Black People : PBS, NPR, serving the Corporate Oligarchy

Discussion in 'Black People Open Forum' started by Ankhur, Oct 22, 2010.

  1. Ankhur

    Ankhur Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    I remember a show on channel 13 as a child called SOUL hosted by Ellis Haslip, back in the 60s, and Black Journal with Tony Brown.

    The fascinating thing about Brown wasthat he hosted a symposium that included,
    Ron Karenga, Floyd McCissik, James Farmer, Nathan Hare, Representatives from the Black Panther party,
    and a special teleprompter communication set up from Chicago, so that I was actaully able to hear the Honorable Elijah Muhammed for the first time.

    Soul, was a Black variety show that allowed a broad cross section of Black culture and uplftment to be seen .
    Aretha was there at times, McCoy Tyner, Junior Walker, Joe Tex,

    Dr Barabara Ann Teer and the Black Theater movement, Pharoah Sanders played hishert out while Leon Thomas riffed to Imamu Baracka's poetry about a glorious Black future.
    It was the first time I saw Minister Farakhan on television along with many of the FOI who ran many wonderful businesses and establishments throughout Bed Stuy, and East New York,
    There were regular presentations of independent Black films, on PBS
    groudbreaking and sincere documentaries on the Black Panther Party for Self Defense, and Malcolm X , regular Jazz presentations,
    specials on Africa, and almost every month there was some form of African dance and music presentation,
    Sister CharrityBailey with her childrens program of folks songs and African and Black American fables ad folk stories

    and this thing called
    Sesame Street,
    Frank Oz was an old school 60s white liberal and the entire staff was Hispanic Black and white equaly, and many prominent Black celebrities who had been active in the 60s assited and did cameos as well

    there was also real no nonsense journalism on PBS as well,


    but all of that came to an end when PBS sold out to the corporations and allowed commercial advertizing, in fact the companies supporting rightwing neocon interests weazled their way in.

    NPR was the first to give air time to Malcolm X, Kwame Toure, Ed Bullins, Nicki Giovanni, Sonia Sanchez, Angela Davis,

    but now the situation has changed and as Percy Sutton's children learned the hard way that white liberals can be racist too, after selling WWRL,
    to Air America

    many Black folks realized that all though commercial free in each state, Pacifica had and still has some really white supremist and corporate leanings ad attitudes that have hampered WBAI for the past 10 years

    they are going through elections now and listen to what the brothers and sisters there have to say about the present conditions,
    after the deaths of John Harris, Samori Marksman, Gary Null leaving and the firing of Bernard White

    we need our own!
     
  2. chuck

    chuck Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    The Puppets:

    The Puppetmasters...

    Nothing new or news about that either!

    Pun not intended...

    :10500:

     
  3. chuck

    chuck Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    On the other hand:

    There were and are progressive and reactionary elements via any public or private institution...

    Some are merely defenders of the status quo...

    Others we either call investigate reporters or whistle blowers...

    I'll just leave it at that...

    :em0200:
     
  4. Destee

    Destee destee.com STAFF

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    PBS, NPR, serving the Corporate Oligarchy

    Brother Ankhur ... aren't you ... and most everyone ... serving the Corporate Oligarchy?

    If so, I'm not understanding the point ... can you help me understand?

    I've not even read what is inside the thread, because the title seems to point fingers at PBS and NPR, for doing the same as you, me, and most.

    Are you suggesting that it is not okay for PBS and NPR to serve the corporate oligarchy, but it is okay for you?

    Wassup. Help me understand the title please, so I can get to the stuff on the inside.

    Thanks in advance.

    :heart:

    Destee
     
  5. Ankhur

    Ankhur Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    you don't know me, what are you accusing me of?
     
  6. Ankhur

    Ankhur Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    no there is a difference, back then it was non commercial television ad now it is not

    and there have been numerous Bill Moyers videos that have expressed the colonization, effect on news coverage and amount of cultural enrichment on PBS
     
  7. Destee

    Destee destee.com STAFF

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    I didn't accuse you of anything.

    I told you that I am of the opinion that most, if not all of us, serve the Corporate Oligarchy in some way, form, or fashion.

