African Traditional Religion : Orisha's ebos and days

Discussion in 'African Traditional Religion Study Group' started by Tribal_House, Jun 6, 2009.

  1. Tribal_House

    Tribal_House Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    ebos for osun
    loves honey; fond of light-colored fruits, wines, beer, rum or gin; hens, guinea, hen, quail, and male and female goats are here blood offerings; candies, cakes, flowers, mirrors, kola nuts, red palm oil, coconuts, cowrie shells are also acceptable
    her day is friday

    ebos for oya
    eggplants are a fav; as many as nine may be offered at once depending on circumstances; loves rum, gin, beer, wine, dark fruit like plums and red/purple grapes; palm oil, kola nuts, coconuts are suitable offerings as well; nine colored ribbons, old fashioned pinwheel toys are excellent; hen and female goat may be offered depending on the aspect of the warrior orisha you call
    her day is wednesday

    ebos for yemonja/olukun
    fruits, particularly red and purple grapes, melons, squash, beer, gin, rum, candy and cakes are staple offerings; watermelon is a fav; palm oil, kola nuts, coral, flowers used as well; sheep, guinea, fowl, hens, pigeons, raw or cooked fish, palm wine are also acceptable
    her/his day is monday

    ebos to obatala
    cool water, coconuts, milk, honey, shea butter, rice, mild cigars, bread, cookie are acceptable; snails preferably large african snails; kola nuts; liquor is NEVER to be offered; white doves, but blood is never placed on the stones of obatala; NOT offered palm oil
    his day is sunday

    ebos to ogun
    likes all things hot and spicy; peppers in any form, highly spiced foods, 151-proof rum, gin or vodka, black or dark cigars, red palm oil, and once in a while honey is suitable; rooster and male goat are also offered
    his day is tuesday

    ebos for esu
    enjoys highly spiced foods; chili peppers, peppercorns, and jalapenos all suitable offerings, strong cigar, rum, gin or beer ar highly favored by him; red palm oil poured on esu or in front of his image; pigeon, rooster, and male goat are all offer to esu.
     
  2. awo dino

    awo dino Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    The Yoruba use a four day week. every four days we celebrate Ose Ifa (Ifa worship day). The seven day week, with certain Orisas being worshipped on certain days, is an adaptation to the seven day week. It is used in Santeria, for instance. One can do as one pleases, but it is good to make a decision based on complete information. The Ose Ifa coincide with the opening of energy portals, which maximize our potential for connection. There is an Odu that discusses the days regarding Orisa. The day after Ose Ifa is Ogun's day, then Sango, then Obatala and back to Ifa. However, it really isn't necessary.

    Chief Fama, a traditionalist, who has written many books on the subject, is a reputable authority on Ifa/Orisa worship. She writes,

    "It (Ose Ifa) is also an ideal day to worship all the other Orisas. As humans, we constantly yearn for some things, be it something new in our lives, retention of what we already have, or additions to our possessions. We also crave company, be it in the form of friendship, relationship, family, and a group identity. If we are lucky to have all or most of these desires, needs, and wants fulfilled, our orientation changes to that of management, arrogance, humility, or reverence. Some of us appreciate Odumare more and regard each gift as a blessing, and every day as a unique presence of Odumare in our lives.
    Yet, we sometimes do not realize that the conscious thought of any of the above activities is a form of an iwure (prayer) from us to the unseen energy we believe exists somewhere and whom we call Odumare (God). When we fervently wish for something, even if we are not still, we are subconsciously wishing for manifestation of the desire. Sometimes, this strong desire slips into our subconscious state of rest—sleep—at which stage we dream about the thing: the thought, the feeling, the desire, and the need. Because we are passionate about the thing, we subconsciously transmit the message through our chosen media to Odumare. To us in Orisa Worship, our media are the Orisas.
    On this day of Ose Ifa dear Awo, conclude today's iwure with the chant below. However, the Orisas should be propitiated appropriately. How? We should approach the Orisas with honesty of purpose; we should present our offerings with genuine love; if we are truthfully unable to meet certain, positive spiritual obligations, we should explain that to the Orisa concerned and humbly ask for the Orisa's understanding. With all this in mind, we should offer our usual obi abata meji (two kola nuts), orogbo meji (two bitter Kola), ataare ((an African pepper), oti (liquor), epo pupa (palm oil), omi tutu (cool water), and our own special iwure (prayers). We may then chant:
    Bi mo duro, bi mo wure
    Ire ti emi, ko ni se aigba
    Bi mo bere, bi mo wure
    Ire ti emi, ko ni se aigba
    Bi mo joko, bi mo wure
    Ire ti emi, ko ni se aigba.

    English
    If I pray while standing
    My prayers will manifest
    If I stoop or kneel while praying
    My prayers will manifest
    If I sit while praying
    My prayers will manifest

    Baba a mi ku, mo je ogun ase (with an inherited ase of Orunmila and the Orisas), may our iwures manifest, today and always, ase. Awa ji ire ni oni o (we wake up with ire today—"Good Morning"). Ase.


