Black People : Over-representation of the Akan and Yoruba cultures in the Conscious Community

Discussion in 'Black People Open Forum' started by Onyemobi, Sep 9, 2011.

  1. Onyemobi

    Onyemobi Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Just about all the evidence that I have seen, in the form of books, DNA, and existing cultural practices points to the overwhelming majority of Africans in America being descended from Bantu speaking nations like Cameroon, Angola and Congo. So if that is the case, why are so many people taking on Akan and Yoruba names and traditions and ignoring the others? Maybe because Ghana and Nigeria are English speaking countries and the others are not....
     
  2. Blaklioness

    Blaklioness Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    What ought to baffle people more is the fixation on Egypt. To answer your question, you are dealing with folks who were not only cut off from the cultures but also interethnically "mixed" with all those cultures. My guess is that since our (black) racial identity outweighs the cultural identities, we have often just adopted anything (culture-wise) affiliated with Black people--especially if information is readily available on it for extensive study. It is not really a bad thing because, like I indicated, race is the tie that binds; however, what I really hope we would start doing is truly ANALYZING those ancient cultural practices for their inherent strengths AND weaknesses instead of blindly glorifying them---it would teach us what to and what not to do.

     
  3. Onyemobi

    Onyemobi Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    LOL! It seems as though people go with whatever is popular. Rather than researching their own family tree, they just run into whatever is the most available, which happen to be the Akan and Yoruba traditions at the moment.
     
  4. jamesfrmphilly

    jamesfrmphilly going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    so what is wrong wit that? if you got information that may be helpful why not just share it? no need to critique others.
     
  5. Onyemobi

    Onyemobi Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    I'm just pointing out an observation. If we were in a French speaking nation, the Mandika, Kongo and Dogon traditions would most likely be just as popular as the Yoruba and the Akan ones. ATR in America is geo-political. If folks really wanna get back to their roots, start with a family tree.
     
  6. jamesfrmphilly

    jamesfrmphilly going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    you start wit a family tree. i'm happy wit kamit.
     
  7. Onyemobi

    Onyemobi Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Have fun with that! Are your kids into it as well?
     
  8. RAPTOR

    RAPTOR Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Legitimately or not, people throughout history has moved from 'old god/s' to 'new god/s' whenever it suited
    their interest and or needs. All abrahamic faiths have, more or less, a 'popular' appeal also. Abrahamic faiths are not excluded from said phenomena, for the past 1900 or more, years -when have they not been 'popular'?

    The same could be said to the multitudes beholding to abrahamic faiths. Because our community has an abysmal knowledge of ourstory in general, it is little surprise that there are those who do not know, nor care, to research their own family tree. From what I've learned in my studies and conversations with practitioners of akan/yoruba spiritual systems, knowing ones own family history is an essential part of these systems, which may compel folks to talk to grandma/pa or uncle/aunt about the who, what, when, where and why of their family past.

    Another thought:

    Could it be that this increase in interest of akan/yoruba belief systems may
    suggest that afrikans in america are searching for something, not provided by
    other faiths? Hustlerism notwithstanding.

    You seem to be inferring that a number of folks are going about it
    the wrong way and I don't doubt that. The same can be said about
    folks venturing into other faiths. But this is the deal; abrahamic
    institutions do not turn away those who aren't 'going about it'
    in the 'right' way. They are, first, are pleased that folks wanna be
    a part of their institution and see that as a start on "the right
    path". Growing pains, religious or otherwise, is a virtually
    unavoidable process.

    Perhaps it is some sort of 'awakening' though not totally
    awake. That the 'grogginess' is the early manifestation of some
    not going about in a just/legitimate manner.
     
  9. maf

    maf On a marvelous journey. MEMBER

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    I think it is difficult to trace a family tree out for most of us here. I can go up maybe 2 generations and the details are sketchy at best. It would be nice to pinpoint my exact origin in the motherland but just looking at the right continent is a great start IMO.
     
  10. Sen - Res

    Sen - Res Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Sister Blacklioness, I agree with everything you've said. I have research my family tree, from my Father's side I am Yoruba,& from my Mother's side I am Cameroonian,to be exact I am from the Bamilike tribe of Cameroon. P.S. I don't know how true this Information is, but the Cameroonians of the Bamilike tribe says they come from Kamit.
     
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