Pan Africanism : OUT OF AFRICA

Discussion in 'Black History - Culture - Panafricanism' started by Isaiah, Sep 15, 2004.

  1. Isaiah

    Isaiah Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    http://www.thestranger.com/2001-07-12/feature.html

    Young African immigrants must choose between being African or African American. Their parents pull in one direction and their peers pull in another.

    The bus that runs up and down Rainier Avenue carries two types of East African youths. The first type is distinguished by their traditional clothes and Islamic politeness and diffidence. They never speak loudly, and are always found near the front of the bus for either safety or propriety's sake. Then there's the second, newer type of East African youth. This type always sits deep in the back of the bus, decked out in FUBU, Johnny Blaze, Ecko, and Mecca with sneakers as thick as Neil Armstrong's moon shoes. In the winter they wear puffy space jackets, their ears sealed in bulging Sony headphones. In the summer, they wear NBA vests and long, baggy shorts or white undershirts with polka-dot boxer shorts puffing out of their sagging "raw denim" pants. If they are girls, they have colorful nails done up at Hollywood Nails; if they are boys, they have tight braids or do-rags, and no amount of scrutiny can separate them from African Americans. Only when they speak is the truth revealed.

    "I can always tell the difference between the two right away," Dinknesh says to me in the library of her high school. She came to Seattle in 1999 from Ethiopia, and though her accent is thick, she has a steady command of English. "If I go to the mall," Dinknesh says confidently, "I can tell who is African American and who is African. For some people it's not easy, but I know the difference."

    I explain to her that I can never tell them apart, especially with the East African youth. If they come from Nigeria or Zimbabwe or Zaire, I know right away they are African, and not because their features are more recognizable (more Bantu, as an ethnologist might bluntly put it), but because they always get the codes wrong or messed up. They are either a year behind the trends or their pants aren't sagging in the proper, lackadaisical manner, or worse still, and I have seen this several times, they are wearing a generic version of Tommy Hilfiger--a brand name that's already a thing of the past for African American youth.

    "I can understand how you might not tell the difference with the [Ethiopian] boys; they are harder [to distinguish]. But the African girls, you can tell right away," Dinknesh says.

    FOR THE REST OF THIS ARTICLE, REFER TO THE WEB ADDRESS ABOVE...

    Peace!
    Isaiah
     
  2. Pharaoh Jahil

    Pharaoh Jahil Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Peace,



    Interesting article. I've also notice this in Los Angeles.
     
  3. NNQueen

    NNQueen going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Americanism is like a disease isn't it?

    This thread reminds me of another one Destee started recently asking the question is imitation a form of flattery!

    From what I've read in this article, I would have to reply with a resounding NO!!
     
  4. Isaiah

    Isaiah Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Queenie, did you catch the attitude of some of the African parents toward African Americans???(smile!) They sound mo' redneck than the rednecks themselves... Makes you wonder who is teaching these people these things??? Or are they just Self-Taught???

    Peace!
    Isaiah
     
  5. PurpleMoons

    PurpleMoons Administrator STAFF

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    OUCH! That hurts! Its not hard to see who is getting the worst rep in america. With all the negative publicity we receive from the media. With the high crimes that are allowed to presist in our neighborhoods. With lack of information we receive about our Brothers and Sisters in other lands.

    If I was comming from a different part of the world, I too might have concerns about others who look like me but is scrutinize and held mostly responsible for all the negative deeds that go on here in america.

    They see how hard it is for black people here and don't want to get caught up in the stereotype ish. But on the other hand they are trying to separate themselves from us. Dividing the unity we will both need to to take our stand here.

    This is so sad and disappointing. They speak as if all African American people are this way. I can't recall a time when I looked at a native born African and thought less of them. I had two friends who was from Africa when I was growing up. One was name Gladys and the other was name Zachary.

    Although they did'nt speak any english at the time, it never stopped me from getting to know them. I never view them as different from I other than they couldn't speak english. While their are some trying to bridge the gaps here in america between Africans and African America, it seems the gaps keep getting wider and wider.

    How disappointing~ :kick:
     
  6. MrBlak

    MrBlak Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    I'm gonna speak my peice and leave.

    This is ALL immigrant groups regardless of race. They fear losing their ID and dont want their kids to asimilate into the closest group to who they are.

    Immigrant parents and all parents do this thing where they have certain groups they dont want their kids to mix with. It is sad but true and African Americans are no different.

    Lastly....I know your mama told you this before....it takes 2 to fight and you know there is an equal if not larger nuber of american blacks with ignorant attitudes towards africans as there are africans with those attitudes towards yall. To act innocent and all hurt is ridiculous...this battle has been fought for a long time and for any of the sides (more than 2 if you didnt know) to act like anything said to or about them is an attack on the innocent is ridiculous.

    More important than acting surprized at the same old same old, is to find a solution. Anyone got any??
     