    Aboru aboye.
    Chief FAMA
    Ileorunmila.com
    ifaseeyen group at yahoo
     
  3. emanuel goodman

    emanuel goodman Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Greetings and hetep


    I travel with shango. He has a very deep and protective quality about him. Can u give me some instruction on some ebos for him. I dont want him to feel neglected!
     
  4. awo dino

    awo dino Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    brother Emanuel,
    do you have a Sango pot? or an Esu? If you have either, then you can give an offering there. If not, you can go out in nature, like the forest, and find a spot, maybe at the base of a tree and do an offering there. An Ebo is usually done after a reading. What you are talking about i think is adimu, which is a food offering.
    you will find what you need to know in the above post. Except that sango doesn't take obi abata, but only orogbo - bitter kola. He also likes hot foods like Esu and Ogun - beans with hot peppers, etc.

    Really what's important is the intent, as stated in the excerpt from Iya Fama. Do you have Oriki for invocation? Iwure? I can hook you up if needed.
    May Sango bring you the protection you seek. Ase.

    p.s. Your ancestors are your first line of protection. Don't forget to propitiate them.
     
  5. emanuel goodman

    emanuel goodman Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    novice at this time

    Hetep

    I have known of the above sir, shango was presented to me by a good friend of mine as a selection of my first orisha. I have yet to study the yourba re ligion, i allready felt the forces so to speak inside of me and to be honest was afraid of its potential. I am ready to converse with my ancestors as well. I will study the above post to begin. hetep
     
  6. awo dino

    awo dino Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    o.k. brother Emanuel,
    I welcome you to the Ifa/Orisa community! ase.
    If your feeling it, then you should get a reading done. As has been written in many other posts, it is crucial that you find a someone reputable. Take your time. Where do you live? maybe someone here on this site can recommend an Orisa priestess, iya or a babalawo to do it. In the meantime, I have posted for you an Oriki and iwure for Sango.
    Orisa are a complicated concept. Like the Hindu pantheon, they are really aspects of God's creative energy that have been personalized. Sango personalized represents lightning (with the help of his "wife" Oya)thunder, fire. We shout his name during thunderstorms. But also some orisa were humans. That is, some people in Yoruba history were so exemplary of Orisa that they have been deified. Others believe that Oba (king) Sango became Orisa (due to his spiritual elevation). There is Odu that support this (the idea that human beings become orisa). So some consider orisa deified ancestors. Others see them as God's leutenants; highly evolved beings who help run creation. Or as facets of God's creative force.
    Sango was a king of Oyo. He was an excellent ruler and a great general. He exemplified courage, leadership, extraordinary strategic skills and governorship. He ruled with the help of his wife Oya. All orisa incorporate both masculine and feminine energy. If viewed from a more metaphysical angle, Sango is that facet of God's creative energy that embodies courage, strategic thinking and political organization. Sangos older brother, Ogun, is too raw to have been king. Ogun represents primal energy. his color in Yorubaland is red. Obatala their father, is "king of the white cloth" - white light. His color is white. he is way to contemplative and deep to be a ruler. He represents wisdom. Sango's colors are red and white. He has been tempered with obatala's wisdom. One story tells of when Ogun came into a town after a long trip and came across some brothers sitting around, and asked them for some palm wine - he saw they had some. When they refused, he lost it and killed everyone in town. Come to find out, they were under a temporary taboo against drinking wine. Distraught, Ogun went back out to the forest and stayed there. He's to **** hot to be amongst cityfolk. But Sango has the temperament to be Oba. People born Sango make good leaders.
    Oriki are chanted in order to connect with the given Orisa energy (invocation). this is usually followed by iwure, which is a request through prayer. As Ifa is an oral history, it incorporates time tested iwure, which can be followed by your own personal prayers. And last but not least, offerings. The elements that make up offerings to particular orisa are symbolic, of course, but also represent the idea of loving the Orisa, and reciprocity. it is believed that your iwure will be better communicated with the aid of such offerings.

    Oriki Sango
    (praising the Spirit of fire)

    Kawo Kabiyesile
    Hail to the Chief
    Etala mo juba Gadagba mo juba
    It is 13 times that I salute you
    Oluoyo
    Chief of Oyo
    Etala mo juba Gadagba mo juba
    It is 13 times that I salute you
    Oba koso
    The Chief who has not died
    Etala mo juba Gadagba mo juba
    It is 13 times that I salute you
    Ase.