    I asked you, are you suggesting that you or someone you know, does not serve the Corporate Oligarchy ... which would explain your criticism of those that do.

    I asked you, and accused you of nothing.

    I asked ... and it appears ... i'll be wait'n a while for the answer ... :pc:

    :heart:

    Destee
     
  8. Ankhur

    Ankhur Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    First of all I have never worked for any corporation and have been either self employed or employed by our tax dollars and the dollars of the citizens of NYC.

    Purchasing products from corporations means doing business, serving their interests means espousing corporate and neocon avaricious ideology in words and actions

    3rd there are three posts here that talk about PBS started concerns, and one on NPR , therefore it would be of service to present some background info that may have lead to the various incidents mentioned

    PBS was supposed to be non commercial, when it was there was enrichment for everyone especiually for us, now there is not, since there are commercial advertizing.

    4 why ask me out of all the various posts here with all sorts of titles to explain mine without reading the subject matter of the post?
    did I violate some rule?
     
  9. Destee

    Destee destee.com STAFF

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    Brother Ankhur ... i''m jes take'n part in da discussion ... dang ... relax.

    Did you answer my question? It was a yes or no question. I think you did, saying you do not serve the corporate oligarchy.

    I would challenge you on that, but it doesn't appear you can take a challenge from me ... so i'll leave you alone. Carry on.

    Much Love and Peace.

    :heart:

    Destee
     
  10. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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    History: Ellis Haizlip and Soul!


    It’s 1973. An impressively-dressed Ashford & Simpson launch into “Keep It Comin’,” a radiant soul song about the sustaining power of love. As she sings, Simpson raises her arm above her head, the gesture simultaneously a nod to the rhythm and a revolutionary salute. Both she and Ashford are beaming. As the camera pans back from the singers, it becomes apparent that so, too, is the audience. Heads keep time, feet tap gently; the room is softly alive and buzzing, the massed bodies a single unit, riding the song’s unifying and sustaining groove. “Keep it comin. Keep it comin.’”

    The warmth and celebratory air of the “Ashford and Simpson” episode was a hallmark of Soul!. From its September 1968 debut to the final episodes in 1973, Soul! provided a stage for a breathtaking array of black cultural and political luminaries, including many performers who had never before appeared on TV. It did so, moreover, in a variety-show format that mixed “high” culture with “low,” well-known names like Sidney Poitier with (then) up-and-coming figures like Stevie Wonder and poet Nikki Giovanni. Most importantly, Soul! was unapologetic about aiming its diverse and self-critical weekly affirmation of black culture and politics to African American viewers, a group that had previously not had the pleasure of seeing itself widely, or truthfully, represented on television.

    Soul! was the brainchild of Ellis Haizlip, the first black producer at WNET (then WNDT), who joined the station in the mid-60s. Haizlip was approached by Christopher Lukas, the station’s white director of cultural programming, with the idea of launching an arts program for black audiences. Haizlip developed the notion of a program that would use the variety-show format (familiar from commercial fare such as The Ed Sullivan Show) to display the breadth and variety of black culture. Soul!’s mission would be not merely to entertain African American viewers, but to challenge them to ponder the possible meanings of black culture and black community at a time when African Americans were driving American social transformation.

    Initial funding for Soul! came from a combination of public and private sources, including a start-up grant from the Ford Foundation. With money in place, Haizlip pulled together a creative team of camera operators, set designers, and producers, the majority African Americans. (As a ‘first’ himself, Haizlip never forgot the entrenched discrimination he had experienced working in New York theater and television.) Alice Hille, Soul!’s first associate producer, and one of the first black women to hold such a position, became Haizlip’s close collaborator and, through her connections to Harlem’s Apollo Theater, his link to the rhythm-and-blues world.

    Soul! bore the stamp of Haizlip’s visionary leadership, impeccable taste, and skill as a social connector. A product of segregated Washington DC, Haizlip had witnessed contralto Marian Anderson’s legendary 1939 concert on the steps on the Lincoln Memorial. For him, opera singers, funk musicians, lyrical poets, and political revolutionaries were equal participants in the black cultural project. Haizlip’s philosophy was “it’s all our culture,” recalls actor Anna Maria Horsford, who worked as an associate producer at Soul! “It was a celebration. Look what we’ve produced in spite of.”

