoli (s/n Clark Squire) # 39794-066
    PO Box 3000
    USP Allenwood
    White Deer, PA 17887
    http://sundiata.afrikan.net/

    Sundiata Acoli, a New Afrikan political prisoner of war, mathematician, and computer analyst, was born January 14, 1937, in Decatur, Texas, and raised in Vernon, Texas. He graduated from Prairie View A & M College of Texas in 1956 with a B.S. in mathematics and for the next 13 years worked for various computer-oriented firms, mostly in the New York area.
    During the summer of 1964 he did voter registration work in Mississippi. In 1968 he joined the Harlem Black Panther Party and did community work around issues of schools, housing, jobs, child care, drugs, and police brutality.
    In 1969 he and 13 others were arrested in the Panther 21 conspiracy case. He was held in jail without bail and on trial for two years before being acquitted, along with all other defendants, by a jury deliberating less than two hours.
    Upon release, FBI intimidation of potential employers shut off all employment possibilities in the computer profession and stepped-up COINTELPRO harassment, surveillance, and provocations soon drove him underground.
    In May 1973, while driving the New Jersey Turnpike, he and his comrades were ambushed by N.J. state troopers. One companion, Zayd Shakur, was killed, another companion, Assata Shakur, was wounded and captured. One state trooper was killed and another wounded, and Sundiata was captured days later.
    After a highly sensationalized and prejudicial trial he was convicted of the death of the state trooper and was sentenced to Trenton State Prison (TSP) for life plus 30 years consecutive.
    Upon entering TSP he was subsequently confined to a new and specially created Management Control Unit (MCU) solely because of his political background. He remained in MCU almost five years, ... let out of the cell only ten minutes a day for showers and two hours twice a week for recreation.
    In September 1979, the International Jurist interviewed Sundiata and subsequently declared him a political prisoner. A few days later prison officials secretly transferred him during the middle of the night to the federal prison system and put him en route to the infamous federal concentration camp at Marion, Illinois, although he had no federal charges or sentences. Marion is one of the highest security prisons in the U.S., also one of the harshest, and there Sundiata was locked down 23 hours a day .... In July 1987 he was transferred to the federal penitentiary at Leavenworth, Kansas.
    In the fall of 1992, Sundiata became eligible for parole. He was not permitted to attend his own parole hearing and was only allowed to participate via telephone from USP Leavenworth. Despite an excellent prison work, academic and disciplinary record, despite numerous job offers in the computer profession, and despite thousands of letters on his behalf, Sundiata was denied parole. Instead, at the conclusion of a 20 minute telephone hearing, he was given a 20-year hit, the longest hit in New Jersey history, which dictates that he must do at least 12 more years before coming up for parole again.
    The Parole Board's stated reason for the 20-year hit was Sundiata's membership in the Black Panther Party and the Black Liberation Army prior to his arrest, the receipt of hundreds of "Free Sundiata" form letters that characterized him as a New Afrikan Prisoner of War, and the feeling that the punitive aspects of his sentence had not been satisfied and that rehabilitation was not sufficiently achieved. The real reason for the 20-year hit is to attempt to force Sundiata to renounce his political beliefs and to proclaim to the world that he was wrong to struggle for the liberation of his people.

    http://sundiata.afrikan.net/
     
  2. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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    THE SEARCH FOR JOHNNY NICHOLAS​

    The Secret of Nazi Prisoner No. 44451


    Jean Marcel Nicholas, or Johnny Nicholas, left a haze of contradictory stories behind him. What's known for certain is that he was born in Haiti in 1918, arrested by the Gestapo in Paris in 1943, and served as a slave laborer and then a doctor in the infamous Dora concentration camp (where Hitler built his V-2 rockets). Wasted by dysentery, infected by tuberculosis contracted from his prisoner patients and wounded trying to escape, Nicholas was rescued by American troops but died of TB three months after the war ended. But what Nicholas led others to believe is another matter. American fighter pilot, French resistance agent, doctor, movie producer—he tried on all of these roles so convincingly that no one, from his family to the Nazis, knew who he really was.
    Troublemaker, hero, fool, the man is a mystery—a mystery now elucidated by journalists Hugh Wray McCann and David C. Smith. Readers of Holocaust and African diaspora studies will welcome The Search for Johnny Nicholas (a revision of a work published to limited UK release in 1982) for investigating a small but fascinating corner of history.
    In a twisting narrative written in an almost thriller-like style, McCann and Smith weave between Nicholas's troubled Haitian adolescence, his brief adventures in the pre-war cosmopolitan high life, and his concentration camp ordeal....

     
  3. Ankhur

    Ankhur Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    I never bought that double talk!!!

    1 Why expect anything fair in a war?
    2 Why expect fair play in a revolution?
    3 Why telegraph ones punches in a fight?
    4 What guerilla urban warrior, in any revolution in world history, ever expected fair treatment from their captor?
    5 If you know your history here for 400 years who in the hell would expect fair play from a white supremist oligarchy, when one openly espouses armed rebellion, and lets their oponent know every thing they are doing?
     
  4. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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    Hitler's Black Victims: The Historical Experiences of Afro-Germans, European Blacks, Africans and African Americans in the Nazi Era

    By Clarence Lusane

    Valaida Snow

    Evelyn Anderson Hayman

    Arthur Briggs

    Maceo Jefferson

    Armand Huss (Johnny Williams)

    Bayume Muhammed Hussein (aka Mohamed Husen)

    Jean "Johnny" Voste

    Josef Nassy

    continued here: http://books.google.com/books?id=5b...&resnum=6&ved=0CD0Q6AEwBQ#v=onepage&q&f=false


     
  5. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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    Léopold Sédar Senghor (9 October 1906 – 20 December 2001) was a Senegalese poet, politician, and cultural theorist who for two decades served as the first president of Senegal(1960–1980). Senghor was the first African elected as a member of the Académie française. Before independence, he founded the political party called the Senegalese Democratic Bloc. He is regarded by many as one of the most important African intellectuals of the 20th century....
    [​IMG]

    Léopold Sédar Senghor (9 October 1906 – 20 December 2001) was a Senegalese poet, politician, and cultural theorist who for two decades served as the first president of Senegal(1960–1980). Senghor was the first African elected as a member of the Académie française. Before independence, he founded the political party called the Senegalese Democratic Bloc. He is regarded by many as one of the most important African intellectuals of the 20th century....

    ...In 1939, Senghor was enrolled as a French army enlisted man (2ème Classe) with the rank of private within the 59th Colonial Infantry division in spite of his higher education and his later acquisition of the French Citizenship in 1932. A year later, during the German invasion of France, he was taken prisoner by the Germans in la Charité-sur-Loire. He was interned in different camps, and finally at Front Stalag 230, in Poitiers. Front Stalag 230 was reserved for colonial troops captured during the war. German soldiers wanted to execute him and the others the same day they were captured, but they escaped this fate by yelling Vive la France, vive l'Afrique noire! ("Long live France, long live Black Africa!") A French officer told the soldiers that executing the African prisoners would dishonour the Aryan race and the German Army. In total, Senghor spent two years in different prison camps, where he spent most of his time writing poems. In 1942 he was released for medical reasons.[23]
    He resumed his teaching career while remaining involved in the resistance during the Nazi occupation...

    ...http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/L%C3%A9opold_S%C3%A9dar_Senghor
     
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