    Another Oriki Sango

    The masquerade (mystic) in Oyo
    Citizen of Iwo town
    Citizen of of Odo Oba
    When Sango bothers them
    They think that they are being stung by ants
    Then, they run around (looking for a solution)
    Entity, who lives above the ground, do not block my path
    When Oya is called
    She should answer from Ira town
    When Orisa Oko is called,
    He should answer from Irawo town
    When Olubanji (Sango) is called
    He should answer from Koso town
    Oh, awe inspiring death
    He kills for a just cause
    When he meets them in the forest
    They go farther in the forest
    When he meets them on the road
    They become wanderers
    Sango, Oya's husband
    If Sango meets them in Igbodu (Ifa's grove)
    He initiates them (stops their fight out of respect for Orunmila)
    Sango, when you are in your fighting mood
    Spare the home of bata drummer (Sango's drummer)
    Spare the home of________(your name)
    a devotee rolls the pestle for a supportive Orisa (Sango)
    A devotee propitiates a supportive Orisa with obi abata
    (in Sango's case Orogbo - bitter kola)
    A parent who never forgets his children
    Sango! Oya's husband (my reverence, Sango)
    Kabiyesile! O!
    Mo juba O, Mo juba O
    Ire, Ire, Ire O

    (from "Fundamentals of the Yoruba Religion")
    Chief FAMA

    Iwure to Sango

    "Let's go," is the greeting to the peolpe before one
    "keep going" is the greeting to those behind one
    there is no cause for fear except if one is paranoid
    Divined for Olukoso la lu (Sango)
    Olubambi (Sango), great fighter who conquers with 200 stones
    and caused heavy rains to disrupt evil plotting
    When he was coming to Earth from Heaven
    once on Earth, he found himself in the midst of adversaries
    he was surrounded by enemies
    he was worried about imminent wars
    Sango in Heaven, I put my trust in you
    Arira (Sango) my fate is in your hands
    who called Sango irreverently?
    "not me, I didn't call Alado's name irreverently"
    who called you irreverently, Sango?
    I didn't call your name irreverently Alado
    who called Oba irreverently?
    I did not call Oba irreverently
    Modupe Sango
    Ase.

    Now you would add what ever prayers you want, and place the offering. Tell sango what you are offering.

    I hope that this gets you off to a blessed start on the path, brother Emanuel.

    ire
     
  7. emanuel goodman

    emanuel goodman Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Thank u very much! Time for pratice and implemenation! hetep
     
  8. awo dino

    awo dino Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    what are Orisa?

    I like this excerpt from Awo Falokun:

    “Ifa teaches that everything in nature is infused with consciousness called Ori. The various forms of consciousness or Ori that sustain dynamics and form in the universe are called Orisa meaning select consciousness or specific forms of consciousness. Ifa teaches that as we understand the inner essence of Natural forces we can learn to live in harmony with self and world. Ifa teaches that that consequence of living in harmony with self and world is the blessing of family, long life and abundance. [Orisa]... represent the fundamental principles associated with the most common manifestations of Nature as expressed by the ancestors who came to understand Nature through observation, trial and error, revelation and direct interaction with Spirit. Ifa preserves this wisdom so that each new generation does not have to re-invent the wheel. Ifa is based on the idea of Iwa pele commonly translated to mean good character. More accurately it means we come to greet the Earth from the elision Iwa ope ile. In traditional Yoruba culture a younger person always greets an elder. The world Iwa pele suggests that Nature is everyone’s elder and the source of understanding self and world. Because Ifa is rooted in the idea of atunwa (reincarnation), we learn from Nature so we can make the Earth a better place for future generations.”

    Awo Falokun Fatunmbi - awostudycenter.com, Ile Osomina
     
  9. Reniassance Man

    Reniassance Man Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Isn't this prayer supposed to be in the Yoruba language? Isnt it on a higher vibration in the original language. Is there anyway you can post it in the Yoruba Language.
    Like the other brotha, I follow this path as well.
    Question: Is it safe to use these prayers if one is not initiated into his/her priesthood?
    thanks for this info too. I love getting more knowledge on this stuff. I used to go to that website you posted but there is something wrong with the forum. Last time i was there, there were zero post and topics.
     
  10. awo dino

    awo dino Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Hi Renaissaance Man,
    If you speak yoruba, the you could chant in Yoruba. It's a difficult language. People always ask this question. I don't think it matters. What I do, is I do the invocations, praise names and oriki in Yoruba. sometimes I repeat them in English or spanish. But on a metaphysical level, it doesn't matter. whatever gets you "straight." I like to start my day, before I get into my daily Iba'se and oriki, with a Sufi chant - HUUUU - that gets me "warmed up." So, whatever.
    You don't have to be initiated. What, we would have a bunch of "pastors" and no "congregation." To be initiated is a huge commitment to yourself, and your community. But you do need some guidance. Find someone reputable who can show you how to set up an ancestral shrine. Go for divination. Work on good character everyday.
    You know, I adhere to this particular spiritual discipline for a couple of reasons. One, It's what I was exposed to as a child. Two, it is based in a comprehensive, complex theology that makes sense to me. I am a scientist and I need to see how my belief system functions. Ifa/Orisa worship, once you get passed all the pop silliness, provides a very detailed and scientific account of "how it works." As a child, I was exposed by my father to different religions and allowed to make my own decision. Having such exposure has allowed me to see that at the core, all spiritual paths are based on the same two things - sound and light. Three, having spent my early childhood in the Caribbean, I was able to see divination as a normal part of life. Over my lifetime, I have seen that it works. I feel sorry for those who adhere to religions whose controllers have chosen to hide this gift from them.
    Again, you don't have to be initiated into anything to practice the religion of your ancestors. I hope you are able to find some practitioners in your area.
    alaafia (peace)
     
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