    Perhaps more than any other television show before–or since–Soul! insisted on representing the heterogeneity of black culture. It embraced cultural nationalists, Muslims, and feminists–occasionally on the same show. It flouted the conventional wisdom that ballet dancers and blues singers could not share a stage, let alone an audience. In addition to championing emerging acts, such as Ashford and Simpson (who appeared on the show before they even had their first LP out), Soul! embraced radical and challenging improvisatory music from multi-instrumentalist Rahsaan Roland Kirk, jazz drummer Max Roach, and the genre-defying Last Poets.

    Soul! also gave artists a chance to go beyond their usual roles (on Soul!, singers might conduct interviews), and relished the unexpected juxtaposition. Among the most intriguing Soul! pairings: Bill Withers, the hit-making singer-songwriter, with poet Mae Jackson; Jesse Jackson (then best known for his work with PUSH) with former Raelette (Ray Charles’ backup singer) Merry Clayton; Toni Morrison, recent author of The Bluest Eye, with Junior Walker and His All-Stars; Louis Farrakhan with musicians Mongo Santamaria and the Delfonics; Jerry Butler with Muhammad Ali. (See episode list)

    Designed by Chris Thee in its first season, the set of Soul! sent a powerful message. It “imagined the dawn of a new world—fiery orange sunbursts were projected on electric blue backdrops,” according to cultural critic Lisa Jones. “Abstract sculpture served as scenery. Interviews were shot from unexpected angles and the editing style was up-to-date psychedelic—lots of dissolves and superimpositions.”

    Unlike programs such as The Tonight Show, Soul! was “taped as live,” which allowed its camera operators to capture the un-teleprompted reactions of a modest studio audience made of local New Yorkers. Indeed, in making the audience part of the spectacle, Haizlip brought to television the aesthetic principles he had imbibed in the churches of his youth, and he was able to represent black music as a conversation between musicians and audiences. As Haizlip explained, the goal was for the audience to appear “in relationship to a performance that [they are] enjoying as opposed to a performance that is being presented for [them].” In this way, a viewer might “catch the flavor of people interreacting. Some sort of exchange was going on.”

    In addition to working behind the scenes, Haizlip put himself on camera, appearing as a frequent host and interviewer. Always sharply-dressed, sporting a mid-length Afro and “serious” glasses, he crafted an unusual, unassuming on-stage persona. He conducted interviews with intense interest, pushing conversations as far as they could go, all while never hogging the microphone. This laid-back style attracted notable, reticent figures: activist (and former SNCC leader) Stokely Carmichael, the writer Chester Himes, and black Muslim leader Louis Farrakhan all accepted Haizlip’s invitation to appear on the show.

    In 1973, Soul ran out of funding, but the reason wasn’t popularity. From the beginning, critical reviews of the show had been strong, and Soul! had been quick to develop a following, first locally in New York, then nationally when the Corporation for Public Broadcasting picked the show up for syndication. “I feel this show is a part of me and represents what we the black people stand for—PROGRESS!”, wrote one viewer from Fort Tilden, New York.

    As the 1960s gave way to the ’70s, Haizlip and others at Soul! came under increasing pressure to tamp down the show’s message of black pride. From the beginning, Soul! had to fight for its survival. For a time after the first season ended in 1969, Soul! aired in repeats while Christopher Lukas courted Mobil Oil Corporation. (The corporation was on the verge of giving the station money for Soul! until it decided to fund a new show called Masterpiece Theatre). In 1970, with viewers pleading for the show to stay on the air, a three-year, $3.5 million grant from the Ford Foundation saved Soul!.

    But the January 1969 transfer of presidential power from Lyndon Johnson–whose administration had created PBS–to Richard Nixon meant a new set of priorities for public broadcasting. By the end of 1972, CPB officials had deemed black shows such as Soul! hindrances to racial progress. Haizlip was given a choice: integrate Soul! or see it cancelled. The last episode aired on March 7, 1973....



    http://www.thirteen.org/soul/about-soul/host-ellis-haizlip-andsoul-history/
     
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