Black Spirituality Religion : Orisha: Angelic forces of Nature

Discussion in 'Black Spirituality / Religion - General Discussion' started by Sekhemu, Aug 23, 2007.

  1. Sekhemu

    Sekhemu Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    The Yoruba contend that the study of nature is foremost. Nature is viewed as the manifestation of Olodumare's (The Creator) essence, translated as ashe, is the inherent force of all creation. The emphasis of such study or worship is not centered on the physical object or tangible, but on the life-force energy that brings about its form. The tangible object is but a symbol of the eternal existence that bore it.

    Oludumare is in all things as the ashe is the primal essence of all things. It is not the tree, the rock, the statue that Afrikan ancestors revere and worship but the deep energy that brought about its being. In maintaining the "nature religion" the ancestors were able to keep and also strengthen the very real connection between all things and human beings.

    This concept is basic and fundamental in respect to religious involvement. Olodumare, the Creator, must be seen in all things. Humans, devoid of oppressive ego, must see themselves as also part of the creation, and behave accordingly. In respect to Orisha, it is to be understood that as "angelic forces" they, too, are part of nature. As angels, they are comprised of greater heavenly properties and are closer to the divine source of existence. Their ability to act on hehalf of human beings is generally stated as divine intervention. Such intervention is brought about by divination, belief, faith, prayer, song and praise, dance, ritual, and sacrifice inclusive. This "bringing about" is a dual endeavor as both priest and devotee need follow certain guidelines and practices to efficaciously heal or correct a corrupted situation.

    Orisha as a term, is actually the combination of two Yoruba words. Ori which is the reflective part of human consciousness embedded in human essence, and sha which is the ultimate potentiality of that consciousness.

    The human consciousness needs to pass through stages of development in order to attain the highest levels. The orisha symbolize the forces and forms of human divinity potential. In Her Bak, it is written that, " the Neters [Divine beings-Orishas] are an expression of the principles and functions of divine power manifesting in nature. Their names and images as pictured in the myths define such principles and functions and they are offered that the student may learn to know them and seek them in him/her self." This concept maintained by the ancients of Kemet and West Africa is evident, though somewhat dismissed, in all forms of religious and spiritual development.

    The Yoruba maintain that worship of the orisha assist in the development of Iwa Pele or balanced character and balanced attitude. That the most important purpose of a person on earth is to come and exhibit that character and attitude. Religion, as a custom of worship, is not man's purpose, but only a means to an end while the end itself is Iwa Pele. Thus, the fundamental reality and respect to the divinity of self and the heavenly forces is that of pure and enlightened character development. This is the premise of true Orisha involvement. The connection between one's consciousness (Ori) and one's behavior (Iwa Pele) is clearly seen as reciprocal and relative. That is, the more enlightened one's consciousness becomes, in respect to the divine, the more one's behavior reflects the divine. Thus, the individual is deemed saintly or priestly in their development.

    The Orisha

    The word Ori means head. It means the apex of all things, the highest of any endeavor. In the human body Ori is divided into two--the physical head and the spiritual head. The spiritual head is (also) divided into two-- the Ori Apari--inner [the internal spiritual Ori] and the Ori Apere (the sign of an individuals personal Orisha). The Ori Ode (physical head), the Ori Inu (the internal spirit), and the Iponri (the soul space of the inner-self) are more noted definitions of Ori. It is revealed in the Odu, Ogunda that, "no Orisha blesses a person without consent of their Ori. One whose Ori has accepted the sacrifice is one who should rejoice exceedingly." In all forms of ritual sacrifice offerings are first placed to the center or top of the head. This is due to Ori and the appeasement of Ori's divine nature.
     
  2. OmowaleX

    OmowaleX Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Study the Forces of Nature...

    :thinking:

    What else is there?

    On point as usual.

    Thanks brother Sek.

    :bowdown: :bowdown: :bowdown:
     
  3. Sekhemu

    Sekhemu Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    No, thank you brotha Omo.
     
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