Black History Culture : Plymouth Rock

Discussion in 'Black History - Culture - Panafricanism' started by cherryblossom, Aug 21, 2010.

  1. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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    http://youtu.be/xDXPpfGAZrU


    "We are Africans, and we happen to be in America. We are not Americans. We are a people who formerly were Africans who were kidnaped and brought to America. Our forefathers weren't the Pilgrims. We didn't land on Plymouth Rock; the rock was landed on us. We were brought here against our will; we were not brought here to be made citizens. We were not brought here to enjoy the constitutional gifts that they speak so beautifully about today. Because we weren't brought here to be made citizens--today, now that we've become awakened to some degree, and we begin to ask for those things which they say are supposedly for all Americans, they look upon us with a hostility and unfriendliness." - Malcolm X
     
  2. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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    ...The African arrival in late August 1619 (a year before the Pilgrims' arrival at Plymouth, Massachusetts on the Mayflower) was not accidental. Tobacco required heavy backbreaking labor--labor white men were deemed unable to provide. In April 1619 a Dutch ship and an English ship, Treasurer, ostensibly sent by the colony's governor on a routine trading voyage, were actually privateers on their way to raid Spanish shipping. During their joint voyage the two heavily armed vessels captured a Spanish slave ship and its cargo of nearly one hundred African slaves. The Dutch ship immediately returned to Old Point Comfort near Jamestown. Colonist John Rolfe's letter of January 1620 reported the arrival "about the latter end of August . . . of 20 and odd Negroes." The Dutch mostly sold the Africans to Governor Sir George Yeardley and the colony's wealthiest resident, a merchant named Abraham Peirsey. Smaller vessels from Old Point Comfort smuggled the Africans to Jamestown where some were sold as slaves and luckier ones as indentured servants. Shortly afterwards the Treasurer arrived and dropped off an African slave woman named Angela (the first African-Virginian whose name we know) and set sail for Bermuda with twenty-nine other Africans. Over the next three years English ships brought more Africans to Jamestown. Such was the birth of the transAtlantic slave trade by means of a Dutch ship whose name history has forgotten, a group of unfortunate West Africans stolen and sold at least three times during the horrors of the Middle Passage, and a colony willing to try anything to secure cheap labor....

    http://www.teach.virginia.edu/socialstudies/projects/jvc/overview.html
     
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