  7. Isaiah

    Isaiah Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Mr. Blak, my parents NEVER told me not to mix with African Caribbean children, they never told me not to mix with Latino children, they never told me not to mix with White Children, or any other kind of children... They never told me they didn't want West Indians darkening their doorsteps based on their West Indianess, and one of the reasons among many that this did not happen was because my parents came out of a society in which they were constantly told they could not mix with any but their own kind, and drink from water fountains with their own kind's label on it... They found that very repulsive, and a continuation of the same kind of garbage they were subjected to in their hometowns...

    But on a more practical level, these immigrants always wound up in the neighborhoods where African Americans lived, and attended the schools and churches in the neighborhoods where African Americans lived... They played ball in the neighborhoods where African Americans lived, and hung out in the clubs where African Americans lived... In short, there was, and is, a greater integration of these immigrants with African Americans than either they, or White America wants, apparently... So, Mr. Blak, don't get it twisted, my brother... Having grown up in New York City, I know this article is only presenting the tip of the iceberg, and I done seen it all, man... No, Black Man, I am not surprised by what I read in that article, because as a child growing up, I remember a Trinidadian family who lived in my building, and who's son was my friend, sending me home when they set the dinner table(LOL!) It was not that way in my household... My mama let me starve while she fed my friends, sun...(LOL!)

    You are right, the clashes of cultures are inevitable, and children, thank God, mostly stay above this garbage foisted upon them by their dumb-assed parents... The second generation always does the exact opposite of what their dumb parents advocate, and that's why we, now, live in a world where HipHop pervades - because second-generation West Indians, like Grand Master Flash, Chubb Rock, Afrika Bambaataa, Doug E. Fresh, and a zillion other brothers and sisters(MC Lyte and Foxy Brown)heard the call of their parents cultures, but also the larger African American community... It's all good, Mr. Blak(smile!)

    By the same token, brother, I know that as you are telling African Americans NOT to be hurt, you are hurt by the very same things - because you care... Surely, there are some African Americans who are hurt, and some who take these things to heart more than others, but it is because they care, just as you do... Me, I am laughing at some of what I read in that article, because I know that the children of that African immigrant are African Americans whether that African parent understands that or not... Once you move away from the South, from the Caribbean, from Africa, into the Northern and Western Cities of North America, your children will fit into the environment into which they are born, as surely as those parents fit into the environment in which they were born... I know, Mr. Blak, as the child of Black Southerners, that this is what happens, my brother... Sure, I borrowed much from my parents, but I aint my parents, I am me, a Black Northerner, and Black New Yorker - period... HUMAN NATURE, Mr. BlaK - makes me wanna howl with laughter at the silliness of it all...(LOL!)

    So, don't be jumpin' on your brothers and sisters, Mr. Blak... We're just human, and yeah, we are guilty of being some prejudiced mofo's, man... No doubt!!! I've heard African Americans express some of most ignorant racist, Black Supremacist nonsense, but what do you expect??? We have learned our lessons well, from the greatest Racists and White Supremacists the world has ever known... Be patient, God is not Through with us yet(LOL!)

    Peace!
    Isaiah
     
  8. Sangofa

    Sangofa Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    :explode: I am very upset and lost for words. The article is shameful. :whip: Do they think that they are better?
     
  9. toylin

    toylin Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Just another one of those things, I guess. I am saddened by the mere thought that we "don't like" each other. I have a friend in college. Her family was from Nigeria. You didn't know she was African until you started talking to her (she spoke Ebo). I spent Thanksgiving with her family because I couldn't afford to fly home. They welcomed me with open arms, and insisted on me eating first, bathing first, etc. all because I was a guest in their home. I also have had several African friends over the years.... Their grandparents are usually the ones that warn them away from "amerikan" traditions, but their parents usually push them to embrace it.
     
  10. Sangofa

    Sangofa Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    :gas: You know I am getting mixed messages. The other day I talked to a Nigerian who happens to Yoruba. I asked him a little but about Nigeria and also the Yoruba tribe. I told him that part of my ancestry is in Ghana. He told me that I didn't look like I have Ghanian ancestry. He told me that my features proves that I have Nigerian ancestry. He told me that I should go visit. I told him that I don't think that I can do that. He asked me why and I was honest with him. I plainly told him that I'm afraid to fly and the fear that the people of Africa don't like Black Americans. He told me that it's not true that Africans Nigerians in particular like Black Americans. He said that if I go I would be welcomed and would blend in. He said the only way that the people would find out that I am American is when I talk. I asked him even though Black Americans have a mixture of other ancestries are we still seen as African by the Africans and he said yes. By reading the article I'm getting another impression. :thinking:

    www.nigeriansinamerica.com Some of comments that I read in the article is what I read in this website. If you click on the message board and then click on Nigerian Life In The Diaspora there is a topic called The Best U.S. State for Nigerians. Some of the things that I read in that article I read in that particular thread. I am confused on whether or not Black Americans are like in Africa.
     
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